Amateur Digital SLRs

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David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 2001 0 comments

First, I must express my gratitude to Olympus. A few years ago when rumors of digital backs for 35mm SLRs first cropped up, I responded in print with the opinion that eventually cameras designed for and around a CCD chip would prevail.

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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 14, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 10 comments
The half-frame 35mm Olympus Pen F was introduced in 1963 and featured none other than the late W. Eugene Smith, cigarette dangling from his lips, in magazine ads of the time. Its latest digital incarnation, the E-P3, is built using the Micro Four Thirds system that unlike the Pen F is not half-frame and uses the same chip size (17.3x13mm) as the standard Four Thirds system. Like the original Pen F, it’s an extremely sophisticated camera wrapped in a compact, interchangeable lens body that delivers SLR performance and lots more. The E-P3 is the flagship of the Olympus Micro Four Thirds system and part of a family of compact cameras that includes the E-PL3, E-PM1 a.k.a. Mini, new lenses, and a clever little wireless speedlight.
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Peter K. Burian Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Peter K. Burian, All Rights Reserved

Shortly after the professional Olympus E-1 was introduced in 2003, the company made a commitment to design a more affordable model as well. And Olympus delivered with the E-300 EVOLT for photo enthusiasts who don't want to spend over $1000 on their digital SLR. This camera employs a similar "Four...

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 01, 2004 0 comments

During Olympus' sneak preview for their E-1 at photokina 2002 emphasis was placed on the digital SLR's Four Thirds imaging system. At the high-fashion product roll out in New York's Bryant Park, so much importance was made of the company's medical imaging accomplishments I expected the ghost of Albert Schweitzer to start playing the organ in the background.

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Joe Farace Posted: Jan 01, 2010 1 comments

The original Olympus Pen was introduced in 1959 and was the first Japanese half-frame 35mm camera produced. Its name? Designer Maitani’s concept was that the camera would be as convenient to carry as a pen.

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

The Olympus EVOLT E-330 is the first interchangeable lens digital SLR with a true, full-time Live View feature. Framing a shot with the E-330 is just as convenient as it is with a compact digital camera. You can preview the subject in full color on a flip-out, variable-angle LCD monitor, another first for a digital SLR camera.

In fact, there are two distinct Live View...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

Pros
· High resolution, pleasing color rendition, snappy contrast, superb image quality at ISO 100-400
· Supersonic Wave filter is highly effective in removing dust from CCD sensor
· Overall speed should satisfy most photo enthusiasts
· Vast range of features to satisfy both novices and experienced digital...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2007 1 comments

The first Four Thirds format D-SLR with a built-in Image Stabilizer, the EVOLT E-510 is an incredibly versatile camera in many respects. This 10-megapixel model offers several benefits over the previous EVOLT models, including higher resolution, the faster TruePic III processor with superior noise reduction, plus additional features in Capture and Playback modes. But the new...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2004 0 comments

A few years ago, when most of us were shooting with 35mm cameras, a 400mm lens was considered to be a super telephoto, intended primarily for professional sports photography or for wildlife work. Today, an increasing number of digital cameras incorporate...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 01, 2010 1 comments

Micro Four Thirds format cameras promise of compact size, reduced weight, and versatility approaching a D-SLR. I recently had the opportunity to work with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 to see how it fulfilled those ambitions.

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jan 01, 2010 1 comments

Panasonic is one of the primary supporters of the Four Thirds format system that utilizes a standard sensor and lens mount that allow you to use lenses from other companies supporting the format, including Olympus and Sigma.

Peter K. Burian Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

The first Panasonic D-SLR, the Lumix DMC-L1 is a product of an alliance with Olympus, since it employs, according to the company, some "jointly developed technologies and components." In fact, this camera shares many attributes with the Olympus EVOLT E-330, including the lens mount, Supersonic Wave sensor dust removal system, and Panasonic's Four Thirds format...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2010 3 comments

The promise of Micro Four Thirds system cameras is that you get the light weight and portability of a smallish point-and-shoot camera with the lens interchangeability and functions of an advanced D-SLR.

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2004 1 comments

As one of the last of the major manufacturers to release a digital SLR camera, Pentax entered the market late in the game. By October 2003 (when the Pentax *ist D began shipping) numerous other models were available, including some "new and improved" third generation cameras.

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Jul 24, 2014 0 comments

Pentax has unveiled a new limited edition "Prestige" version of its K-3 digital SLR with a distinctive gunmetal chassis. According to Pentax, the K-3 is a special edition camera created to commemorate “the many awards bestowed upon the K-3” by photography publications and websites.

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