Lighting Equipment

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C.A. Boylan Posted: Jan 05, 2012 Published: Nov 01, 2011 0 comments
Graslon Prodigy And Insight Flash Diffusers
Made in the U.S.A., Graslon’s Prodigy and Insight flash diffusers were designed to provide softer shadows than traditional portable diffusers. Graslon diffusers feature an optical reflector system that redistributes the light before sending it through the lens. They also have a universal nonslip mounting system and a variety of interchangeable diffusion lenses, including flat, dome, and amber. The Prodigy line offers a large 8x5” diffusion surface, while the Insight line offers a smaller 6x4” diffusion surface.
C.A. Boylan Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

Savage Universal's Light Kits
Savage Universal has added two new light kits to their line of photographic equipment. The M31500 and M31100 kits include three variable power light heads with a quartz light bulb in each, three 24x24" softboxes, three four-section stands, and three 10-foot AC power cords with a carrying case. The kits are designed...

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C.A. Boylan Posted: Nov 01, 2010 0 comments

In keeping with our lighting theme this month, our Roundup entries cover the lighting gear and accessories beat. Keep in mind that Roundup is not a test report per se, but a place where we get to provide information supplied by manufacturers on new products and services.—Editor

Flashpoint Monolights
The “M” series is the latest...

John Rettie Posted: Mar 01, 2002 0 comments

If you think that the lack of battery life is a new phenomenon that has only come to the forefront since digital cameras hit the market, you're wrong. Long-time photographers will tell you it was the advent of electronic flash guns that triggered...

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Tom Fuller Posted: Jun 01, 2000 0 comments

Our do-it-yourself project this month is a studio broadlight particularly suitable for portraiture. Unlike point source lights diffused with fabric coverings, this mammoth fixture uses 16 100w bulbs, arranged in a grid within a wooden box, to flood...

Joe Farace Posted: Apr 11, 2014 Published: Mar 01, 2014 1 comments
First impressions: the D-Lite RX ONE To Go Kit includes a pair of Elinchrom monolights so you know it’s going to contain quality products. Then you discover that the maximum output of each light is 100 watt seconds and you start to think you’ll need more power. That’s until you’re reminded that this fully loaded two-monolight Elinchrom kit sells for less than $700. Interested now?
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Steve Bedell Posted: Oct 01, 2002 0 comments

Like most photographers, I've got a bunch of lights and all kinds of light modifiers lying around. I've got softboxes, umbrellas, and assorted parabolic reflectors. They range in color from white to silver, gold to flesh colored.

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

One of the mysteries of photography is Depth Of Field (DOF). It combines various factors, including camera to subject distance, focal length of the lens and aperture in use. You calculate all of the above and know what will appear sharp and unsharp in the image. Those who use fixed focal length lenses have had the advantage of having a DOF scale on the lens, which yields...

Joe Farace Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

“Something you threw together in crafts class, Princess?”—Buck Rogers in the 25th century

As a kid during the 1950s, I had one of the last Buck Rogers ray guns produced. These were actually flashlights made by Norton Honer but were designed to look like Buck’s ray gun. It’s only fitting that ExpoImaging’s Ray Flash ringlight converter projects light as...

Steve Bedell Posted: Nov 26, 2013 Published: Oct 01, 2013 1 comments
Portrait photographers are constantly looking for new lighting gear that will make their lives easier and produce great results. And while flash photography has been the studio standard for many years, it’s always been more difficult to previsualize the final effect since the image you see using the modeling lights is not always the same you see once the flash fires. The instant feedback of digital cameras has lessened that worry some, but you can still be in for some surprises. The new breed of LED lights eliminates most of these concerns with true WYSIWYG lighting, and with that in mind I was eager to check out F&V’s new K4000 LED Studio Panel to see how it could be used in my work.
Jay Abend Posted: May 01, 2001 0 comments

Over the years I've seen a lot of weird and bizarre photo products. While the photo market is a relatively modest niche all by itself, there are always those willing to cater to the sub-niches and micro-niches within. When a Flashkon 2000...

Joe Farace Posted: Feb 04, 2014 Published: Dec 01, 2013 0 comments
Lester A. Dine invented the ringlight for making dental photos in 1952 but today people use them for all kinds of photography. A ringlight is a circular light source that surrounds the optical axis of a lens causing light to hit the subject from different angles, producing soft shadows in much the same manner as a light bank. When photographing people, the unique way that a ring flash renders light also produces a shadowy halo around the subject that’s much beloved by fashion photographers. I use a small ring flash to photograph butterflies, but if you want to photograph people, to paraphrase Jaws Chief Brody, “You’re gonna need a bigger light.”
Joe Farace Posted: Sep 20, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 1 comments
LEDs may represent the future of studio lighting but a number of the currently available options come with a caveat or two for the new professional or aspiring pro. Some LED solutions are affordable but may be too physically small for efficient use in a studio, or they may be large enough but too expensive for the shooter who just wants to dip their toes into the LED waters. Measuring 14x7.5x2.75” and costing less than $200, Flashpoint’s 500C LED Light appears to be a good solution for the LED newbie who wants to see what all the fuss is about.
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Joe Farace Posted: Apr 26, 2013 Published: Mar 01, 2013 0 comments
The important characteristics of any studio lighting system are the quantity, quality, and color of the light they produce. Other factors such as recycle time, type of output control, build quality, and the ability to accept accessories may be crucial, but for many of us the most essential element is price. I was impressed by previous Flashpoint monolights (April, 2012, issue of Shutterbug) because they’re rugged, dependable, and significantly, for the advanced amateur and aspiring pro, inexpensive. Now Flashpoint has introduced a new family of monolights—the DG series—that builds upon all of the positive aspects of previous models and takes them in a new direction.
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Joe Farace Posted: May 14, 2012 Published: Apr 01, 2012 1 comments
A monolight is a self-contained studio flash that consists of a power supply, flash head, and modeling light wrapped up inside a single housing. Monolights are typically powered by AC current but there are times on location when an electrical outlet may not be so conveniently located and long extension cords can create safety hazards, even when securely fastened down. I’ve had people trip over taped cords and believe me, it can ruin your day. That’s why a new breed of monolights, such as Adorama’s Flashpoint II monolights, offer a DC option with a battery pack when you might be out standing in a field or, at one time during my tests, in a big parking lot. A switch lets you choose between AC or DC power provided by a dedicated Ni-MH battery pack that measures 7x7x3” and weighs 2.65 lbs.

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