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Edited by George Schaub Posted: Sep 13, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 0 comments

Every year member magazines from the Technical Image Press Association (TIPA) gather to consider and vote on the top products of the year in 40 categories, ranging from cameras to tripods to software and printers. This year’s selections represent technological sophistication along with features and functionality that make them leaders in their respective categories.

Joe Farace Posted: Jan 06, 2017 0 comments

Some trends just won’t go away: Billboard magazine notes that U.S. vinyl album sales are up 53 percent, generating $416 million in sales. Stereophile, our sister publication, reviews new analog audio equipment and you can purchase new Nikon F6 or Leica M-A film cameras from Shutterbug advertisers. Ferrania is back making film and the Japan Camera Hunter website is making their own film, a discontinued Agfa emulsion they’re calling JCH StreetPan 400. Amazon’s top-selling photo item is Fuji’s Instax Mini Instant Film. There’s even a new twin-lens instant camera, Mint’s InstantFlex TL70, and yes, I gotta get me one of those.

Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jul 09, 2015 0 comments

The concept isn’t new. Gamers have been using dedicated yokes, rudder pedals and throttles with Flight Simulator and aerial combat games for at least three decades. Even Super Mario racing games can be purchased with steering wheel controllers. But the Palette Kit from Canadian firm Palette is the most comprehensive set of alternative input hardware interfaces for Lightroom and Photoshop ever. 

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Sep 25, 2014 0 comments

ACD Systems recently announced the release of two new image-editing/management products: ACDSee Pro 8 and ACDSee 18. Offering users a variety of imaging features in an easy to use, affordable package, ACDSee Pro 8 is designed to be the complete solution for image enhancement and the control of image production for professional level photographers.

John Brandon Posted: Mar 01, 2010 0 comments

For the pro photographer, there are two possible scenarios in managing a photographic workflow. One is the scattershot method, the second approach features a clear organizational method.

John Brandon Posted: Jul 05, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 5 comments

With each successive release of ACDSee Pro, the photo management suite adds ever-more-powerful features. In this review I hope to help you decide whether or not its features match up with your own workflow, meet your needs, or even improve on existing features to enhance your photographic creations.

 

In my own workflow, the new version, ACDSee Pro 5, smoothed over a few rough edges in the editing process and made my management chores a bit less time-consuming. The release is not so groundbreaking that it might make you consider abandoning Adobe Lightroom or Apple Aperture altogether, but there are some pro-level additions that are definitely worth considering. The program never crashed and operated quickly for just about any task on a standard desktop PC. Note I said PC—there is no Mac version available or considered at this point.

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The Editors Posted: Feb 09, 2016 0 comments

We’ve always felt that Adobe’s Bridge image management application has been an unsung (or under-sung) application in the company’s Creative Cloud (CC) software set. Well, this morning, Bridge took center stage as the company has finally updated the application with Adobe Bridge CC version 6.2. (The last major release of Bridge came more than two years ago.)

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Dan Havlik Posted: Apr 21, 2015 0 comments

Adobe just announced a big update to its subscription-based Creative Cloud photography plan including the release of the new Lightroom CC which is designed to work faster and introduces new tools for editing, organizing and showing off your images.

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Sep 24, 2014 0 comments

Adobe has announced Photoshop Elements 13 and Premiere Elements 13, which are the latest versions of Adobe’s popular consumer photo and video editing software. Filled with a variety of new creative features and tools, Adobe Photoshop Elements 13 and Premiere Elements 13 are designed to be fun, easy to use and affordable. The new Elements Live portal (found within the software) is an educational tool that offers users a constant supply of fresh tips, tricks and inspiration designed to enhance their image-editing skills—from beginner to advanced level and beyond.

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Mar 19, 2015 0 comments

Adobe just announced that Adobe Camera Raw 8.8 is now available as a final release on Adobe Labs. ACR 8.8 adds Raw support for nine new cameras, including the Nikon D5500.

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Feb 19, 2015 0 comments

Adobe Photoshop, the popular innovative imaging software, turns 25 today. At this point, it's hard to deny that Photoshop touches much of the imagery that surrounds us: from striking commercial photos to high-impact logos; the apps on your iPhone; the sleek design of your running shoes; and blockbuster movies.

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Sep 28, 2015 0 comments

Looking for photo editing software but don't want to pay subscription pricing for Photoshop CC? Your answer could be the recently launched Adobe Photoshop Elements 14 and Premiere Elements 14.

Dan Havlik Posted: Jul 31, 2014 0 comments

Adobe announced this morning that final release versions of Lightroom 5.6 and Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) 8.6 are now available.

Adobe customers can can get the apps through the update mechanism in Photoshop CC and Photoshop CS6, or through the download links at the bottom of this page. Adobe says these updates correct "issues reported in earlier versions of Lightroom 5 and Camera Raw 8," without being specific about what those issues were.

The Editors Posted: Feb 27, 2001 5 comments

Improvements in capabilities and ease of use make the most popular pro image-editing program even better

Adobe Photoshop was introduced 11 years ago this month, and it's been the photo-editing tool of choice for most serious photographers and desktop-publishing professionals ever since. Does that make it the right one for you? Well, if you're serious about digital...

John Brandon Posted: Mar 12, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 2 comments

Adobe Photoshop Elements 10 caters to the entry-level crowd, but is imbued with several professional-level tools. Even when a feature is not really intended for serious photographers, there is a goldmine of functionality that could save countless hours. The app is celebrating 10 years on the market. Adobe has slowly revised the workflow, and it’s getting much better.

 

In this version, you’ll first see a start-up screen with two buttons, one for organizing photos and one for editing. It makes more sense to click the button to organize images first, especially if you’re not even sure which images need editing.

When you do, one of the first prompts you’ll see asks how you normally import photos. That’s handy, because even the most experienced pro has to get photos off the camera somehow. You might typically load images onto a network drive, or prefer loading directly off the camera. (An option to scan images seems woefully dated these days.) Whatever option you choose, you can always go back and select a different import default. For now, it just means, when you start Elements 10, the app will automatically look for that specific source.

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