Lenses

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2007 Published: Jul 01, 2007 0 comments

Although most of the new products shown at PMA 2007 were digital, at least some of the new lenses are just as useful for anyone still shooting with a 35mm SLR system. While some of the new zooms were designed exclusively for use with D-SLRs with the APS-size sensor, the multi-platform lenses work perfectly with both analog and digital cameras. That's because they project...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Aug 01, 1999 0 comments

Although most autofocus Nikkor lenses employ a focus motor in the camera body, Nikon was actually the first manufacturer to build a motor into the lens barrel. In 1983, they unveiled two such AF lenses--the 80mm f/2.8 and 200mm f/3.5ED, both for the F3AF.

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 18, 2012 Published: May 01, 2012 1 comments
Every year manufacturers and distributors unveil new products at trade show events. They see these shows as the best venues to garner the attention of the gathered members of their industries and to show them their latest wares. In the photo industry this has traditionally been the annual Photo Marketing Association (PMA) Show, which we have always covered. This year that event was subsumed into the larger Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas.
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Dan Havlik Posted: Sep 25, 2014 0 comments

Here’s a little more photo gear news we didn’t fully get to in our comprehensive photokina coverage last week. Third-party lens manufacturers Sigma and Tamron both made waves at the show by announcing intriguing new zoom lenses.

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Aug 01, 2000 0 comments

Although Tamron makes some exceptional professional lenses, one of its moderately priced products--various models of the 28-200mm zoom--has amassed sales of over one million lenses and won "Best Buy" awards worldwide. This is understandable, considering...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2000 0 comments

Dedicated to sophisticated design and engineering, Tokina makes lenses with an excellent reputation; the best of these bear the AT-X designation, denoting "Advanced Technology-Xtra." These models--bearing a gold stripe indicating premium grade optics--include...

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Aug 01, 2002 0 comments

Nikon's brief reintroduction of the rangefinder S3 in a "millennium commemorative" edition prompted the issue of three Voigtlander lenses in Nikon fit: the 21mm f/4, 25mm f/4, and 35mm f/2.5.

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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Jul 18, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments
Considering that this opticis only a tad slower than the Nikkor 200-400mm f/4, with a drop of a stop when you zoom out, has a 5x zoom range, is lighter, and costs about half of the near $7000 price tag of the 200-400mm f/4, it is certainly worthy of consideration for those who can appreciate what it has to offer in both range and versatility.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 22, 2011 Published: Oct 01, 2011 4 comments
The 85mm VR Micro Nikkor ($529.95, MSRP) benefits from next-generation VR II technology and is stated to deliver usable results at up to four steps below the optimum shutter speed. Keep in mind that we’re dealing with a DX-dedicated lens for an APS-C sensor camera (like my D300). So the optimum shutter speed when shooting handheld and without VR on translates into 1/(Lens Focal Length x Sensor Factor), or 1⁄85mm x 1.5, or 1⁄125 sec (rounded off). (Because this is a DX lens and this is Nikon, the multiplication factor is 1.5, so the effective focal length is approximately 128mm.)
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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Aug 01, 2004 0 comments

For Nikon, 1996 was an exciting year. That was the introduction date of the F5 camera that revolutionized the way handheld cameras would be used. It was also the year that true Silent Wave Technology was brought on-line in the form of the 300, 500, and...

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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Aug 01, 2001 0 comments

Picking up a Nikon 300mm f/2.8 for the first time was certainly a humbling experience. This lens was not only large in physical size, it was heavy! Specifications show that it checked in at around 51/2 lbs and measured almost a foot in...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2009 0 comments

We have seen new options from independent and camera maker manufacturers alike, each bringing the fun and creative options of these unique angles of view to ever more affordable price ranges.

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2010 0 comments

When you talk about lenses these days you always have to bring in the multiplication factor, especially when you have a lens that fits comfortably on both so-called full-frame and APS-C sensor cameras. To know what angles of view you will have available you have to know: (a) that the lens is made for full-sized sensors (or not) so will work with the multiplication factor on smaller sized sensors...

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Stan Trzoniec Posted: Aug 01, 2010 1 comments

Nikon’s entry into past universal 80-200mm f/2.8 lenses started back in 1978 with a manual focus, push-pull lens checking in at 4 lbs. Ten years later the autofocus model arrived sporting ED (Extra-low Dispersion) glass; ’92 marked the “D” package. In ’96 the AF-S version came along, followed by the new generation of front motor drive “G” models. Now we...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

When I first heard about a 35mm focal length macro lens my mouth began to water. The $229 price tag was an immediate inducement, as were the compactness and lightweight of this glass. What threw me, though, was the focal length. Because this was in the new Four Thirds System for an Olympus digital SLR (the EVOLT E-300 was used for this test), focal length doubled to 70mm. A 70mm...

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