Accessories

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Jay Miller Posted: Feb 10, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 1 comments
I’ve been a dedicated gimbal head user for a long time. If you shoot with seriously long lenses, no other head comes close to offering a gimbal’s stability, articulation, and flexibility. Forget ball heads and anything else designed to attach long telephotos to a tripod. If you’re a big lens user and you photograph things that move, a gimbal is the only way to go.
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Dave Howard Posted: Jul 01, 2000 0 comments

What meets the casual eye regarding monopods is one tripod leg with a 1/4 "-20 screw at the top. However, those who are familiar with the monopod's unique benefits, and are properly versed in its technique, know that its beauty is more than...

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 15, 2011 Published: May 01, 2011 0 comments
Remote viewing and shutter release capability opens up a host of picture opportunities, from working high atop camera platforms from ground level to very low-level shooting without muddying your clothes (given your camera lacks an articulating monitor) to placing your camera in spots and being able to view and shoot without your being right behind the viewfinder. Many photographers routinely work with radio triggers for flash, especially in studio environments where the lights are set in position and photographer and model or subject move. The Hähnel Inspire adds to the mix with remote shutter release and viewing in one.
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Ron Eggers and Stan Sholik Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

Newer digital cameras have become so good at taking light measurements that some photographers might question the need for handheld meters. It may seem that the sophisticated multi-segment metering systems, the advanced light measurement capabilities, and the ways these cameras are able to work with different light sources with different color temperatures are making handheld...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jan 01, 2001 0 comments

There seems to be a proliferation of belt clip systems for carrying small film or digital cameras, camcorders, cell phones, and similar items that are needed nearby when you are busy doing something else. One of the latest to come to our...

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Oct 29, 2014 0 comments

Heavy Leather NYC recently added a selection of new styles to their line of high-end, hand crafted camera straps. These new styles represent a collaboration between Heavy Leather NYC and Sophie C’est La Vie, a well-known Brooklyn-based tattoo artist who co-designed the limited edition series of printed camera strap using her signature origami themed art. These straps offer a fresh take on the usual classic camera strap because of Sophie’s rock ‘n’ roll flair.

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Oct 20, 2014 0 comments

Created for adventurous types, like those who live to explore the night on a bicycle, skateboard, surfboard (or with SCUBA gear), the Qudos (pronounced kudos) Action light for GoPro cameras helps illuminate the darkness and allows you to capture great videos of your nocturnal adventures. The Qudos Action is a high-powered video light designed specifically for use with Go-Pro 2, Hero3 and Hero3+ cameras, as well as other action cameras that are compatible with GoPro conversion mounts.

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Nov 01, 2001 0 comments

Gifts Under $100
One of the most useful and helpful gifts for any photographer--with any type of camera--who wants better flash pictures is a small slave flash that "reads" a camera's built-in flash and automatically synchronizes and fires to provide additional lighting. These...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2001 0 comments

If there's a photo enthusiast on your holiday gift list, there's a vast range of products that would make for highly suitable gifts. Whether your budget is tight or unlimited, the following accessories should bring a smile of appreciation and many years of productive use. With that...

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Jay Abend Posted: Jun 01, 1999 5 comments

Of all the articles that I have written for Shutterbug, there is one topic that continually generates mail from readers. Whenever I have mentioned my "homemade battery packs" for Vivitar 283 and 285 flash units, the mail pours in. Sick of poky...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

When I shot film, I carried a number of glass filters in my camera bag to every destination. And since I was shooting slide film, I needed the effect then and there—I didn’t depend on post-processing. Now that I’m shooting digital, one would think that I no longer needed glass filters. Well, that’s a misguided notion. There is always at least one filter in my camera bag: a...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Jun 24, 2011 Published: May 01, 2011 1 comments
“Can you use a tripod and IS at the same time?”

Almost 20 years after the dramatic success of the first autofocus 35mm SLR, the Minolta Maxxum 7000, Minolta introduced “body integral” Image Stabilization (IS) to the world in the DiMAGE A1, and the game changed. Advanced photographers recognized the value of stabilization. That was back in 2003, but it wasn’t the first attempt to quell camera jitters. Previously, IS had been performed optically. Minolta did it in the camera body by physically moving the sensor to counteract camera movement. We called it Anti-Shake, and I was a member of the team that brought it to market.

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Joe Farace Posted: Sep 01, 2007 0 comments

Imaged dirt is always with us. Most times you don't even notice it on a photograph because of the exposure or the subject matter, but when shooting at small apertures or up against smooth backgrounds such as seamless paper or the sky, it's right there in your face. If you've tried to scan film you already know that even the tiniest dust speck becomes a boulder...

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Staff Posted: May 08, 2012 Published: Apr 01, 2012 1 comments
Traveling by plane these days is certainly no joy, a bad situation made worse for photographers who never check their precious gear. Traveling on regional jets, and especially international flights, means not being able to lug large backpacks or roller cases filled with gear on board. And with flights so jammed airlines have gotten even stricter about carry-ons, despite the fact that their policies now make everyone want to carry on rather than shell out the extra bucks. It’s getting pretty nasty out there.
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George Schaub Posted: Jul 01, 2010 1 comments

The question always becomes: how much gear can I get away with when I carry my camera and laptop on-board an aircraft? The answer depends upon the carryon rules, the size of the overhead compartment or under-seat space, and, I’m afraid, sometimes on the whims of the gate agent. The best way to make sure there are no hassles and no suspense on your part—flying is stressful...

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