Scanners & Printers

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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

Technical Specifications
Scanner Type: Flat-bed color with TMA for scanning all standard film formats
Photo & Film Restoration: Digital ICE (built-in) to restore damaged photos and film
Color Restoration: ColoRescue for photos and film
Bit Depth: True 48-bit color
...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Apr 01, 2002 0 comments

Most photographers want to use the best tools available and hope they can afford the best. When it comes to film scanners, Minolta's latest DiMAGE Scan Multi PRO sets the standard for a reasonably affordable scanner. This new Minolta scanner...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 2011 57 comments

A new CanoScan flat-bed photo scanner, the 9000F, has an exceptionally high 9600x9600 optical resolution. It’s priced right, with a list of $249, but how well does it work and what quality of scans does it reproduce from 35mm film?

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David B. Brooks Posted: Dec 01, 1999 0 comments

Canon's announcement of their new CanoScan FS 2710 35mm and APS film scanner covers every edge of a very broad target of potential users.

CanoScan FS 2710 Features. The physical specifications in all parameters for...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Sep 01, 1999 0 comments

A complete, ideal digital darkroom includes three basic elements: input from a scanner or digital camera, a personal computer with image-editing software, and output in the form of a photo-realistic printer. From my perspective the output is "the...

Shutterbug Staff Posted: Jul 01, 2007 0 comments

As part of our coverage each of our reporters were asked to pick out what they considered the Best of Show product, service, or idea. In most cases it is the item that caused them to reconsider how they worked or that sparked their imagination. While each reporter had their beat, this category was open game for all, and most "crossed lines" to find their pick.
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Joe Farace Posted: Jul 01, 2007 0 comments

It used to be that manufacturers and even us press types hailed every tiny improvement in printer technology as a major achievement. Now the honeymoon is over. We expect these devices to produce impressive color and monochrome output and do so at an inexpensive price--except for the inks, of course. As a result, photo-quality printers, except for pricy laser and dye...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2007 0 comments

With so much digital in evidence, you'd think scanning would be a hot area at PMA. At least, I was hoping it would be. There's a big gap in the middle when it comes to ways to get your film into the digital realm. You've got the low end, typically a normal flat-bed scanner that's optimized for reflective scans and does a mediocre job of scanning...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 1999 0 comments

Nikon has been at the forefront of 35mm film scanning from the beginning, and has enjoyed a top position in the field most recently with the CoolScan LS-1000. Just a short time ago Nikon announced a new CoolScan that would be better and easier to use, but...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: May 01, 2004 0 comments

Until recently, a 4000dpi Nikon 35mm film scanner would have set you back at least $1000, but that has changed with the introduction of the Coolscan V ED. Even at $599 this model is absolutely loaded with advanced features such as an ED (extra low dispersion glass) lens for superb image quality...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2005 0 comments

This one is for everyone who is making the transition from film to digital and has file drawers filled with 35mm slides. It's also for teachers, clubs, and institutions who might want to convert 35mm slides to digital files for lectures, presentations, and archiving. Indeed, the Pacific Image Electronics PowerSlide 3600 is one of the most practical and easy-to-use tools that...

Joe Farace Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Times change. Last year, dye sublimation snapshot printers were all the rage. This year the focus on printers at PMA was on permanence with more and more printers available with archival image-printing capabilities. Many included the availability of multiple cartridges capable of using pigment-based inks for creating long-lasting, gallery-quality output. The upside is, of...

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2001 0 comments

Affordable photo-realistic output was the holy grail of color printers, and Epson's 1994 introduction of the Stylus Color ink jet printer changed the ball game forever. The original Stylus Color was a 720 dots per inch (more on...

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2007 0 comments

While HP did show a number of consumer-oriented printers, perhaps the most interest was generated by their new HP Designjet Z2100 and Z3100 models. Both use HP Vivera pigment ink technology (introduced with the HP Photosmart Pro B9180) and have built-in color management with an embedded spectrophotometer. According to HP, the use of the Vivera pigmented inks yields 200+ years...

George Schaub Posted: Nov 08, 2013 Published: Oct 01, 2013 1 comments
Designed for professionals, enthusiasts, schools, and clubs, the OpticFilm 120 scanner from Plustek ($1999) can handle negative and positive film, including 35mm filmstrips, individual 35mm slides, and medium format film up to 6x12cm format. The scanner contains an eight-element glass lens and can deliver up to 10,600dpi optical resolution, with a claimed 4.01 dynamic range using the supplied SilverFast software’s Multi-Exposure function. The tabletop scanner is about the size of a six-slice restaurant toaster (about 8x14.5x7.5”) and is supplied with a complete set of very well-constructed film holders, an IT8 calibration target, and a full version (not a trial) of SilverFast Ai Studio 8 software.

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