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Posted: Sep 20, 2007 0 comments

Industry Perspective

Turning Your Hobby Into Cash

By Ron Leach

While all Shutterbug readers are serious about imaging, some consider photography
a career while others shoot for the pure pleasure of the creative process. We
regularly hear from a third type of photographer: photo enthusiasts whodon&...

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Chuck Gloman Posted: Nov 17, 2012 0 comments
Rain or shine, you can always depend on an umbrella to give you soft, even illumination on your subjects. Whether using tungsten lighting, photofloods, or flash activated monolights, pointing the light into the umbrella will provide a controllable source of lighting. What follows are just some of the possibilities you have at your disposal with umbrellas. Changing the positioning of the unit(s), the output, the color of the umbrella, adding a gel and changing the background can make any subject a work of art.

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Posted: Aug 31, 2010 0 comments

Umbrellas Versus Soft Boxes

May The Best Modifier Win!

by Steve Bedell

You’re buying studio lights, maybe for the first time. After deciding which lights will fit your style and budget, you need to decide upon light modifiers. The two most common ones are umbrellas and soft boxes. Which should you buy and why? Andis...

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 17, 2012 1 comments
Portrait lighting sources have 4 major characteristics: color, direction, quantity and quality. When working with any light source, from speedlights to moonlights, the best way to improve the quality of your lighting is with modification devices such as an umbrella or a lightbank. Each one has their own advantages and disadvantages. But no matter which one you chose, each device is governed by this important rule. The closer a light source is to the subject the softer it is; the further away the light source is, the harder it becomes.

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Posted: Feb 23, 2010 0 comments

Industry Perspective

USB 3.0 to the Rescue

by Ron Leach

One of the bi-products of high-resolution digital cameras, terabyte hard drives, multi-gigabyte mobile phones, and D-SLRs with HD video capabilities is the ever-increasing need for greater bandwidth and faster data transfer rates. So it's none too soon that USB 3.0ha...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 17, 2013 1 comments
Macro photography is endlessly fascinating. It opens your eyes to a world that most people never notice. Taking photographs of small, intriguing subjects, especially in nature, can be a life-long pursuit. It’s endlessly captivating as you can see in (#1), the foot of a poison dart frog, and (#2), a close encounter with a caterpillar. Macro photography is very technical, though, and it must be approached correctly or you won’t be happy with the results.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Mar 15, 2012 0 comments
I’m sure you have been intrigued by the rainbow colors you can see in CDs and DVDs. As a visual person, it’s hard not to be attracted to these intense, supersaturated colors. I’ve tried to photograph them but was never happy with the results until I experimented with placing drops of water on the surface of the disc. That changed everything. The colors of the CD combined with the defined shapes of the drops in amazing ways, and this was even more captivating than just seeing color in the disc.
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George Schaub Posted: May 31, 2011 1 comments

Imagine yourself walking into a room where there are numerous objects covered with small mirrors. The mirrors follow the form and shape of the objects. The walls of the room have a slot that goes continuously around the entire room. Behind the slot is a light that shines into the room and that travels the entire distance, from wall to wall. As the light travels it passes through numerous color filters built into the slot. The light reflects off the mirror facets on the objects. You can also move throughout the room and observe the objects and the light by standing with the light coming in over your shoulder, from the side or even standing behind the objects as the light hits them.

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George Schaub Posted: May 30, 2006 0 comments

In Brief

WD Passport Portable USB Drives

by George Schaub

It's clear that having a backup strategy when on the road can often make
the difference in image insurance. While downloading to your laptop to clear
your memory cards is now standard operating procedure, you should also consider
burni...

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Posted: Nov 30, 2010 0 comments

Industry Perspective

Wearable Cameras for the Masses

by Ron Leach

Once solely the purview of those engaged in espionage, tiny wearable cameras have gone mainstream in the digital age and are now attracting attention by extreme sports enthusiasts, law enforcement professionals, soccer moms, medical practitioners and thegen...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 26, 2004 0 comments

Scene modes are pre-programmed "suggestions" for setting up your digital camera for specific subjects. Many digital cameras have Scene modes located in their screen menus, while others have them on the command dial of the camera itself. Scene modes include Sports (also known as Action, for making pictures with as fast a shutter...

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 30, 2007 0 comments

What Happened to My Images ??!!



Corrupted Disks and Rescue Strategies

by George Schaub

I am not sure if it's happened to you, but it's happened to me.
After having spent an afternoon shooting with my digital camera everything suddenly
stopped. While the counter in my camera LED showed that I hadple...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 17, 2011 0 comments
Many photographers use the term white light without knowing its precise definition in photography. After all, there are many types of lighting that we could be talking about, such as the sun, the lamps in our living room, fluorescent fixtures, open shade on an overcast day, late afternoon sunlight, a mercury vapor street lamp, or flash. Which one of these should set the standard by which we judge all other light?
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Posted: Dec 25, 2007 0 comments

What's My Used Camera Worth?

by George Schaub

As film cameras go down in sales and digital camera sales soar, many photographers
wonder just what their film, and indeed older digital cameras are worth. We
get emails almost every day with such queries, and while we do not or cannot
set the market price for any goods...

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Ron Leach Posted: Mar 19, 2012 0 comments
The Future of Photography Museum Amsterdam (FOAM) recently celebrated its 10th anniversary with an exhibit and series of activities reflecting upon the future of our craft. The organization’s mission is to enable people throughout the world to experience and enjoy photography—whether it's at their museum in Amsterdam, on their website (www.foam.org), or via their internationally distributed magazine.

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