Outdoor Tips

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Mike Stensvold Posted: Feb 01, 2005 8 comments

When you focus your camera's lens on a subject, the point focused upon is sharp. Objects in the scene closer or farther than that point appear progressively less sharp as their distance from the focused point increases.

Depth of field refers to the area in front of and beyond the point focused upon in which things appear acceptably sharp in a photograph. Depth of...

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Mike Stensvold Posted: Feb 01, 2003 0 comments

All photos by Mike Stensvold unless otherwise stated.

It's probably true that real artists are born, not made. But there is a lot anyone can do to make his or her photographs more interesting, and the tips on these pages should help you improve yours.

Seeing is the fun part of...

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Mike Stensvold Posted: Apr 01, 2004 0 comments

Real-world tips for the "artistically challenged"

Great artists are probably born, not made. But there are a lot of things 'most anyone can do to make better photos. One biggie is thinking about composition when you shoot. Here are some easy ways to jump-start your creative eye.

Put It Where It Works

...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Apr 01, 2004 0 comments

You don't have to wait for good weather to photograph an intriguing sky. In its many moods, the sky can be a wonderful, ever-changing photographic subject. You can take pictures of puffy white clouds, dramatically colorful sunrises or sunsets, an ominous storm front moving in, and possibly a rainbow after the storm clears. Shoot...

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Text and photography by Lynne Eodice Posted: May 01, 2003 0 comments

You've probably seen the photos of these exquisitely sculpted sandstone buttes; like colorful waves set in stone. You may have assumed--as I once did--that this area was part of some out-of-the-way corner of a national park.



For a long time, I couldn't find much documentation on this region, nor any information in guidebooks of the...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

Beautiful scenic views rank among our most popular subjects to photograph, but surprisingly, they can be one of the most challenging subjects to capture on film or a memory card. The human eye perceives a scene differently than the camera does--we tend to see selectively, while the camera lens simply takes it all in. Also, there are elements that add to our experience...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: May 01, 2005 1 comments

About Lynne...
Lynne Eodice is a writer/photographer and popular contributor to Photographic magazine.

Morning conjures up thoughts of beautiful sunrises, the start of a new day, and perhaps brewing a cup of coffee while reading the newspaper. Photographers enjoy shooting early in the morning (and late in the day) for dramatic light. When shooting...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Jan 01, 2005 6 comments

Anyone who loves shooting scenics probably enjoys capturing the grandeur of mountains. As with most landscapes, it's best to photograph mountain scenery very late in the afternoon or very early in the morning. Some of the best high-country photos are shot by photographers who get up before daybreak or stop shooting only after dark. You'll find that an otherwise...

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The Editors Posted: Mar 01, 2005 12 comments

Beware the dark side, that famous sci-fi-movie "master" more than once cautioned his young protege re "The Force." But the dark side--a.k.a. shadows--is well worth the photographer's attention. While the eye is drawn to bright areas in a photograph, the interplay between bright and dark--between highlight and shadow--can make for a...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Jul 01, 2000 0 comments

Perhaps one of the biggest misconceptions that people have about scenic photography is the notion that the beauty of a scene will automatically be captured by a camera—all you need to do is simply point and shoot at random. After all, spectacular mountains or azure seas are awe-inspiring to...
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Lynne Eodice Posted: Aug 01, 2002 0 comments

Don't put your camera away just because the sun has gone down—some of the most intriguing photo opportunities await you after dark. From neon signs reflected on wet streets to car lights forming streaks on busy highways, nighttime offers a special blend of color and excitement. Photos taken by...
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Lynne Eodice Posted: Jan 01, 2004 0 comments

As the subject of a photograph, texture speaks to our sense of touch. The way that things feel is very ingrained in our consciousness. Texture tells us about the nature of a subject, whether it's the rough surface of a straw hat, or the silky smoothness of satin. The light that reveals an object's texture also gives us a sense of...
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Lynne Eodice Posted: Feb 01, 2003 0 comments

Photographers and painters have long been intrigued by reflections, and no wonder—there are numerous creative possibilities to be found in reflective surfaces. Whether you find fascinating images reflected in water, metal, a mirror—or even soap bubbles—there are certain tips to keep...
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Lynne Eodice Posted: May 01, 2004 0 comments

Rural scenes provide picturesque photo opportunities for those who love to get away from the hustle and bustle of city life. These settings convey feelings of tranquility. If you're like a lot of landscape shooters, scenery that includes barns, covered bridges, and miles of open fields may inspire you photographically.

...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Mar 01, 2003 0 comments

When a photo emphasizes a particular color, it often dictates the mood of the picture—be it warm or cool, bright or muted. Blue is usually associated with soothing, cool and more-somber moods. Conversely, the color red conjures up emotions like passion, heat, love, and even anger.

We often...

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