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Joe Farace Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

The EXILIM Pro EX-F1 is the second Casio digital camera I've ever tested. I wrote about that first one, the QV-10, for a computer magazine back in 1995 and boy, things have really changed. The Pro EX-F1 marks a departure for the company from its line of stylish point-and-shoot digicams. Instead, it's a capable electronic viewfinder (EVF) digicam that delivers...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

Billed as the "world's smallest digital SLR," this Olympus model is an upgraded version of the E-410 with several benefits. These include a slightly larger (2.7") LCD screen with better display quality, more versatile autofocus in Live View, plus support for wireless off-camera TTL flash. Image quality has also been improved slightly with a tweaked sensor...

Jon Canfield Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

The Epson Stylus Photo R1800 has been a popular choice for digital photographers needing a 13x19 format but not willing or able to spend the additional money for the R2400. Add to that exceptional gloss printing thanks to a special Gloss Optimizer, and you have an excellent option for high-quality printing at an attractive price.

But, as usual, the market...

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

The Canon Digital Rebel series draws on a long tradition of Rebel cameras, going back to the 35mm SLR days, with cameras that were always companionable, easy to use, lightweight, and "simplified" for the general user. That simplification does not mean unsophisticated; to get simple to work there has to be lots of tech in the background. That was true with the Rebel...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Earlier this year, Sony became the most prolific D-SLR manufacturer by announcing four cameras within a two-week period. This included a pro model, due later this year, that had scant specs available at press time. I was able to extensively test the other three, which are quite similar in that they all start from the same "base": the entry-level 10-megapixel A200...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2008 1 comments

Nikon keeps cranking out new D-SLRs, most recently with the D3 and D300 (see Shutterbug reviews at www.shutterbug.com), and now, building on the great success with their amateur line-up of the D40 and D40X, the new D60. Sporting 10.2 megapixels (same as the D40X), the D60 has the lightweight and portable feel of the D40 series, with some extra tricks up its sleeve. Foregoing...

Jason Schneider Posted: Jun 20, 2008 0 comments

With its 12.1-megapixel sensor, Raw and Raw+JPEG Capture modes, 6x (35-210mm equivalent f/2.8-4.8) zoom lens with Optical Image Stabilizer, real image optical zoom finder, 3" LCD, and dedicated hot shoe, the top-of-the-line Canon PowerShot G9 definitely has the street creds of a high-performance, pro-caliber compact, which is why we're reviewing it here in Shutterbug.

Shutterbug Staff Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

As part of our annual Photo Marketing Association (PMA) coverage we ask our reporters to deliver a "Best of Show" award. While each contributor had their own beat, we also asked them to go beyond their respective area of coverage to find what, for them, signified a breakthrough product, technology, or new trend that they felt would affect all photographers in the...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

Although the D-SLR category is growing more rapidly, digicams with integral lenses still outsell the larger cameras by roughly 10 to 1. That's primarily because of the lower price and particularly the greater portability. Even the most serious photographer usually wants a pocket-size camera--with built-in lens and flash--that they can carry most anywhere.
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Jason Schneider Posted: Jun 01, 2008 1 comments

What happens in Vegas is supposed to stay there--unless it happens to be one of the eight hot new D-SLRs that debuted at the annual PMA Show. Yes, 2008 is shaping up as a banner year for the expanding D-SLR sector and neither the pace of D-SLR sales nor the advancing technology that goes along with it is showing any sign of slowing down.

With eight new D-SLR...

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Steve Anchell Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

The D3 is positioned as a pro camera, priced and marketed to those whose livelihood depends on consistently creating the best possible images, be they photojournalists, sports or fashion photographers. The two things that someone who makes a living in photography looks for in any new camera is quality and "what can this camera do for me?"

 

Don't let...

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George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Buffs of infrared photography often go to great lengths to get the ethereal effects that define their images. Now that Kodak has served notice that their high-speed black and white IR film is on the endangered species list, there will be IR film shooters everywhere looking for a way to continue their exploration of that fascinating world. In the past year we have reviewed two Fuji...

George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

A funny thing happened to me while I was shooting and reviewing the new Sigma DP1 compact camera in New Mexico. I had taken a lunch break in a local taqueria and in came a couple that sat down at the next table. Next to the guy's backpack and hat he set down the Sigma DP1. I did a double take, and asked him how he liked it. "Great," he said, "the picture...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

The second D-SLR from Panasonic, this 10-megapixel model is quite different than the original 7-megapixel Lumix DMC-L1. The latter--built like a tank, and still available--is an unusually traditional model in many respects. It resembles a large/heavy 35mm rangefinder camera and features "retro"-style controls, including a mechanical aperture ring on the...

David B. Brooks Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

As a photo enthusiast becomes more serious about making pictures, acquiring a larger and larger set of tools (lenses and accessories) to accommodate every possible contingency and capability seems to be essential. Unfortunately, a complex of lenses and accessories can make it all a very deliberate exercise. We all wish it could be more of a spontaneous, free-spirited adventure and...

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