The Darkroom
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The Darkroom
Darryl C. Nicholas Oct 01, 2002 0 comments

The next step is to lay in a circular gradient on the top layer. I thought a gradient that would go from white in the center to dark blue in the corners would look nice. So, I selected Blue (Red=0, Green=24, Blue=70...or, 0, 24, 70). That is a nice, dark, blue. Set that for the background color...

The Darkroom
Darryl C. Nicholas Jun 01, 2000 0 comments

There are two methods of
making prints from slides. One uses the paper and chemicals manufactured
only by Ilford and known as Ilfochrome. The other uses paper and chemicals
made by many different companies and referred...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz Aug 01, 2003 0 comments

The Darkroom

Everyone gets them: negs that just won't print. Sometimes, you can see why: they are hopelessly thin; far too contrasty; or flat and muddy. At other times, they look fine. You can have plenty of detail, just the...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz Nov 01, 2002 3 comments

A good darkroom is a joy to work in. A bad darkroom can be so inconvenient and uncomfortable that you find excuses not to use it, and at its worst, it can even endanger your health.

Ten years ago, my husband Roger...

The Darkroom
Darryl C. Nicholas Mar 01, 2004 2 comments

All of us take snapshots. Sometimes those snapshots can be turned into very nice portraits. Take a look at one of my snapshots (#1). Actually, this snapshot was taken of my wife Faye and I, one night when we were out celebrating our son's wedding.

The Darkroom
Darryl C. Nicholas Feb 01, 2002 1 comments

Believe it or not, a color
enlarger is one of the best you can use if you want to print black and
white negatives. This is especially true if you want to print onto variable
contrast black and white paper. Now, to be totally accurate, a variable...

The Darkroom
Darryl C. Nicholas Aug 01, 2000 0 comments

The Beginners Method.
You'll need three trays; a black and white enlarger; a red, green, and
blue filter; some of the special, ambient temperature, color chemicals;
and, of course, some color printing paper.

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz Sep 01, 2005 14 comments

After looking at the prints I had just given her, my neighbor Genevieve said, "I have never seen prints of these photographs before."

It all started when she showed me a box of 6x4.5cm glass plates from 1923-'35. It was a collection of family photos of her father, aunt, and uncle when they were small children. In France glass plates were used for far...

The Darkroom
Darryl C. Nicholas Jan 01, 1998 0 comments

Processing with C-41 is relatively
easy to perform. The chemicals involved are not overly sensitive or
difficult to work with. In fact, even the time and temperatures involved
are not real critical. If the time and/orte...

The Darkroom
Darryl C. Nicholas Sep 01, 2004 1 comments

One of the secrets to making great ink jet prints is to set the black point correctly in the image file before sending the image to the printer. The black point in an image is the group of pixels that should be printed as solid, D-max, black. If this...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz May 01, 2002 1 comments

One of the never-ending
fascinations of darkroom work is the way in which you can manipulate your
images. Two effects in particular, softening and vignetting, can give
you lovely, vintage looking pictures with a minimum of effort. Both tend
to...

The Darkroom
Darryl C. Nicholas Dec 01, 2000 0 comments

While conventional photography
(as opposed to digital) continues to be the main stream of the industry,
conventional darkroom activity has declined over the past few years. Today,
most conventional darkroom activity seems to be in the area of fine art...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz Nov 01, 2005 2 comments

The way the battle lines are drawn, you might think that all photographers are committed exclusively to silver halide or exclusively to digital and n'er the twain shall meet. It isn't so. In reality the twain have met. More and more photographers weave seamlessly between the two without a thought. It's only the die-hards in each camp that refuse to acknowledge...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz May 01, 2005 1 comments

Photos © 2004, Frances E. Schultz, All Rights Reserved

How brown do you like your toast? The answer, of course, is "It depends." What kind of bread is it? How old is the bread? How thick? What are you going to put on it? How are you feeling at the time? You can't make hard and fast rules, even for yourself. It's even harder to make toast for...

The Darkroom
Frances E. Schultz Jun 01, 2004 0 comments

Wrinkles or character lines? Few people want their portraits to show every line on their face. The camera may not...