Paper & Ink

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Tom Fuller Posted: Oct 01, 1999 0 comments

To those still on the quest for an affordable, good quality black and white paper, the time has come to sheath your reading glass. Adorama Variable Grade, a medium weight RC available in glossy and Mother-of-Pearl surfaces, meets the requirements and may...

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Dave Howard Posted: Oct 01, 2001 0 comments

With the inexorable advance of the digital juggernaut, it's always encouraging to witness the introduction of a new, traditional, photographic paper. Adorama's Ador Variable Grade Fiber Base paper being reviewed here is replacing...

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Tom Fuller Posted: Feb 01, 2000 0 comments

As French-made Bergger black and white film and paper meet virtually every requirement of the exacting large format worker, "Fine Materials for Fine Photography" would also be a suitable title. Bergger BPF 200 film, available in a wide range of...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

By far the most expensive component of printing your own digital images is the cost of consumables--ink and paper. There are plenty of paper options out there that range from very reasonable to extremely expensive, and I'll take a look at these in a future column. With paper, you're kind of stuck with paying for the type and look you want. Ink, however, is a...

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C.A. Boylan Posted: May 01, 2008 1 comments

Tamrac's Adventure 10 Photo/Laptop Backpack
The Tamrac Adventure 10 gear carrier is a lightweight, uniquely-designed backpack that combines a functional camera bag, comfortable daypack, and computer backpack in one easy-to-carry pack. It holds camera equipment, personal items, and laptops with up to 17" screens and, for security, does not look like...

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C.A. Boylan Posted: Feb 01, 2011 1 comments

PocketWizard MiniTT1 And FlexTT5 For Nikon
Made for use with Nikon D-SLR cameras, the MiniTT1 transmitter slides into the camera’s hot shoe and measures just 2.8x1.9x1.3”. The FlexTT5 transceiver measures 3.6x2.9x1.4”. This system can be used to control single or multiple off-camera Nikon i-TTL flash units. The firmware is upgradeable and other accessories...

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C.A. Boylan Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

Delkin's 305X UDMA CompactFlash PRO Cards
Delkin has released their 305X UDMA CompactFlash PRO cards and accessories. The cards feature high read/write speeds with a transfer capability of 45MB per second. The UDMA CompactFlash PRO cards are available in the following capacities: 1GB ($79.99), 2GB ($109.99), 4GB ($179.99), and 8GB ($299.99). Delkin also...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 11, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments
If you, like me, had come to associate “watercolor” with a stippled and rough surface, my first tip on this paper is not to be concerned with the moniker. It is a somewhat rough surface, but more in its tooth than its topography, and is more akin to high-quality painting stock than some of the stuff that had been passed off as watercolor inkjet in the past. And while this paper might be aimed at the “fine art” market (reproduction of paintings and drawings for portfolios and presentation and possible sale) it is also quite apt for photographers who want rich color on an “archival,” matte/textured surface. Epson describes the surface as “unique,” and you can feel and “hear” the surface as you run your thumb over it. I found that while the surface texture is somewhat rough it does not intrude on the ink laydown; in fact, it seems to enhance it.
Peter K. Burian Posted: Jul 01, 2005 0 comments

Epson has unveiled a new line of printers employing an eight-color pigment-based UltraChrome K3 inkset system. All of the new machines employ the same K3 inks, print heads, and driver software, but differ in size, cartridge size, and color calibration technology.

The suffix K3 refers to the fact that a full three--not merely two--black pigmented inks are...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

Let’s be honest. One thing no one would have expected at photokina was a unique new black-and-white silver halide process. But that’s what we got. Well, not exactly brand new. It’s a revival of a technology that hasn’t been seen in decades, quite possibly not in the lifetime of many of our readers: direct reversal paper.

Tom Fuller Posted: Oct 01, 1999 0 comments

Here I go again dating myself, but I remember going through packs of Kodak Athena, a double-weight contact paper with a lovely brown-black image. Actually, the tone varied daily from warm to neutral depending upon the condition of my fledgling technique...

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 01, 2007 0 comments

The digital trend these days seems to be film and silver halide print emulation. Not long ago we reviewed Alien Skin's Exposure software, which had push-button manipulation of digital images to make them look just as if they had been exposed on certain types of film. DxO's FilmPack, subject of a future review, offers similar image "looks." And at a recent...

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 08, 2012 1 comments
Ilford has relaunched their Galerie brand of inkjet papers, with one segment dubbed their “Prestige” brand. This is a first hands-on test of their Galerie Prestige Smooth High Gloss 215 gsm, based on pre-launch samples I was supplied.

In olden times printing papers were classed by weight, support (RC or fiber) grade (or VC, for variable contrast) and surface, and we’re beginning to see those classifications emerge again in the inkjet paper world, albeit in a different way than silver papers but nonetheless by weight and surface and support. If I were to classify this new Ilford Smooth High Gloss I’d call it a single weight, RC, and high gloss (Super F) "material", leaving grade aside of course as the contrast in digital is more determined by processing than paper grade.

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Feb 01, 2003 0 comments

Hard Or Soft?

Why do we need different contrast grades?
Because we don't all make perfect negatives. Paper grades allow us to compensate for negatives that are a bit too contrasty, or somewhat...

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Sep 14, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 11 comments
You can use Harman Direct Positive Paper (hereafter HDPP) in a whole spectrum of ways. At one end of the spectrum is the “Wow! Lookit!” of a school science project. At the other is a creative tool that will probably prove useful and profitable for some fine art photographers, and even some advertising photographers. We keep thinking of new ways to use it, but then again, you have to. It is a classic example of “creative limitation,”

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