Accessories

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The Editors Posted: Aug 01, 2009 10 comments

The best imaging products of 2009 were voted on at the Technical Image Press Association (TIPA) General Assembly held from April 2-4, 2009 in Budapest.

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Christopher Dack Posted: Aug 28, 2012 Published: Jul 01, 2012 2 comments
Recent years have seen staggering innovations in cameras, most notably involving ISO speed, sensor size in compacts, and video capabilities. Despite these advances, however, one thing has divided the industry for more than 10 years but has rarely been talked about—that is, until recently—optical low-pass filters. Many cameras include them, but some do not. There are believers in both camps but the only thing that’s clear is that the issue is far from decided.
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Peter K. Burian Posted: Aug 01, 2000 1 comments

Although most lens manufacturers offer fast (f/2.8) ultra-wide zoom lenses, these tend to be large, heavy, and quite expensive. Tokina's own AF 20-35mm f/2.8 AT-X PRO is a superb product but most photo enthusiasts do not require such a wide aperture...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2009 16 comments

If there’s any secret about making great travel photographs it’s that using your camera has to be instinctive because when a photo opportunity presents itself you may only have a few seconds to get a shot.

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

Slingshots may seem like odd travel accessories, but these SlingShots are two dispatch rider-style backpacks--also known as bandoleer bags and, yes, sling bags--from Lowepro.

They are part of the "Designed for Digital" range, but don't let that worry you: they are at least as good for film cameras. Yes, they are designed especially for...

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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

There are those situations when you can't (or don't want to) carry a tripod or there's just not enough space to set one up. That's when a monopod comes in handy. Monopods are the ideal camera support for nature photographers and backpackers, to who size and weight are important considerations. A monopod is especially useful when working with long lenses in...

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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Feb 01, 2010 0 comments

We have covered a wide range of tripod offerings in the past so we thought that we’d look a bit deeper into this realm with some suggestions on accessories to make the most of your tripod when on the road.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 02, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 0 comments
Just as interchangeable lenses on an SLR each have a specific purpose or meet a certain need, the same applies to tripod heads. Even if a head comes as part of the tripod kit, you soon realize you may need to replace or supplement it. In this buyer’s guide to tripod heads we’ll look at some of the factors to consider, including budget, load considerations, applications, and matching heads to “sticks.” We’ll also look at the various types of heads available and how each can be used for very specific shooting needs.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jun 01, 2009 0 comments

Tripods have been around for so many years that you can find some on sale for less than the cost of a medium pizza. All have three adjustable legs, a screw that attaches to the bottom of a camera, and some sort of mechanism that allows the user to point the lens steadily in the right direction without moving the whole contraption. That being said, is it smart to save a few bucks when shopping for...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Mar 19, 2013 Published: Feb 01, 2013 2 comments
It’s a truism that the best tripod is the one you carry with you, because it’s the only one you can use. But equally, it has to be the right tripod: the one that holds the equipment you use at the height you want and that locks it firmly, without “creep.” It also needs to be quick and easy to use, and durable. With that in mind here are some of the many tripods at photokina that caught my eye.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2009 0 comments

Perhaps the most exciting news in tripods is the first four-legged support. Yes, you read that correctly. In theory, it’s a more stable approach—just think of the pyramids. Aside from this innovation, there is a growing trend toward lighter-weight metals in tripods big and small—and that is certainly welcome. While carbon fiber, as a lightweight material, still has the advantage...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Dec 12, 2011 Published: Nov 01, 2011 0 comments
When I say filter, your first thought may be a Photoshop plug-in. That’s natural, especially if your first good camera was digital. But folks who cut their photographic teeth shooting 35mm film know all about the light-bending qualities of glass screw-in filters. Physical filters were once the best (and sometimes only) way to get certain types of creative shots. Although still as effective as ever, they’ve fallen from favor for several reasons.
George Schaub Posted: Dec 24, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments
The Vanguard ABEO Pro Kit starts out as a solid carbon-fiber tripod but then adds features and functions like a removable and rotatable (vertical or horizontal) center column, a pistol grip with built-in trigger release with cable attachments for many cameras, bubble levels, 80-degree leg spread, three “feet” supports (pads, spikes, and rubber), a quick-release base plate and mechanism, and etched degree settings on the center column for those who want to do precise panoramas.
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Peter K. Burian Posted: Dec 01, 1999 0 comments

As the manufacturer of numerous tripods, the Velbon name has been well known in the US for many years, particularly for very affordable and ultralight models. Recently however, some important changes have occurred. The Velbon Tripod Co. of Japan expanded...

George Schaub Posted: Jul 18, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 12 comments
Wacom recently introduced their new line of Bamboo tablets, and we thought we’d revisit the use of stylus and tablet tools to give it a try. For our test we worked with the Bamboo Capture, described by the company as most apt for enthusiast digital photographers, although there are three intros in this new line.

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