Accessories

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2007 0 comments

When Shutterbug reporters are covering photokina, we understandably concentrate on what's new, and we each have our own assigned ranges of subjects. As a result, even after allowing for my "Weird Stuff" category, a number of really useful items and trends can either fall into the gaps between our coverage--"I thought you would be covering...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2007 1 comments

It was a heady affair covering camera supports at photokina, with dozens of new tripod tops from a variety of manufacturers. The trend is toward greater precision and quality: increased control, with spring counterweights to balance heavy lenses, calibrated friction control as pioneered by Novoflex, panoramic calibrations, and quick-release plates. Some manufacturers...

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Jan 01, 2007 0 comments

The time-honored Shutterbug Weird Stuff category is for all the products that don't fit in anywhere else: the sort of thing where a friend who was at the show tells you, "You wouldn't believe what I saw..." As well as the glorious examples in the subhead, we can add online caricatures, limpet-mine camera supports, Internet telephones, dental...

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Dave Howard Posted: Sep 01, 2000 0 comments

PhotoPlus Expo West 2000, held this past June in Los Angeles, suffered, as it does every even-numbered year, from occurring not long after PMA in February, and not long before photokina in September. This means few new introductions, mostly just...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

Remember the old Kodak 18 percent Gray Card that we used as a neutral target to determine exposure, without undue influence from bright and dark tones? I still have a bunch of those lying around. There were several problems with the card; holding it the wrong way might cause a glaring hot spot. Second, it was cardboard, not built to last. Third, it didn't travel...

Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 27, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 0 comments
The Phottix Odin is a radio frequency-controlled system, or simply radio remote. The basic package includes two units: a transmitter and a receiver. Additional receivers are optional. You only need one transmitter to sit in the camera’s hot shoe and trigger compatible i-TTL strobes, but you need a receiver for each off-camera flash. And recently, Phottix introduced a new combo pack that includes one additional receiver—perfect for my two-speedlight setups. The unit tested here is for Nikon and I worked with my Nikon SB-900 speedlights.
Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 20, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 4 comments
Slik introduced the first pistol grip over 25 years ago, heralding an innovative adaptation of the ball socket head. Still in production, that head has not changed, but today there are numerous variations on this basic design. Several are fashioned along the lines of a video game joystick. Two other types included here are the collar lock ball head and what I call the “vice grip” head.
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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

In order to organize and conveniently display your favorite pictures of family, friends, pets, and travel, you need albums. There were many sizes and shapes on display with a host of color variations, textures, and themes. For those precious few images worthy of even more prominent display, there were lots of frames for single or multiple images.

There were also...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

Nearly every picture-taking device today is electronic in operation so the need for a reliable battery is imperative. Some digital cameras use specialized rechargeable batteries while compact models often still rely on standard AA- or AAA-size batteries. The latter tend to hog the battery power, especially when flash pictures are made. Because of this there were lots of battery...

Shutterbug Staff Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

As part of our annual Photo Marketing Association (PMA) coverage we ask our reporters to deliver a "Best of Show" award. While each contributor had their own beat, we also asked them to go beyond their respective area of coverage to find what, for them, signified a breakthrough product, technology, or new trend that they felt would affect all photographers in the...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

While camera bags often aim for functionality over style, there were several shoulder bags shown this year that had fashion chic paramount in their design, and a number of them aimed at the female photo enthusiast. Still, the photo backpack seemed to dominate when it came to functionality and innovative design, including two combo packs targeting the hard-core backpacker or...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

This report covers back-up systems and all sorts of storage devices, beginning with USB flash (thumb/pen) and handheld devices. In terms of backup, there was only one hardware solution worthy of note, plus a related product that uses DVDs. Beyond that, there are the plethora of digital photo frames, making it one of the hottest product categories at this year's show.
...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

While some sounded the death knell of filters when digital imaging arrived, with all the in camera and plug-in manipulations available, there were a number of new and often high-end filters on display. Here's what's new and improved in this frequently essential accessory:

Argraph announced a new Marumi DHG (Digital High Grade) Achromat Macro 200 (+5)...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

Big, brash, and more digitized than ever before, this year's show exhibited scads of interesting photographic items intended to whet the photographic appetite of any type of photographer. This report covers memorable items that don't fit into any specific category but were worthy of mention.

Camera Armor Extreme (Made Products) is a...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

As digital camera resolution is increasing, memory card manufacturers are keeping up, releasing new products with greater speed and storage capacity. Whether you shoot raw or the finest JPEGs, there's definitely a benefit to using the fastest memory card. The extra speed is useful primarily for greater burst depth--more frames in a long series--but also for shorter...

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