Image Tech

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jan 24, 2014 Published: Dec 01, 2013 0 comments

The robust and relatively heavy body of the Canon SX50 HS has a metal-based chassis and is designed like a small SLR system. A large handle on the right-hand side of the body gives a stable grip and allows for comfortable handling when shooting. The motorized zoom lens is controlled via an easy-to-use zoom switch; focal length selection is quite sensitive to the touch.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jun 13, 2012 Published: May 01, 2012 10 comments

The Fuji X10 offers a 4x zoom lens with manual zoom control. The zoom lens ring is also used as the On/Off switch. The photographer has to turn the zoom ring to unlock the lens and to start the camera, which we found to be a very handy feature. We also feel that manual zoom control allows for a more precise and fast adjustment of the focal length compared to the servo zooms of some other compact cameras.

George Schaub Posted: Jul 19, 2011 2 comments

The Fujifilm Finepix X100 is designed like a classic viewfinder camera yet it offers state-of-the-art digital technology and some brand new and innovative systems. The Hybrid viewfinder, for example, is an example of a sophisticated enhancement of a classic concept. First of all, there’s a very bright and large optical viewfinder onto which the camera will overlay exposure information (aperture, shutter speed) and a parallax marker. Instead of using an optical system to create these overlay elements, as done in classic viewfinders of analog cameras, it uses a high resolution LCD. This results in detailed information and a very crisp look.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Sep 07, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 31 comments

The HS30EXR has a surprisingly heavy and massive body and is nearly the size of an entry-level SLR system combined with a superzoom lens. The grip on the right-hand side fits perfectly into the photographer’s hand, while the left hand supports the lens system and is used to change focus and focal length manually with two large lens rings. The focal length ring has a nice rubber coating and is easy to handle, while the focus ring is very thin and is located near the body of the camera, which makes it a bit less easy to handle. Focal length adjustment is done via a mechanical regulation of the lens system, while the focusing ring adjusts via a servo system.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jun 04, 2013 0 comments

The Fujifilm HS50EXR is a bridge camera with an SLR-like design and a super zoom lens. The camera has very good workmanship/finishing; the body and the lens system are large and robust.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Sep 02, 2014 0 comments

The Fujifilm X-A1 is the “little sister” of the X-M1. Both cameras have nearly the same design and technical features but use different sensor technology. The X-M1 uses Fujifilm’s X-Trans CMOS sensor while the X-A1 is equipped with a 16MP sensor with the Bayer RGB pattern, although it should be mentioned it is APS-C size. The different sensors are the main reason for the lower price of the X-A1, making it one of the least expensive X-type cameras with a detachable lens system.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Aug 20, 2013 Published: Jul 01, 2013 0 comments

The X-E1 is the second mirrorless system camera made by Fujifilm. In contrast to the X-Pro1, it has an electronic viewfinder with ultrahigh resolution (2.3 million RGB dots) instead of the X-Pro1’s hybrid viewfinder (combination of optical viewfinder and electronic viewfinder).

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jul 15, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments

The Fujifilm X-E2 is a compact system camera with a “retro” design that offers 16MP resolution. Compared to its forerunner, the X-E1, changes include an electronic viewfinder with extremely high resolution. The small OLED display of the X-E2 has 2.36 million RGB dots and shows a brilliant, very crisp reproduction of the viewfinder image, images in review mode, and menus. The combination of the high-resolution monitor, the electronic magnifier (“viewfinder loupe”), and the focus peaking function are very helpful when working in manual focus mode.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Apr 18, 2014 Published: Mar 01, 2014 2 comments

The Fujifilm X-M1 is an extremely compact system camera that uses Fujifilm’s 16MP X-Trans CMOS sensor. The camera offers very high image quality due to its special RGB filter array which differs from the standard Bayer RGB pattern. The pattern on the APS-C-sized X-Trans sensor resembles the random pattern of grain of analog film and reduces image noise. The interpretation of this RGB pattern isn’t very easy, but the most current versions of Adobe’s Photoshop Camera Raw plug-in and Adobe’s Lightroom are able to convert this pattern correctly.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Oct 09, 2012 Published: Sep 01, 2012 22 comments

The new Fujifilm X-Pro1 has a stylish, retro design with many interesting features. It is Fujifilm’s first compact system camera with Fujifilm’s new lens mount system. Fujifilm currently offers three lenses for the “X mount”: the XF18mm f/2 R, the XF35mm f/1.4 R, and the XF60mm f/2.4 R Macro. We used the 35mm lens for all our test images and the 60mm lens for the portrait test shot.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2012 0 comments

The X-S1 is Fujifilm’s newest bridge camera based on the same large EXR sensor (2/3 in) used in the company’s X-10 camera. The camera offers an extreme zoom lens (26x) for a (35mm equivalent) range of 24mm-624mm. An optical image stabilizer aids in preventing motion blur when using the extreme tele setting or shooting under low light conditions.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jan 02, 2015 0 comments

The Fujifilm X-T1 is a retro-style mirrorless Compact System Camera (CSC) that looks like an SLR of the 1970s and offers numerous setup dials to change nearly all image parameters without using the LCD screen menu. A dial for shutter speed, ISO speed, and EV control (+/- 3 EV steps) sits atop the camera. Below the ISO speed and the shutter speed dial, the camera offers additional setup rings that allow for change of the exposure mode (spot metering, for example), of the drive mode (single shot, continuous shot in two different rates), or to activate the bracketing function.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Apr 16, 2013 0 comments

Fujifilm’s X100s follows the X100 and offers enhanced imaging features and functions. The most important difference is the new sensor--the X-Trans CMOS sensor uses aspecial RGB mosaic pattern and offers higher resolution compared to the sensor in the X100. The new sensor has special mirco lenses that result in a very sharp and brilliant image, which is then enhanced further with the camera’s new EXR II image processor.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: May 03, 2013 2 comments

The X20 uses an X-Trans sensor just like all new Fujifilm X cameras. Instead of an APS-C-sized system it’s a 2/3 inch sensor, which is slightly smaller than APS-C, but still very large for a compact camera. In combination with the moderate resolution of 12MP the camera offers very clean and noise-free images.

Edited by George Schaub Posted: Jan 03, 2014 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments

The Leica M is a large and robust rangefinder camera with a magnesium-alloy chassis with top and bottom covers cut from brass blocks. All elements are carefully sealed against dust and moisture and overall offers the handling, feel, and touch one has come to associate with Leica M cameras of the past.

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading