Pro-Quality Digital SLRs

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 01, 2004 0 comments

Photographing race cars is a challenge no matter what kind of camera you use. Most people think that all they need is high ISO, fast shutter speed, and a long lens with a large aperture a.k.a. "big glass." Toss in a high frame per second continuous shooting mode and with a little...

Jay Abend Posted: Mar 01, 2003 0 comments

The Canon EOS-1Ds

This digital thing just might work out after all. Consumer point-and-shoot cameras are getting better, faster, cheaper, and easier to use. Photo quality color printers are starting to live up to their "lab...

Jason Schneider Posted: May 01, 2010 1 comments

The first digital Leica M with a full-frame, 24x36mm sensor (active area 23.9x35.8mm), the M9 offers 18-megapixel capture and unrestricted coverage with nearly the entire range of Leica lenses past and present, including extreme wide angles.

Perhaps even more important, the M9’s exclusive 18-megapixel CCD, developed by Kodak with input from Leica, has addressed the foibles that...

Uwe Steinmueller Posted: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments

The Nikon D2H has replaced the Nikon D1H; it has also been targeted against the competition camera Canon EOS-1D. The Nikon D2H is capable of 8 fps which matches the Canon EOS-1D in terms of frames per second. There is no other camera in this league on the...

Tony Sweet Posted: Aug 01, 2005 0 comments

When Nikon announced the D2X last year at photokina there was a good deal of anticipation about it, and a good wait that followed until it finally arrived. In the meantime, Canon countered with their EOS-1Ds Mark II, which in many ways shaped the competitive landscape. With a street price of $4999.95, Nikon's flagship digital SLR is $3000 less than the $8000 (body only) Mark...

Steve Sint Posted: Feb 07, 2013 Published: Jan 01, 2013 1 comments
The Nikon D4 is a large sized, 16MP, lightning fast D-SLR, with high-definition video capability good enough to satisfy an independent film producer. At first, my thought was to see how the D4 worked when used for the more mundane subjects I shoot than what it was designed for, and to see how it compared to the APS-C sized cameras I prefer. But, by the time my experience with the camera ended, I had shot a tutorial video with it (www.setshoptutorials.com and then click on “Anatomy of a Still Life”), found its fast framing rate more helpful than I expected, and decided I especially liked Nikon’s D4, an FX camera, when shot in the DX (APS-C) mode. Although the primary difference between the D4 and the D3 is the D4’s increased resolution and its advanced video capability, I found the whole package that represents the D4’s feature set just as important, so let’s look at those.
George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

One of the glories of digital cameras is that you have as many options as you could desire in terms of exposure, white balance, file format and compression, sharpness, contrast, color saturation, bracketing, flash modes, and ISO settings, etc., all in each frame. This allows you to bring all your photo...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

The new "flagship" of the Olympus E-System, the E-3 replaces the 5-megapixel E-1 introduced in 2003. This 10-megapixel model shares no components with its predecessor but a quick glance through the specifications may suggest that it's similar to the EVOLT E-510. In truth, the E-3 is more advanced in virtually every respect, boasting superior technology, an...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

Billed as the "world's smallest digital SLR," this Olympus model is an upgraded version of the E-410 with several benefits. These include a slightly larger (2.7") LCD screen with better display quality, more versatile autofocus in Live View, plus support for wireless off-camera TTL flash. Image quality has also been improved slightly with a tweaked sensor...

Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 2011 10 comments

When it was launched in October 2007, the E-3 broke new ground. It wasn’t a me-too SLR; it carried the Four Thirds format into new directions that were uniquely Olympus.

Joe Farace Posted: Nov 11, 2011 Published: Oct 01, 2011 7 comments
Pentax has a long history of innovation as well as a rabid fan base that loves the company’s tradition of optical excellence and originality. In fact, this fan base is the reason I’m writing this review. If you’re not already a Pentaxian you probably didn’t know that Pentax (derived from PENTAprism refleX) built the first camera to incorporate a penta-prism viewfinder and reflex mirror system in 1957 and went on to introduce the first TTL metering system in 1964. While late to the digital SLR game, when they finally arrived it was with a series of entry-level cameras that delivered impressive image quality at affordable prices. Over time they’ve dipped their toes into the semipro market and the K-5 is the latest model with professional aspirations yet it retains all the quirky uniqueness that all Pentax cameras have and that endears them to so many photographers.
Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

Lots of people don't know that Pentax built the first Japanese-made Single Lens Reflex (SLR) camera. In 1952 the Asahi Optical Company of Japan created the Pentax (PENTAprism refleX) line of cameras and were the first to incorporate a penta-prism viewfinder and reflex mirror system into a camera they called the Asahiflex I. This camera featured a cloth curtain focal plane...

Joe Farace Posted: Aug 01, 2007 0 comments

The Pentax K100D is an awesome camera for the price and works with all the 24 million Pentax lenses made since 1964. Now Pentax Imaging is "kicking it up a notch" with the K10D, a more serious, even professional, D-SLR as evidenced by its stainless-steel chassis. The camera is weather-resistant with 72 seals, including shutter release and all switches, levers, and...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

Until recently, 10 megapixels was the norm among the enthusiast-level D-SLRs but that changed with the introduction of Nikon’s 12-megapixel D300. Pentax was the first to move to even higher resolution with their 14.6-megapixel model, the K20D, followed by Sony with their 14.2-megapixel Alpha A350. Aside from a 4.6 million increase in effective pixels, the Pentax K20D boasts some other...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

The 10-megapixel Pentax K10D was a very popular camera thanks to its rugged, splashproof construction, built-in Image Stabilizer, some unique features, and excellent image quality.

The new K20D is even more desirable. Featuring the highest resolution in its class, this 14.6-megapixel D-SLR is now the flagship of the Pentax line. Although it retains the best features...

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