Outdoor/Travel

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Tony Sweet Posted: Nov 01, 2002 0 comments

Early on in my career, as an instructor with The Great American Photography Weekend workshop company, I had the privilege of teaching with some of the greatest nature photographers in the world. One of the first things that I learned was from...

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Joseph A. Dickerson Posted: Nov 01, 2002 0 comments

Riddle: what do Ansel Adams, the Lone Ranger, Hopalong Cassidy, William Mulholland, and Gunga Din all have in common? Answer: a geographical area of California that is as rich in human history, geological wonder, and photographic beauty...

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Richard Pahl Posted: Oct 01, 2002 0 comments

We all know the colors of fall, don't we? Golds, greens, oranges, and reds, right? And we all know when fall arrives, right? Sometime after school begins, right? Or does it come around September 21st? Would it surprise you to know...

Susan McCartney Posted: Aug 01, 2002 0 comments

My niece and keen amateur photographer Elizabeth Martin celebrated the coming of the new millennium on a mountainside near Katmandu, Nepal. She carried a backpack containing a Canon EOS Elan, 20 rolls of color print film, three pairs of wool socks, her...

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Tony L. Corbell Posted: Jul 01, 2002 0 comments

People who have attended art classes have been taught that in order to produce depth in a painting there must be a foreground, middle ground, and background. Control over this dimension and depth usually is the result of planning and foresight. As...

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Kerry Drager Posted: Jul 01, 2002 0 comments

Foreground frames show a subject in its environment and, at the same time, lead the eye through the picture. Done effectively, this "sense of place" approach can produce a three-dimensional effect, with the scene sweeping away from front to back and giving viewers the...

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Clint Farlinger Posted: May 01, 2002 0 comments

"What are you photographing?" I was so lost in the scene in my viewfinder that it took a few moments before I realized she was talking to me.

"All the textures and colors in the...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 2002 0 comments

Kevin Gilbert was in a hurry.
"I'm heading out for a six-week assignment," the globetrotting photographer
said to me over the phone about a year ago. So we made it a fast conversation.
I got the information I needed for the story I was working on, andth...

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Larry Mulvehill Posted: May 01, 2002 0 comments

As a film-based Nikon photographer for 40 years, I made my first foray into digital with the purchase of a Nikon D1 before leaving for a month in southeast Asia. I was determined to satisfy my urge to use digital exclusively on this trip in a totally professional way...

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: May 01, 2002 0 comments

Where are alternatives to
on-camera flash. Understanding this is one of the defining moments in
most photographers' progress. Up to a certain point, you just turn on
the flash, or shrug and say, "There isn't enough light." Then, one day--like
a...

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Tony Sweet Posted: Apr 01, 2002 0 comments

This scene was the last of a very long and exciting photography workshop that I conducted in North Carolina. We were all pretty tired and a bit anxious to get home. We found the sky interesting at Table Rock and decided to work this as our final...

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Dave Howard Posted: Dec 01, 2001 0 comments

No matter what tourist-saturated locale I find myself at, I can't help but notice all the cameras getting packed away just before sundown (unless, of course, there's a spectacular sunset brewing). If water, in its myriad forms...

Rick Sammon Posted: Nov 01, 2001 0 comments

Photo enthusiasts often ask me, "What's the most important accessory I need for professional-quality outdoor people pictures?" I reply, "A flash unit, of course." Then they ask me for my best tip for using a flash. My advice: Think flashy...

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Dave Howard Posted: Sep 01, 2002 Published: Sep 01, 2001 0 comments

America has long fostered the "bigger is better" philosophy of life. Bigger cars, bigger houses, bigger everything.

The visual equivalent of this attitude is evident in the movies...

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Elliot Kornberg, MD Posted: Aug 01, 2001 0 comments

To travel to Cuba is to step back in time. The streets of Havana and Santiago de Cuba are a living transportation museum: '55 Chevys and '49 Pontiacs share the road with "newer" Russian Latas from the '70s and '80s. Horse-drawn...

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