Lighting Equipment

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Ron Eggers Posted: Dec 01, 2006 0 comments

One of the difficulties of getting involved in studio work is trying to figure out where to begin. There are so many different lighting systems and so many equipment options available that it's not easy to figure out what's essential, what might be nice to have, and what really isn't necessary, at least when you first begin. Just what type of lighting do you need...

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Jay Abend Posted: Dec 01, 2001 0 comments

When a photographer hears the name "Photogenic Machine Company," he or she immediately thinks of small rugged AC-powered flash units used primarily by portrait photographers. Photogenic Powerlights have been around for decades, and have...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Jan 25, 2013 Published: Dec 01, 2012 40 comments
Fresnel lenses are used to focus light. Many of the Hollywood glamour photographers of the 1930s and ’40s used them, most notably George Hurrell for his portraits of many of the screen legends of that era. Hurrell used 8x10 cameras, uncoated lenses, and bulky Mole-Richardson hot lights. You don’t have to go that route, but you can now replicate some of the lighting effects with this new offering from Photogenic.
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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments

Photogenic's StudioMax II is the kind of monolight I've been trying to find for a long time. It's lightweight, powerful, and accepts battery power so it can be used on locations where the nearest AC outlet is a city block or county away.

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Ron Eggers Posted: Jan 01, 2007 0 comments

Wireless flash control is really big right now. For a long time, wireless systems primarily used slave triggering or infrared technology to fire strobes remotely. Increasingly, though, RF (Radio Frequency) systems are becoming the norm. RF systems, which generally provide multiple frequencies, make it possible to have a number of different photographers shooting with their own...

Roger W. Hicks Posted: Apr 05, 2013 Published: Mar 01, 2013 0 comments
Roger Hicks’s “Pro Lighting Report” is part of our continuing series of reports from the photokina show. With a giant hall filled with lighting products, Roger reports here on what caught his eye and what he saw as the key trends at the show. We will continue with new lighting product reports in coming issues, with a special report coming out of the WPPI show held in March, and will catch up on more new products not mentioned here then. We consider lighting a key issue for all photographers and will have more tests ahead throughout the year.—Editor
Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 27, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 0 comments
The Phottix Odin is a radio frequency-controlled system, or simply radio remote. The basic package includes two units: a transmitter and a receiver. Additional receivers are optional. You only need one transmitter to sit in the camera’s hot shoe and trigger compatible i-TTL strobes, but you need a receiver for each off-camera flash. And recently, Phottix introduced a new combo pack that includes one additional receiver—perfect for my two-speedlight setups. The unit tested here is for Nikon and I worked with my Nikon SB-900 speedlights.
Shutterbug Staff Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

As part of our annual Photo Marketing Association (PMA) coverage we ask our reporters to deliver a "Best of Show" award. While each contributor had their own beat, we also asked them to go beyond their respective area of coverage to find what, for them, signified a breakthrough product, technology, or new trend that they felt would affect all photographers in the...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

It appears someone hit the dimmer switch when it came to lighting this year: the number of entries was sporadic, at best. But the good news is that there were a few shining lights. In strobe lighting the focus was entirely on self-contained monopacs, notably in lighting designed with digital control, smaller and easier-to-use lights, and one super-lightweight battery...

Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

This year we’re seeing a surprising number of new ringlights plus lots of accessory light modifiers, dedicated cords, flash brackets, and continuous LED lights which are helpful when making videos with multipurpose D-SLR cameras.

Aputure’s Trigmaster makes controlling a studio strobe or Speedlight wirelessly easier at distances of up to 300 feet with 16 different...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

This year saw few major product launches in studio lighting, although we did manage to uncover some interesting lights and accessories nonetheless.

Dot Line Corp./RPS Studio introduced the Complete 7-in-1 Reflector. This folding reflector comes with a translucent panel, white, silver, sunlight (a mix of gold and silver), and gold reflectors, plus an 18 percent gray target for...

Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 25, 2014 Published: Mar 01, 2014 1 comments
For the studio photographer on location or shooting environmental portraits, connecting a studio strobe to a battery pack, battery-driven power pack, or pure sine wave inverter frees one of the constraints of plugging into an AC outlet and worrying about tripping circuit breakers or blowing a fuse, and it removes wires that could prove hazardous (combined with wireless syncing of the flash, I might add). And wedding and event photographers who rely on portable strobes that run entirely on external battery power are well familiar with the benefits—power that lasts and keeps pace with the event. There are countless choices, whether you’re just starting out or looking to upgrade or expand your lighting system.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

When you need the power and versatility of a studio strobe for location shooting and environmental portraiture but don’t want to schlep around a large, heavy studio system, you can turn to a portable lighting kit.

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Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Riddle me this: What's the hardest thing to find on any location shoot? If you said, "clients who were on time," that would be partially true, but the correct answer is--an AC power outlet. They're even more difficult to find if you're at the beach, in a park, or as I often find myself, on a racetrack somewhere. One of the niftiest solutions...

Steve Bedell Posted: Oct 11, 2013 Published: Sep 01, 2013 0 comments
“Look Ma, no cords!” That’s right; the Priolite does not have a power cord. It is run strictly off battery power. Each unit has its own interchangeable and removable battery, plus a built-in receiver to work with a Priolite transmitter. And, unlike most monolights, it has a usable modeling light even on battery power.

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