Outdoor Tips

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Jun 01, 2004 0 comments

All photos by Bob Lilly

Most of us associate the name Bob Lilly with the legendary Dallas Cowboys player--one of football's former stars, immortalized in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Coach Tom Landry has stated, "I've said this before and I'll say...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Oct 01, 2002 0 comments

Photo opportunities are abundant during the fall. You can shoot great pictures of autumn color, carved pumpkins, or children dressed in an array of Halloween costumes. Days become shorter and the light becomes warmer, which accentuates the changing fall foliage. Besides photographing colorful leaves...
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Ron Leach Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

A Unique Photographic Perspective of Our Planet

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have collaborated on a joint initiative called the Landsat project, which has resulted in a collection of stunning images that provide a unique photographic perspective of our...

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Text and photography by Mike Stensvold Posted: Jan 01, 2004 5 comments

There are lots of special-effects accessories on camera-store shelves, and they are well worth checking out if you're into special effects. But you don't need a lot of fancy accessories to create some interesting and unusual photographic effects. In fact, if you have a basic SLR (single-lens reflex) camera—film or digital—there are several special effects you can produce with no...

Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Aug 01, 2014 0 comments

The White Balance feature on your digital camera does more than advertised. Read this Easy Tip to learn how to add subtle adjustments to sunset and sunrise shots.

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The Editors Posted: Sep 01, 2004 1 comments

Electronic flash is a versatile photographic tool. From tiny units built into cameras to multi-head studio flash systems with separate power supplies, electronic flash is popular with photographers from snapshooter through pro.

Here are a few handy tips to help you get better photos with flash.

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Dec 01, 2002 0 comments

We're not suggesting that you head outside during a blizzard or hurricane, but be aware that some great photo opportunities can occur when the weather is less than perfect. Don't get into the habit of taking pictures only when the sun's out—many a great image was taken during a clearing storm...
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Ron Leach Posted: Jan 01, 2004 1 comments

For over 30 years Petersen's Photographic Magazine has been recognized as the leading instructional magazine for photo enthusiasts. Our goal has been to inspire readers with dramatic imagery, and to offer clear and simple instructional articles to help photographers improve their skills.

To further this mission, we have created the Photographic Faculty; a team of seven...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Aug 01, 2004 0 comments

All photos by Jay Dickman unless otherwise indicated.

Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Jay Dickman has covered assignments internationally as a photojournalist for the Times-Herald in Dallas, Texas, and as a contributor to National Geographic, as well as shooting for most...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Jan 01, 2003 0 comments

Always artistic, Judith Pishnery was a natural choice to be her high school's yearbook photographer--an initial foray that resulted in her becoming "hooked" on photography. And, because one of her science teachers also taught photography on the side, "I would hang out in the biology department," she recalls.

...

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Mike Stensvold Posted: Jun 01, 2004 0 comments

Photographs of beautiful landscapes made in the right conditions can be absolutely stunning. The keys are to be there in those conditions, and to be ready to record them when you find them.

You can greatly enhance your chances of being there at the right time by doing your research. It's frustrating to travel to a stunning scenic site, only to be socked in by a blizzard—or to find...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 27, 2014 0 comments

Every photographer has a personal vision and a particular taste in composition, light, color and so on. For example, many photographers chose nature’s details simply to abstract the color and form they find. Others like to use extremely shallow depth of field—also called selective focus—so only a sliver of the subject is sharp while the rest of it is soft. People who are intrigued by the beauty, intricacy and complexity of nature usually shoot with the opposite approach. They want to reveal as much detail in the subjects as possible so those who view their work can appreciate the designs and the patterns in the images with tack sharp clarity.

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Mike Stensvold Posted: Aug 01, 2004 0 comments

Shooting good photos in dim light is challenging, but can also be quite rewarding, because capturing the feel of the existing light generally produces a more pleasant picture than using on-camera flash.

The basic problems facing the low-light photographer are being able to use a fast enough shutter speed to permit hand-held shooting, and being able to use a small enough lens aperture to...

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Lynne Eodice Posted: Jul 01, 2003 0 comments

All photos by Don Gale

Have you ever embarked on an exciting wilderness adventure that promised great photo opportunities, only to be disappointed with your images after you got home? Maybe the skies in your pictures weren't as blue as you remembered them, or the colors as vivid. Perhaps the grand vistas you experienced appeared a little washed-out in your...

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The Editors Posted: Sep 01, 2003 3 comments

Some ways to help offset the cost of your favorite pastime

There are lots of way to make money in photography, including selling and trading photo gear, processing film and making prints for other photographers, scanning images (slides, negatives and prints) and putting them on CDs for others, retouching photos, copying and restoring old photos, collecting collectible photographs...

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