Lenses

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Aug 01, 2002 0 comments

Ask any group of professional sports or wildlife photographers to name their favorite lens, and most will mention a "fast" 500mm f/4 model with internal focusing and low dispersion glass elements. Ideal in many respects, such lenses offer several advantages.

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2001 0 comments

Although 50-105mm focal length macro lenses are by far the most popular, many advanced nature photographers prefer longer lenses. Consequently, many camera manufacturers make a premium grade 180mm or 200mm macro lens. Now Sigma offers one, too...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 24, 2008 Published: Jul 30, 2008 0 comments

The Sigma APO 150-50mm lens is a moderately fast, super-telephoto zoom designed to work with both APS-C and full-frame DSLR cameras. It offers quite useful close focusing (7.2 ft) and two modes of what they deem "optical stabilization" (OS.) Weighing in at 67.4 oz you always know its there, but then again this is one impressive piece of...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Apr 01, 2002 0 comments

The Sigma engineers never seem to take a break, coming up with new lenses with surprising frequency. Late last year, they released two short zooms that certainly attracted a lot of attention. Their AF 15-30mm f/3.5-4.5 EX DG Aspherical boasts the...

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Jay Abend Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Long, fast, good lenses are expensive. They're also worth it. Whether you shoot sports, live performances, wildlife, people, or just need to reach out into the distance for that perfect shot, a really good telephoto lens is a must.

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2004 0 comments

All Photos © 2004 Peter K. Burian, All Rights Reserved

Until recently, only Canon and Nikon offered interchangeable lenses with a camera shake compensating system called Image Stabilizer (IS) and Vibration Reduction (VR), respectively (see the discussion on IS and VR lens technology in our August 2004 issue, or on our website at: www.shutterbug.com).

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

Although Sigma released their first lens with a built-in Optical Stabilizer (OS) system in the spring of 2004, the company employed this technology in only one pro-grade lens, the 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6. That has changed with the introduction of a more compact/affordable (digital-only) 18-200mm OS zoom. Sigma will not comment about future plans, but a reliable source indicates that...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2009 0 comments

There is an underlying desire in every travel or street photographer to be able to carry one lens to cover all contingencies.

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2005 1 comments

Note the "EX DG" appellation in this new Sigma lens. This signifies a lens that you can use for both film and digital photography, as opposed to Sigma's "EX DC" branding, which can only be used with digital SLRs. The difference is in the image circle each projects. Use a "DC" lens on a film camera and you'll have serious...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Aug 01, 2007 0 comments

Because most consumers demand very compact, lightweight equipment, the majority of lenses are designed with a relatively small aperture: f/4 to f/5.6, for example. That makes sense because the same focal length with a wide aperture would be larger, heavier, and more expensive due to the oversized optical elements and barrel. Even so, many photo enthusiasts really appreciate an...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

I 've been shooting most of my portrait work with a 28-75mm zoom, but always felt I could use something longer. And I'm about at the point where fixed focal length lenses just won't do; once you get used to the flexibility of a zoom, you're spoiled. I also like a fast lens with a relatively wide maximum aperture, as I like to get way out-of-focus...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Jun 01, 2007 1 comments

Technical Specifications

Lens Construction: 18 Elements in 14 Groups
Angle of View: 27.9 ° - 9.5 °
Number of Diaphragm Blades: 9 Blades
Minimum Aperture: F22
Minimum Focusing Distance: 100cm / 39.4 inches
Maximum Magnification:...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2006 0 comments

One of the favorite lenses among news photographers, a 70-200mm f/2.8 or 80-200mm f/2.8 zoom also appeals to many serious photo enthusiasts. Although large and heavy, lenses of this type offer several benefits. Their very wide maximum aperture allows for faster shutter speeds than the more typical f/4.5-5.6 zooms, great for low-light or action photography at lower ISOs (film or...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Dec 01, 2006 0 comments

While searching for a new portrait lens I saw Sigma's APO MACRO 150mm f/2.8 on their website. But wait, you say, this is a macro lens, not a portrait lens! Here's my thinking: Any portrait photographer out there worth his light meter will gladly extol the virtues of a long, fast lens for portraiture. The reasons are simple--limited angle of view to get rid of...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

If you ever want a unique point of view try a "fisheye" lens. Like looking through a door peephole (which in fact is a "fisheye" type) this order of lens sacrifices linear correction in favor of a very wide angle of view. Originally made for creating "full sky" images when pointed straight up, they had long ago been adopted by photographers for...

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