Accessories

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Posted: May 01, 2007 Published: Apr 03, 2007 0 comments

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Ron Eggers Posted: Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

Photographers are going to like JTL's new multifunctional meter, the LM-8. It's a compact unit that can take ambient light measurements, flash light measurements, and cine measurements, for moviemakers. With its built-in memory, it's possible to take multiple and cumulative measurements. It's a little smaller than most multifunctional units, making it easy...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

The digital camera in your hands provides you with loads of technology. It allows you to bracket automatically in a series of three or even five exposures, depending on model and user settings. But given the limited space on a memory card (notably when shooting raw at high pixel counts), the time spent to shoot all those frames, the limited buffer memory that you might fill up in...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

You might think that the sophisticated metering system in your camera is the be all and end all when it comes to exposure. The truth is, it does deliver remarkable results, but it can only take you so far. Want to tackle high-contrast scenes or tricky lighting or tonal situations without wasting a lot of time bracketing? Then you'll need a handheld meter. Shooting studio...

Cynthia Boylan Posted: Jul 28, 2014 0 comments

LEDGO has introduced a new line of professional LED light panels (models LG-600S, LG-600CS, LG-1200S and LG-1200CS) that feature a >95 CRI rating, an all metal housing and removable metal barn doors—in single and bi-color models—and Sony V-Lock battery adapter plates. Prices range from $439 to $799.

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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

At PMA 2004 I handled a prototype of Leica's DIGITAL-MODUL-R and was immediately impressed by the concept of being able to convert a film camera into digital by merely switching backs. At PhotoPlus Expo later that year I had the chance to see a preproduction model and hoped that someday this wonderful product would see the light of day. Recently, I've been shooting...

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 15, 2012 Published: May 01, 2012 0 comments
There are three main elements in depth of field—focal length, aperture, and distance to subject—and depth of field is a very important part of a 2D photograph. It’s how we judge scale (or are fooled by it), how we note the importance of certain subjects within the frame, and how we define content and context in the scene. With these three controls, and using various points of view, it seems we have infinite variations to choose from, and that’s part of the creative play of photography. Now you can add a fourth element to the mix—tilts that range from mild to extreme and that create “slices” of sharpness within the frame. The tool that helps us create that effect is the latest optic from Lensbaby, which they dub the Edge 80.
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George Schaub Posted: Sep 15, 2011 Published: Aug 01, 2011 1 comments
Having shot with numerous Lensbaby products over the past years I’ve almost grown accustomed to their ingenious approach to image-making tools and the equally ingenious way in which they approach product design. I do have to admit that one area in which I took less advantage than I might have was in aperture control and how that affected depth of field in my Lensbaby shots, more from laziness or simply forgetting about changing the aperture inserts as I got involved in the shoot. (For those who have not shot with Lensbaby optics you lift in and drop out, via supplied magnetic wand, the various aperture rings corresponding to the diameter of the desired aperture for the optic in use.) Now, this impediment to getting the most from the optics (admittedly, again, my own) is removed with their latest product, the Sweet 35 Optic.
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Peter K. Burian Posted: Aug 01, 2001 0 comments

The most popular type of camera bag among serious outdoor photographers, the photo backpack, has two major advantages. Models with a sophisticated harness system offer the most comfortable method for carrying a lot of weight. Because...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2006 0 comments

On a recent trip to Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, I had a choice of several of Lowepro's photo backpacks. I would load one up, try it on, and do the same with each in turn. Even though I received the DryZone Rover for the express purpose of testing it, I wasn't about to sacrifice my trip and take a bag ill-suited to the task. Among the bags at my disposal were the...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Combining backpack carrying qualities and roomy storage with sling-like bag accessibility to gear, the Lowepro Fastpack 250 ($119 MSRP) adds the modern necessity of a safe and padded laptop storage area as well. Lightweight yet sturdy, the bag has ample shoulder straps and side pockets, plus a back support belt and strap for added security and comfort. Divided into two...

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Jason Schneider Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

Ever since Foveon, Inc., based in Santa Clara, California, announced their unique new image sensor design back in 2001, it has been the subject of some controversy. Foveon's initial promotional campaign proclaimed the virtues of their invention in glowing terms while denigrating the competition, with the predictable result being a background level of skepticism that persists...

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Aug 13, 2014 0 comments

Manfrotto’s been on a roll lately with new camera bag releases.

Cynthia Boylan Posted: Aug 12, 2014 0 comments

Manfrotto has just unveiled a new photo backpack line called Pro Light. Designed to be versatile, functional and ergonomic, Manfrotto’s Pro Light line offers a variety of sizes and styles of bags to fit photographers’ needs.

Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 01, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 3 comments
The most recent speed gains have been in SD format cards, making us wonder about the larger CF card. But that concern has been to an extent dispelled by some of the recent developments in this very fast-changing field. One of the newest developments unveiled at the show was a card that sits between those two sizes, the XQD card. The first camera to accept the new memory card is the Nikon D4, although the D4 also features a CF slot.

XQD has a smaller form factor than CF, so they’re not interchangeable. Sony, the company that introduced the world’s first XQD card, notes that you can record up to 100 Raw image frames from continuous shooting mode using the card and obtain 125MB/sec read/write speed when using a PCIe port; new XQD card readers are available as well. The casing around the card is “robust,” with contact pins inside the casing itself, which Nikon says helps eliminate problems in the field.

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