Accessories

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2009 1 comments

Every photokina, we are assigned a category that for want of a better term we call “weird and wonderful.” It’s stuff that doesn’t easily fit into any other category, or differs so much from the mass of its competitors that it deserves special mention.

Some products are just bizarre: we’ll come to what we thought was the most bizarre trend at the end...

George Schaub Posted: Mar 22, 2005 Published: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

If you enjoy exploring the fascinating world of close-up photography you should consider a ring flash as an essential part of your creative kit. A ring flash mounts around your taking lens and eliminates problems associated with standard shoe-mount flash and even off-camera flash, mainly the inability to down-angle the...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Oct 01, 2004 0 comments

Photos © 2004 Peter K. Burian, All Rights Reserved

Although we cover new equipment announced at trade shows, binoculars are often overlooked because they're not used for photography. Still, most outdoor shooters do carry binoculars and they can be invaluable for scanning or scouting an area and for searching out...

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Aug 14, 2014 0 comments

Spider Camera Holster recently introduced two new additions to their popular line of products: the SpiderPro Medium Lens Pouch and the Memory Card Organizer.

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C.A. Boylan Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

Adorama's Reporter And Daypack Backpacks
Adorama has announced two new cases created to meet the needs of both advanced amateurs and pros. Designed with the cooperation of Shutterbug's Joe Farace and his wife and fellow photographer Mary, these rugged packs are made from weather- and abrasion-resistant ballistic nylon and feature padded compartments...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

Look around any photographer's studio and you'll see all manner of tools aside from camera, darkroom or computer imaging station, and the requisite coffeepot. Studios can occupy entire floors of a loft building or a small room in the back of a storefront, but regardless of size it's a place where creativity and tools mesh. While different types of tools are...

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Ron Eggers Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

There are various companies that offer studio kits in a box (or canvas bag). For the most part, such portable studio systems are primarily lighting setups. They might include the heads, self-contained power packs, stands, and some type of diffuser. That's enough to get started with studio work, especially for experienced shooters. But photographers just starting to work with...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Apr 01, 2006 6 comments

Untitled Document
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Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 29, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 9 comments
There’s a new trend in camera carriers that appeals to photographers who want to look chic while still maintaining the core functionality of the bag. In terms of style they are at polar opposites to rugged backpacks or gear-laden roller bags, yet even the most stylish camera bag has to carry gear in a practical and organized fashion. That includes being built to withstand the rigors of being jostled or bumped in crowds, and being constructed to protect against spilled drinks, or rain at the very least. At the same time, the ideal bag should be built to carry everything we may need on a shoot, and then some.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 16, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 0 comments
My impression of a tabletop tripod was probably like yours—a squat, three-legged support that collapsed down to handily fit inside a camera bag. After unpacking the 17 camera supports that arrived, I had to modify my definition of the genre to include designs that mushroom to roughly 2 feet when fully open—and some with considerable girth and heft. That also meant extending my thinking to models with a center column and multiple leg sections, which might be more correctly termed “mini” tripods. Either way, in contrast to a standard tripod at its full height, the tripods under discussion, when fully open, have a small footprint and should effortlessly fit in tight spaces.
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Susan Park Posted: Oct 19, 2012 Published: Sep 01, 2012 13 comments
With the profusion of new cards with various and often confusing classifications and ratings we thought it a good idea to get guidance on selecting the right card for your camera and way of working from an expert. We recently met with the folks from SanDisk and they were kind enough to offer the following synopsis of card and camera, ratings and usage.—Editor
Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 1999 0 comments

Although we tend to take them for granted, batteries are an integral part of photography. Virtually every camera developed in the last 10 years becomes merely a paperweight without voltage to keep its mechanisms ticking. Unlike the previous generation which required power for little more than...

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Eric Bone Posted: Feb 01, 2010 1 comments

This short guide is intended to describe common card performance measurements and explain how these metrics give you the ability to make the most of your D-SLR.

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Jay Abend Posted: Oct 01, 1999 0 comments

For those of you who think that digital cameras cannot replace conventional medium and large format film, get a load of the Better Light 6000 scanning camera back. This rather expensive pro digital tool not only replaces 4x5 transparency film for most...

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Jay Miller Posted: Jan 20, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 3 comments
Like most of you, I’ve been frustrated by the amount of dust that accumulates not only on my sensors but also on my cameras and lenses in general. It’s an ongoing battle. Take photos, clean cameras; take photos, clean cameras.

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