Lens Tips

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The Editors Posted: Jan 01, 2002 0 comments

Here are 10 ways to get your creative juices flowing . . . and some great photos

1. Discover Your Own Backyard

If you put your mind to it, you can find lots of neat photo subjects right in your own backyard. (If you live in an apartment and don't have a formal backyard, don't worry—this assignment is about...

Text and photography by Ron Leach Posted: Apr 01, 2002 0 comments

Ask a group of photo enthusiasts what they have done recently to improve the quality of their images, and many will likely respond by describing the purchase of some fancy new piece of gear. Others may discuss the technical mastery of a new technique, while a few may credit a visit to an art gallery or museum for their newfound inspiration.

In fact, great photographs are rarely the result of...

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The Editors Posted: May 01, 2003 0 comments

Adding a filter or two to your camera bag is a quick and relatively inexpensive way to improve your photos

How can you tell if you need filters? Take this quick test: Do you take photographs? If the answer is yes, you very likely need some filters to get the best possible images. Here are some that can really improve many of your future photos.

The Editors Posted: Aug 01, 2003 0 comments

Sun & Games Fun with the sun...and more

1. Sun Stars
Your wide-angle lens at its smallest aperture can turn the sun into a star in your photos—fitting, since the sun actually is a star. The effect occurs because the tiny aperture diffracts the incoming light rays a lot. This diffraction causes the star effect. You can include the sun as a compositional. Photo by...

Mike Stensvold Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Autofocusing is one of the best things that's ever happened to the SLR camera. I didn't think so while testing early examples when the AF SLR era began back in 1985, but a lot of progress has happened in the ensuing two decades. Today's AF SLR cameras, film and digital, will focus more quickly and accurately than most photographers can. Naturally, the higher-end...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 17, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 1 comments
When Olympus and Panasonic launched the Micro Four Thirds system they offered adapters that enabled the use of regular Four Thirds lenses. Smart move, because it immediately expanded the library of available glass. The goal of Micro Four Thirds is smaller and lighter SLR cameras. The unanticipated benefit is compatibility with tons of lenses we all thought we’d never use again.
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Mike Stensvold Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Next to your camera body, the lenses you use with it are your most important photographic purchases. While physically, a lens is just a collection of glass or plastic elements held precisely in position in a light-tight tube, with a camera mount on one end and some means of focusing, creatively it's your...
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Mike Stensvold Posted: Jun 01, 2002 0 comments

A great tool for creative photographers

You can't beat the 35mm SLR for its combination of features, price and performance. And one its best features is its ability to accept a wide range of interchangeable lenses. From superwide fisheye to supertelephoto, macro...

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Text and photography by Mike Stensvold Posted: Jan 01, 2004 5 comments

There are lots of special-effects accessories on camera-store shelves, and they are well worth checking out if you're into special effects. But you don't need a lot of fancy accessories to create some interesting and unusual photographic effects. In fact, if you have a basic SLR (single-lens reflex) camera—film or digital—there are several special effects you can produce with no...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

Besides photographing people, nature ranks among the most popular subjects. Much of this appeal comes from the fact that there's a sense of wonder and mystery at the beauty of flora and fauna. Through photography, we can express our fascination with flowers and share it with others. Whether you enjoy shooting close-ups of a bud unfolding, or a field of wildflowers in the...

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Mike Stensvold Posted: Nov 01, 2005 2 comments

Close-up photography--taking pictures at very close range--can provide a different outlook on everyday things, reveal details unseen by the naked eye, and turn common objects into intriguing abstract images.

The traditional ways to do close-up photography involves special gear: Simple close-up diopter lenses are inexpensive but reduce sharpness noticeably...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Color often establishes the mood of a photograph, whether it's bold or subdued. Green is cool and refreshing, while red on the other hand, is fiery and passionate.

If you want to emphasize a particular color in a picture, keep in mind that some of the most pleasing color photos are ones in which one color or a group of closely related hues...

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Text and photography by Mike Stensvold Posted: Jun 01, 2005 Published: Jan 01, 2005 0 comments

Long lenses are wonderful photographic tools. Their longer-than-"normal" focal lengths magnify everything, allowing you to get "close-ups" of subjects you can't (or don't want to) approach closely. The shorter long lenses (those in the 85--120mm range, for 35mm cameras) are ideal for portraits, because they produce a good head size at a...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Feb 01, 2004 85 comments

All photos © Lou Manna

New York-based food photographer Lou Manna discusses shooting trends: "The old style of photographing food involved lots of props, edge-to-edge sharpness, dramatic, shadowy light and was shot from a high angle. On the other hand, today's...

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The Editors Posted: Feb 01, 2002 1 comments

Magic disks for the photographer

Photo filters can improve your photos, whether you shoot them with a pro camera or a point-and-shoot model, on film or digitally, still or camcorder. That's why filters exist. They're not essentials, but lots of serious photographers use them. Read on...

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