Lighting Equipment

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2001 0 comments

Still the only independent lens maker to design and produce 35mm SLR cameras, Sigma continues developing and upgrading their line. Replacing the previous SA-5, two new models were recently introduced. The SA-9 and the SA-7 are very similar in...

Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 07, 2013 Published: Jan 01, 2013 1 comments
The Nissin Di622 Mark II offered some notable improvements over the original Di622, but that flash didn’t offer the firepower of the Nissin flagship Di866 Professional. So I was curious and eager to see what the new Di866 Mark II Professional had in store.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2009 0 comments

Wow! That’s all I need to say about the new Nissin Di866 shoe-mount flash. This baby has to be experienced to be believed. I was impressed with the other flash units Nissin first sent me, but this new flash sets new standards in technology and user-friendliness. For starters, the Di866 features wireless TTL that lets me take advantage of the latest camera/flash exposure advances. Second, it...

Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 30, 2013 Published: Jul 01, 2013 0 comments
The Nissin MF18 fully supports Nikon’s i-TTL autoexposure as well as Canon’s E-TTL system. I tested with the Nikon 60mm Micro, but also had success with a zoom, namely the Tamron 70-300mm with a Marumi DHG Achromat Macro (plus-diopter) lens attached, both on my Nikon D300. Much of my close-up work with the MF18 involved Manual shooting mode set on the camera for tighter exposure control, and manual focus.
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Jay Abend Posted: Nov 01, 2001 0 comments

Macro photography seems to be in a golden age. Maybe it's the proliferation of digital point-and-shoot cameras with incredible macro focusing capabilities. Maybe it's the new breed of inexpensive macro zoom lenses, or maybe...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Aug 25, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 0 comments
Photography is all about light and photographers are always looking at ways to modify it. Visit any studio of a working pro and you’re bound to see softboxes, umbrellas, cones, snoots, grids, beauty dishes, parabolic reflectors, etc. Each has their purpose in changing the shape and/or character of the light. Using the same light source, you can modify it from a sharp, harsh, point light source with distinct shadows to a soft, even light source with very little or no shadows. With that in mind I decided to give one of these modifiers a test, the Paul C. Buff PLM v.2.
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Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 07, 2012 Published: Mar 01, 2012 0 comments
Let me tell you about my first experience with a Vagabond Mini. I was teaching one of my lighting workshops, using a flash unit with its battery pack. The light and battery pack were a kit I’d purchased as a combo. We’d been shooting a while and the battery pack was almost dead when one of the other photographers there told me he had a Vagabond Mini in the car. We unhooked my dead battery, and using the AC power cord from the flash unit, proceeded to just plug in to the Mini and keep on shooting! And shooting, and shooting… You see, this thing really supplies a lot of flashes and can be used with many flash units. But let’s start at the beginning…
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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Nov 01, 2001 0 comments

The recently introduced Photographer's Warehouse PerforMax AK4001 MLC AC/DC electronic flash is similar in appearance to this firm's previous monolight models, but includes one major difference. This new model can operate on...

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 02, 2011 Published: Sep 01, 2011 0 comments
If Dustin Hoffman’s character in The Graduate were graduating from photo school this year, the advice he would be getting instead of “plastics” would be “speedlights,” and why not? When compared to a monolight, the biggest advantage of using a shoe-mount flash is that they’re small and portable, which means you can take them anywhere. Today’s shoe-mount flashes—or speedlights as camera manufacturers like to call them—are sophisticated, seamlessly blending natural light and flash as well as having the ability to group several flashes together, trip them wirelessly, all the while calculating the correct exposure.
Joe Farace Posted: Dec 03, 2013 Published: Oct 01, 2013 0 comments
When I first saw the battery-powered Photoflex TritonFlash at a pro show I was impressed as much by its power output and flexibility as its tiny size. Available in a kit that includes one of the company’s light banks along with everything—except a light stand—the setup can get you started making portraits in the studio or on location with nary an electrical outlet in sight.
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Ron Eggers Posted: Apr 01, 2007 0 comments

Photoflex's newest lighting series are the LiteDome Kits, versatile softboxes that have been designed for strobe lights using the proprietary Photoflex Strobe Connector. There are a number of things that the LiteDome Kit has going for it, including portability, power, and outstanding performance. Even though it's being targeted at all levels of photographers...

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Ron Eggers Posted: Dec 01, 2006 0 comments

One of the difficulties of getting involved in studio work is trying to figure out where to begin. There are so many different lighting systems and so many equipment options available that it's not easy to figure out what's essential, what might be nice to have, and what really isn't necessary, at least when you first begin. Just what type of lighting do you need...

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Jay Abend Posted: Dec 01, 2001 0 comments

When a photographer hears the name "Photogenic Machine Company," he or she immediately thinks of small rugged AC-powered flash units used primarily by portrait photographers. Photogenic Powerlights have been around for decades, and have...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Jan 25, 2013 Published: Dec 01, 2012 9 comments
Fresnel lenses are used to focus light. Many of the Hollywood glamour photographers of the 1930s and ’40s used them, most notably George Hurrell for his portraits of many of the screen legends of that era. Hurrell used 8x10 cameras, uncoated lenses, and bulky Mole-Richardson hot lights. You don’t have to go that route, but you can now replicate some of the lighting effects with this new offering from Photogenic.
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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments

Photogenic's StudioMax II is the kind of monolight I've been trying to find for a long time. It's lightweight, powerful, and accepts battery power so it can be used on locations where the nearest AC outlet is a city block or county away.

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