Medium & Large Format Systems

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Joseph A. Dickerson Posted: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments

Many years ago, still fresh out of college, I worked with a 21/4x31/4" Century Graphic. I bought it used with three lenses and it was so cool. Pebble-grained gray leather covering, bright red bellows, and a coupled rangefinder. Wow, I naively...

Roger W. Hicks Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Perhaps the biggest surprise of the show, at least in conventional photography, was the new 35mm rangefinder stereo camera from Horseman. This shoots stereo pairs in the standard format--2x23x27mm in standard stereo mounts--so they can be projected or viewed with the binocular viewer that is supplied with the camera.

If the camera itself looks oddly...

Tom Fuller Posted: Jan 01, 2002 1 comments

Our project this month is a procedure for turning a 4x5, 5x7, or 8x10 view camera into a panoramic model that makes two or three images on a single sheet of film. Specialty cameras that produce these expansive views are available...

Joseph A. Dickerson Posted: Jan 01, 2004 0 comments

I don't recall just how many times I've gone through this, but it's more than a few. After much soul-searching, speculation, and fretting I decide I'm going to give up large format photography forever. It always seems like such a...

George Schaub Posted: Nov 01, 2002 0 comments

The trend toward lighter and durable materials for photo gear was, some say, started by the introduction of carbon-fiber materials for a usually cumbersome piece of equipment--a tripod. Make the tripod as strong and lighter and those who really know what a tripod is for, and why it's...

Roger W. Hicks Posted: Sep 01, 2005 0 comments

The Chinese-built, American-designed Fotoman 617 justifies itself as soon as you see the first transparencies on the light table. The huge format is a knockout. It's gorgeous. That vast slab of film is 21/4x62/3". That's 56x168mm, or over 11 times the area of 35mm.

It's ideal for scanning, too. Even a very modest flat-bed film scanner giving...

Jason Schneider Posted: Jan 01, 2006 0 comments

Just the other day a buddy of mine bought the Hasselblad he'd always wanted but couldn't afford at the unheard price of $475. It was a 20-year-old Hasselblad 500C/M, the functional equivalent of the current 500C/W. He purchased it from a private seller for $475 in near-mint condition, complete with 12-exposure back, waist-level finder, and 80mm f/2.8 Carl Zeiss...

Dan Havlik Posted: Sep 09, 2014 0 comments

Hasselblad has just announced a brand new medium format camera body: the Hasselblad H5X. The new H5X has been introduced, primarily, as an upgrade for photographers who use the older H1, H2, H2F and H4X but may now want the H5’s upgraded capability, Hasselblad said in making the announcement. The company also forsees the H5X being used as a backup body for photographers who already own the H5D.

Jason Schneider with Mark Kalan Posted: Apr 01, 2011 4 comments

The Hasselblad H4D-40 is a formidable piece of machinery in every respect.

Dan Havlik Posted: Jul 21, 2014 0 comments

Hasselblad's gone "back to the future" with a new digital back designed to bring its V System analog cameras into the 21st Century. Called the CFV-50c, the CMOS sensor-based back will sell for 11,000 Euros (approximately $14,900) and is designed to work with "almost every V camera made by the company since 1957," Hasselblad said

Uwe Steinmueller Posted: Jan 01, 2004 0 comments

With high-end 35mm digital SLRs currently sporting 11 to 14-megapixel resolution, some photographers ask the question: Is there still an advantage to medium format if you work only in digital?

The Hasselblad H1 answers that question. The H1 is both a film and a...

Jack Neubart With Linda Bohm & Gerard Marrazzo Posted: Sep 01, 2008 1 comments

The latest member of the H-series Hasselblad cameras is the H3DII, which takes digital photography and the H-series to new levels. With one version boasting an astounding 39 megapixels, this camera captures unrivaled detail. If you don't need that many pixels, the camera is also available with either a 22- or 31-megapixel sensor. I should also add that although we're...

Rick Shimonkevitz Posted: Aug 01, 2007 0 comments

As we journey further into cyberspace, it is inevitable that the oldest of methods for forming an image has found resurgence. Pinhole photography can be both fun and a serious pursuit. Notice the introduction of make-your-own pinhole camera kits as well as manufactured cameras for small and large formats. There is a published journal devoted to the craft and several websites...

Robert E. Mayer Posted: Feb 01, 2008 1 comments

There were two models of the versatile Mamiya Press medium format rangefinder cameras in the 1960s and '70s, the Universal Press and the Press Super 23. These cameras were designed to be more compact and in many respects more versatile than the bellows type 4x5 and 2x3 press cameras of that era, such as the Speed Graphic, Busch Pressman, and Linhof Technica. The main...

Steve Anchell Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

If you want to make an immediate improvement in your photography, move up to medium format. Not just because of the larger format, which will instantly provide better resolution and quality, whether you use digital or film; more importantly, the larger viewing screen will assist you in defining your subject and refining your composition. I have seen near instant improvement occur...

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