Lighting Equipment

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Jay Abend Posted: May 01, 2002 0 comments

In my quixotic search to find the perfect location strobe system I've used and owned practically everything--including dry-cell powered Matadors in the 1970s to Norman 200bs in the '80s to Lumedynes and Hensels in the '90s, I've tried everything.

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Steve Anchell Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

When I was operating a commercial studio in Hollywood, California, my prized possession was a Swiss-made Broncolor 2400 ws power pack and three lamp heads.

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 21, 2011 Published: Nov 01, 2011 0 comments
Photographic umbrellas are the simplest and most inexpensive form of light modifier available and that makes them the most popular, too. Photographic umbrellas look and act just like rain umbrellas except they’re reflective and light is bounced into or shot through them, creating a big, soft light source that’s aimed at the subject. And size does matter. As photographers we live by a few important lighting rules: the closer and larger a light source is to a subject, the softer the lighting effect will be. Conversely, the smaller and further away a light source is from the subject, the harder the lighting becomes. That old lighting rule that “size matters” is important here because a large umbrella is going to produce broader, softer light for your portraits.
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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

I have been using Westcott's light banks and umbrellas for glamour, fashion, and portraiture almost since the company entered the photographic business and have always been impressed by their quality and value. Previously I used their rugged and flexible Spiderlite family of hot and cold continuous lighting products and now they've introduced a line of monolights built...

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Jay Abend Posted: Aug 01, 2004 1 comments

White Lightning strobes almost single-handedly revolutionized the studio strobe world. With their first coffee-can shaped WL10,000 more than 20 years ago, Paul C. Buff and company brought serious strobe lighting gear to a whole new generation of...

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Steve Anchell Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

The first time I met a wireless radio trigger was while writing a review of White Lightning monolights, circa 1998. The Paul C. Buff company sent a RadioRemote One transmitter and four receivers to use with their lights, so I decided to give them a try just to see what they could do. By the time I was through I had purchased the lights from Paul C. Buff, not because I needed more...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Nov 01, 2011 Published: Sep 01, 2011 1 comments
There are few things in digital photography more frustrating than problems with color fidelity. One of the most commonly heard complaints is “my prints don’t match my display.” While color accuracy is improved with LCD displays, it isn’t perfect by any means, and if you’re serious about your photography it’s important to calibrate your monitor. And, if you do your own printing, you’ll often find that you can improve the quality of your prints with profiles built specifically for your printer and paper selection.
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Steve Bedell Posted: Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

When asked to do a report on the LiteShaper, I said, "Great." I'd seen the product mentioned in previous Shutterbug issues and it looked very interesting and unique. A box full of several LiteShaper panels and a couple of softboxes soon arrived on my doorstep. I worked with small- and medium-sized Chimera softboxes. After putting the boxes together and adding the...

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Stan Sholik Posted: Jun 01, 2009 0 comments

AC-powered electronic flash units fall into two distinct categories: systems with a power pack to which individual heads are connected, and self-contained units where the power unit is a part of the head itself.

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