Lighting Equipment

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 15, 2013 Published: Sep 01, 2013 0 comments
Mary and I have fond memories of using early generation Bowens monolights; they were our first really “good” lighting system when we set up our studio in 1982. We loved shooting with those big, black, paint-can-shaped 800B monolights because they were inexpensive, dependable, and powerful. From what I can tell from my tests of their two-light Gemini 400Rx Kit that continues to be the case.
Joe Farace Posted: Mar 11, 2014 Published: Jan 01, 2014 0 comments
These days it seems that using LED lighting systems for studio portraiture is like puppies and kittens—everybody loves them, and why not? All you need to do is turn on an LED light panel and shoot, right? While there’s obviously more to it than that, the WYSIWYG nature of LED lighting is especially helpful for new or aspiring pros who want to get up and running quickly or in applications where the lighting needs to be consistent so lots of portraits can be made in a short amount of time, something event photographers will take to heart. With that in mind I recently tested Bowens’ Mosaic LED light panels (#1). Originally developed for film and video use, they are available in models designed for mounting on traditional light stands for portraiture, so I put them to work in my home studio.
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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2004 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Joe Farace, All Rights Reserved

OK, I'll be the first one to admit that I'm a klutz. I like to work with long lenses (an 85mm lens is short to me) and am constantly backing up into whatever boyfriend, husband, or hanger-on that models feel...

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Ron Eggers and Stan Sholik Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

Bowens, a leading provider of lighting equipment and related accessories, is adding two new lights to its Esprit Gemini monobloc line: the Esprit Gemini Digital 250 (GM250) and the Esprit Gemini Digital 500 (GM500), which was the one tested here. While they are called digital units, they aren't targeted specifically at photographers who shoot digitally and are just as...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

The Travel-Pak battery is a take-anywhere power source that comes with a handy carrying handle and case with shoulder strap. Note the two outlets; both 500 ws heads or one at a time can be used.

The Gemini kit is composed of two flash heads (monoblocs), two heavy-duty 9-foot stands, two umbrella reflectors, two umbrellas, all cords, bulbs, and cables, as well as a...

Joe Farace Posted: May 02, 2014 Published: Mar 01, 2014 0 comments
There is something quietly satisfying about working with finely crafted tools. It’s a feeling I remember having back in the film days when making photographs with my first Hasselblad 500C/M camera and one I had again while shooting with Broncolor’s Move 1200 L Outdoor Kit 2. It made creating all of the images that you see here easier and fun to shoot, and it’s in this spirit of play where creativity lives, inspiring a photographer to try new ways to make better photographs. Broncolor’s Move Kit is just that kind of lighting system.
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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 10, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 1 comments
The monolights that I’ve recently tested for Shutterbug combine power supply and flash head into a single unit. Handy, but an alternative approach is using power pack and flash head systems, such as those made by Broncolor (www.bronimaging.com), who offer these components as individual units that can be mixed and matched to produce different lighting setups.
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Steve Bedell Posted: Jun 01, 2011 7 comments

I’m not an equipment snob. That applies to both cameras and lighting gear. I’ve always believed that it’s that gray matter in back of your eyeball that determines whether or not you get a decent image, not the price tag on your gear. I like fast lenses and dislike variable apertures, so I pay for them. With lighting equipment, higher prices usually mean more power, more features and flexibility, and better construction. With that in mind, let’s see what the very reasonably priced Genesis 300 B monolight ($399 with battery) from Calumet offers.

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 08, 2011 Published: Nov 01, 2011 1 comments
It’s called “continuous lighting” because it’s on continuously, much like a light bulb or the sun for that matter, enabling you to use your in-camera meter to measure the light falling on your subject. Continuous lighting lets you see how all of the light—shadows and highlights—is falling on your subject, but continuous sources sometimes use quartz or photoflood bulbs that can be hot, even dangerously so, leading to the use of the term “hot lights” to describe them. An increasing number of continuous lighting tools are now being made using other kinds of light sources, even LED, producing cool “hot” lights. And that brings us to the subject of this review—the Calumet (www.calumetphoto.com) Pro Series LED Panel Light.
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Joe Farace Posted: Jul 01, 2002 0 comments

If you're a location photographer who needs a lighting kit that's lightweight, rugged, and can handle whatever kind of assignment that gets thrown at it, Calumet's Travelite 750 One-Head Umbrella Kit may be just what you need. With a price tag under $550...

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Jay Abend Posted: Oct 01, 2004 0 comments

Shooting with powerful studio style flash units has always meant dealing with the dreadful PC sync cord. That horrible little PC sync connection on your camera hasn't changed much in the past 60 years, and it remains the least reliable link in the world of most studio photographers.

Like most pros, I adopted a strictly...

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Ron Eggers and Stan Sholik Posted: Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

Serious lighting equipment isn't just for high-paid commercial photographers anymore. There are a growing number of new, sophisticated, electronic lighting systems available that meet the needs and budgets of most serious photographers, including those who previously would never have considered acquiring professional-type flash systems.

One reason that...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Oct 01, 2002 0 comments

When you have lots of small items to photograph in minute detail, a ringlight is the easiest method of producing consistent results with soft, gentle lighting that shows the item most advantageously. Instead of having distracting shadows such as...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Apr 12, 2012 Published: May 01, 2012 20 comments
Photographers all have their favorite light modifiers. Some like umbrellas, some softboxes, others parabolics, and then there’s the beauty dish, which seems to be a combination of a softbox and a parabolic. For those not familiar with the beauty dish, it’s a round but narrow modifier that you attach to your light. Think of it as a parabolic reflector painted white inside and flattened. If you stopped there, and you could, you’d have a pretty harsh light that makes a well-defined circular pattern with distinct shadows. But there is another little modification that makes a very big difference and also softens the light considerably while still maintaining that circular pattern. There is a bulb cover or center bounce dish that blocks the direct light from the flash and bounces it back into the dish. When used this way, the light output sits midway between a softbox and a parabolic.
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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

Manufacturers/Distributors

Argraph Corporation (Sunblitz)
111 Asia Pl.
Carlstadt, NJ 07072
(201) 939-7722
www.argraph.com

Nikon Inc.
1300 Walt Whitman Rd.
Melville, NY 11747
(800) 645-6687
http://www.nikonusa.com"...

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