Outdoor/Travel

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Maynard Switzer Posted: Jan 01, 2010 0 comments

My route to travel photography was not direct, but looking back, I realize the direction was set fairly early.

While attending the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, I got a chance to spend a semester break photographing in Arkansas at the oldest bluegrass festival in the US. I never forgot how much I’d enjoyed photographing the festival and the local...

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Chuck Graham Posted: Dec 01, 2009 1 comments

The Carrizo Plain National Monument, located in California’s Central Valley (a four-hour drive north of Los Angeles), is known as California’s “Serengeti” because of its plethora of wildlife diversity thriving in the last of California’s historic grasslands. This 50-mile stretch of sweeping grasslands lies between the Caliente and Temblor Mountain Ranges, one of my...

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Rick Sheremeta Posted: Nov 01, 2009 0 comments

Glacier National Park, named for its glacially-carved terrain and remnants of past glaciers, is located in the northwest corner of Montana. Recognized as a World Heritage Site, it sports over a million acres of vast wilderness and is home to more than 70 species of mammals, including black and grizzly bear, gray wolf, lynx, wolverine, mountain lion, and elk. The park also hosts well over 260...

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Robin Smillie Posted: Sep 01, 2009 0 comments

“For uncounted centuries the highest mountains in the world have hidden a tiny jewel, the Buddhist kingdom of Bhutan.”

For uncounted centuries the highest mountains in the world have hidden a tiny jewel, the Buddhist kingdom of Bhutan. In 1999 my wife and I were watching a 60 Minutes episode when Morley Safer came on and said, “While most governments are concerned with...

David FitzSimmons Posted: Aug 01, 2009 0 comments

This emotional rush that comes with first seeing a waterfall—and then the incurable urge to find as many vantage points as possible around it—compelled me to begin documenting these secluded, sibilant landscapes. You see, I have always loved waterfalls. When I was younger, my parents loaded the three boys in the family station wagon, “the boat,” as we called it, pointed...

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David W. Shaw Posted: Jun 01, 2009 1 comments

It was late afternoon on my last day in Big Bend National Park. I faced east where the Chisos Mountains rose up in steep cliffs from the desert. A few days after the New Year, there was a slight chill in the air but I was not thinking about the temperature. Rather, I was concentrating on the rapidly shifting light as the sun sank and clouds moved back and forth. With my camera mounted on a...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

Ron Haviv has created some of the most moving images of our time, his photographs commanding the highest accolades in the field of photojournalism, including awards from World Press Photo, Overseas Press Club, and Pictures of the Year. Haviv has portrayed the ravages of war, creating the pages of history as the world is being transformed. He has covered conflicts in Panama...

Steve Bedell Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Like most photographers, I like to play around and constantly explore Photoshop. But I'm a businessman, too, so I need to be careful about how much time I spend in front of the computer. The more time I spend there, the less I have for taking photos and marketing my services, and that's where I make money. So I've always adopted the philosophy of getting it right...

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Efrain M. Padro Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Straddling the border between Argentina and Brazil, the Iguazú Falls are one of the world's most dramatic waterfalls. Comprised of 250 separate cascades, the falls tumble about 200 ft from the Upper to the Lower Iguazú River below. The combination of massive waterfalls, lush subtropical vegetation, and varied local fauna makes this UNESCO World Natural Heritage...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Here are a few things AJ Neste's learned about photographing surfers:
One, it's the singer, not the song. "The most important part of being successful at this," he says, "is knowing the surfer. It's not just showing up somewhere and taking photos of random surfers. You won't know their personal style."

...

Scott Stulberg Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Being a photography instructor is very rewarding and has proved to be an inspiration to me. Teaching Digital Photography at UCLA Extension in Los Angeles, I have found the interaction with students benefited me at least as much as them. But what if someone wants to take your class and is halfway around the world? That is where online teaching comes in and I am lucky enough to have...

Brad Perks Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Rainbows have inspired legends of luck and good fortune. The beautiful colors are created in a simple process. Capturing a rainbow with your camera takes a bit of that good luck.

Rainbows require two simple ingredients--sunlight and raindrops. They combine at just the right angle to colonize a beautiful picture. The colors are formed when...

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Clint Farlinger Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

Nothing. Absolutely nothing. Maybe the occasional splash of a drop of water, but other than that, nothing. After a few moments, the park ranger states that anyone who has a question should raise their hand now. Everyone chuckles and the lights come back on to once again reveal the huge expanse that only hints at the size of Mammoth Cave. When no artificial light source is present...

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Jack Hollingsworth Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

Call it instinct or intuition, but something is telling you what pictures you should be taking. I call it the quiet little voice, and when it talks, I try to listen. The problem is, as we move on in our careers, or our hobbies, other voices take over, and we often stop listening, or listening enough, to the guiding voice that comes from within.

...

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Chuck Graham Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

The Channel Islands National Park off the coast of Santa Barbara in southern California (a 1.5-hour drive west of Los Angeles) is my favorite national park in terms of photography, adventure, and natural history.

During the last Ice Age there was just one super island known as Santarosae. At the time, the channel crossing was roughly 5 miles across.

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