Digital Darkroom

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Steve Bedell Posted: Feb 01, 2006 3 comments

One look at the work of Richard Lohmann and you know you are viewing the work of a very skilled photographic practitioner. But what really has Lohmann excited these days are evolutions in digital technology. A combination of advanced film processing techniques and new ink technology has convinced Lohmann that he can now produce images comparable in quality to platinum prints...

Howard Millard Posted: Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

Mysterious, evocative, otherworldly--these are all terms that describe the powerful emotional and visual responses to black and white infrared (IR) photography. For landscapes, this approach yields striking, contrasty images where healthy green foliage, which strongly reflects IR radiation, appears to glow in snowy white tones, while blue skies and water darken dramatically.

William Davis Posted: Feb 01, 2006 1 comments

Stymied by all the buzz about megapixels, dpis, ppis, and what-have-you? Should you use a digital camera? Or shoot film? And which is really better? Well, yes, it's a veritable jungle of competing facts, pseudo-facts, and ideologies out there. Then there is the obsolescence factor. As someone who bought a Nikon F Photomic in 1968, a Linhof 4x5 in '70 and proceeded to...

Monte Zucker Posted: Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

There's something about a good black and white image that makes it jump off the page. It should be simple, direct, and hit you right between the eyes. It stands on its own. It doesn't even need color to make it stand out. It has a full range of tones from a true, deep black all the way to a clear white...with detail throughout.

What kind of...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Jan 01, 2006 0 comments

You may not think of Photoshop as being a flat-bed scanner tool, but it's way ahead of whatever is in second place. Recently we had a customer who wanted a whole shoebox of family snapshots scanned and converted to digital files. This could have been a very time-consuming job if it were not for Photoshop CS and the delightful way it works with all flat-bed scanners.
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Ellen Anon Posted: Nov 01, 2005 0 comments

As more and more images are made digitally, whether directly from a camera or via scans, photographers, educators, and lecturers of all sorts are creating and displaying digital slide shows using a host of different projectors. It's even becoming difficult to find slide projectors at some venues. Yet, many digital photographers are horrified the first time they project their...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

There are many different ways to make selections, each making life easier depending on the image and areas you want to define. Here's how I make selections that involve a lot of straight lines:

This picture, taken indoors looking out through large windows is a prime example of backlighting causing underexposure (#1). The fix for it is to select the well-lit outdoor...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

This article is an excerpt from Jon Canfield's book "RAW 101: Better Images with Photoshop Elements and Photoshop." It is available now in most bookstores and online. Published by Sybex, the 160-page book leads you through workflow and common raw conversion steps using Adobe Camera Raw (www.adobe.com).

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Howard Millard Posted: Sep 01, 2005 0 comments

They're both round and have a hole in the center. But are CDs and DVDs really digital life preservers? How long will they last? What are the safest and most reliable brands? What about hard drives--how safe are they? What can you do to best preserve your digital images and data? What are the best media to buy, how should you store them, and how do you archive and...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Jul 01, 2005 Published: Jun 13, 2005 0 comments

In the old days we all used to keep tons of different colored matte board in stock to matte our photos. Or, we used the guy down the street who charged us plenty for those fancy mattes that we loved so much. Well, today you can do it all in Adobe's Photoshop. This article will give you the basics of creating an oval double matte in Photoshop.

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

I am frequently asked how to cut people out of one picture and paste them into another. All such work is preceded by first making a "selection" of the area that you want to cut out. Selections can be made many different ways. And, to some degree, the method you choose usually has to do with the nature of the material or people who you want to select.
With...

Woody Walters Posted: Apr 01, 2005 1 comments

All Photos © 2004, Woody Walters, All Rights Reserved

Ansel Adams once told me that it is the background that makes or breaks the image. The background is what will tie all the key elements of a photograph together. I learned very early in my career that it's true whether you're shooting large format landscapes or even if you're shooting digital senior...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Jon Canfield, All Rights Reserved

Accurate skin tones can be one of the most vexing problems facing the digital portrait photographer. The human eye sees skin tones as memory colors--we know what to expect, and when we see something different, our brain registers the fact, making everything else in the image seem off color. The reverse is also...

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Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Joe Farace, All Rights Reserved

The biggest challenge when photographing cars at auto shows--indoors or out--is dealing with cluttered backgrounds. In the past I've used low angles, high angles and postproduction techniques to blur the setting and add some zoom-zoom. That approach shifted my focus from the subject to its surroundings...

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Jeff Wignall Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Jeff Wignall, All Rights Reserved

I'd be a rich man if I had a buck for every time I've stumbled upon a great landscape scene only to mutter to myself (and anyone else within earshot), "What a horrible sky." There's something entirely deflating about finding an interesting foreground scene with a sky the color of aged...

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