Digital Darkroom
Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Digital Darkroom
Joe Farace May 01, 2007 0 comments

A vailable light, unavailable light, available darkness, or low light. It doesn’t matter what you call it.

Digital Darkroom
Steve Bedell May 01, 2007 0 comments

Retouching a portrait using film used to be a pretty simple task. Send the negative to your lab, check the “retouch” box, pay $5 or so, and the job was done.

Digital Darkroom
Peter K. Burian May 01, 2007 0 comments

In digital photography, exposure control is sometimes considered irrelevant. “You can easily fix any problems in your computer,” some friends will suggest.

Digital Darkroom
Joseph A. Dickerson May 01, 2007 0 comments

Have you always been intrigued by panoramic photography but couldn’t bring yourself to pony up for a dedicated panorama camera? Well, today you don’t have to.

Digital Darkroom
Joe Farace May 01, 2007 0 comments

One of the easiest ways to improve your images is to use lens filters, but like so much in the photo world, life is rarely that simple.

Digital Darkroom
Chris Maher and... May 01, 2007 2 comments

Both fiber-based and RC photographic prints have been around for many years, and the materials and processes to mount and frame them are well understood.

Digital Darkroom
Howard Millard May 01, 2007 0 comments

Whether you shoot portraits, landscapes, still life, or nature, soft focus effects can add an evocative, mysterious tone to your photographs.

Digital Darkroom
Anthony L. Celeste Apr 01, 2007 0 comments

Many people tend to associate JPEGs with poor quality. However, when a JPEG has poor quality, it's the result of the format being used incorrectly, not a flaw in the format itself. Used properly, JPEG can and will produce a file that cannot be distinguished from any other format.

The main advantage of JPEG is clearly its superior compression. An RGB image...

Digital Darkroom
Philip Andrews Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

Despite what many photographers think, there is more to Photoshop's layer technology than its ability to bring together several images. Some of the most sophisticated layer techniques are not based on composing different image parts but rather use the characteristics of the layer technology to provide nondestructive editing alternatives for many of our standard enhancement...

Digital Darkroom
Steve Bedell Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

In this article I'm going to show you how combining two software programs and one plug-in can make your life easier and your workflow faster. As a bonus (see sidebar), I'm going to show you a way to handle dodging and burning that is nondestructive to your files. First up, we've got a family portrait with 16 people to retouch. That sounds like an hour's...

Digital Darkroom
Jon Canfield Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

One of the most frequent questions I get from readers or students is about dpi, or dots per inch. There's a great deal of confusion out there on what the best settings are, and it isn't being made any easier by the use of two different measurements for resolution.

First, we have ppi, or pixels per inch, which usually applies to image resolution. This is...

Digital Darkroom
Phillip Andrews Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

For most photographers being able to switch from color to black and white with a few simple mouse clicks is one of the most powerful aspects of digital imaging. With digital you no longer need to pick color or black and white before taking the photo, as was the case when film was king. Now after color capture the decision to convert to monochrome can be made easily at the...

Digital Darkroom
Jon Canfield Dec 01, 2006 0 comments

In my last column I covered using Unsharp Mask to sharpen your images for output, whether print or screen. This time, we'll go a step further and talk about selective sharpening. Why would you want to use selective sharpening? It's the ideal choice when working on portraits, where you want to keep the skin smooth but have good detail and focus on the eyes. You'll...

Digital Darkroom
David B. Brooks Dec 01, 2006 0 comments

This article is for those of you who color correct and adjust your image files to attain what looks like an ideal photograph on screen, but whose prints don't match that perfect screen image. Of all the challenges and disappointments digital photographers express to me in e-mails I receive almost daily, matching screen to print is the most common. It is also the most...

Digital Darkroom
Darryl C. Nicholas Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

If you photograph outdoors in daylight you're going to have minor exposure problems. You simply can't control the light as much as you might like, or need.

Our example is typical. The red barn is exposed correctly, but the grass is "hot" and the sky is washed out. Here is how you can correct these two little faults:
...