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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Aug 01, 1999 0 comments

I mean, how hard can it be?
The subjects don't move. They pose patiently and endlessly. They
show up when they're supposed to and will pretty much give you
the same look today that they gave yesterday.Archit...

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Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Nov 01, 2003 0 comments

Henry Wilhelm is a true leader in the field of image permanence. Involved in photography since childhood, Henry became interested in the preservation of photographs in 1963 while working in the hot and humid jungles of Bolivia while serving in the Peace...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Apr 01, 2004 0 comments

Many times, when I have been out driving, whether looking for pictures or not, I often catch a glimpse of an image as I pass along the road. I'll stop, go back, get out my camera and make some exposures. At other times, if without a camera, I might...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 01, 2003 0 comments

The Blend

Why do it? Why join the technologies, film and digital, and go to work in the digital darkroom by scanning your 4x5 negatives into your computer?

Because you can. And because it's fun to...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jan 01, 1998 0 comments

We're tempted to start
off with, "This man is a professional, don't try this at
home," but we won't. First because, strictly speaking, Dave
Frieder isn't a professional--photographyis...

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Staff Posted: Jul 21, 2011 Published: Jun 01, 2011 0 comments
When we first saw these images we were struck with a strong sense of history, of our own nostalgia for scenes and places long gone, and overall how photographers should, to paraphrase Walker Evans, photograph with a sense of history in mind. Some of the photos from this collection have the almost eerie calm of the best of Atget, while others are akin to street scenes casually snapped that would later become treasured mementos of an age. We thank The Granger Collection and the Museum of the City of New York for allowing us to share some of these images with you.
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Staff Posted: Nov 14, 2011 Published: Oct 01, 2011 0 comments
Editor’s note: One of the joys of attending photokina in Cologne, Germany every two years was the display at the Polaroid stand (they had a hall to themselves) where works by renowned artists and photographers on Polaroid materials would be displayed. When the old company went out of business many of us were concerned with what happened to that collection. Now, the International Polaroid Collection has been preserved, thanks to the Impossible Project and WestLicht. Following is their official announcement, plus they courteously granted us permission to reproduce a few images from the vast collection as well.
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Staff Posted: Aug 12, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 1 comments
Architecture inhabits and embodies time; whether months or centuries in duration, a building’s life cycle of construction, transformation and afterlife gives tangible form to history and turns public space into an index of the past. A photographic image is literally made of time, showing viewers the projection of an instant in history. When engaging with a photograph of a built environment as it once looked, we find ourselves immersed in an historical experience that was without precedent before the invention of photography in 1839.
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Rick Sammon Posted: Aug 01, 2000 0 comments

Okay, so I lied--but it's a small, white lie. Please let me explain. I do go on location (and on assignment) with just two lenses: my 100-400mm Image Stabilizer zoom and my 17-35mm zoom. My tiny fib is that I use a 1.4x tele-converter (some would call...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Sep 01, 2003 0 comments

The objects in Sal Lopes' latest photographs reveal themselves in surprising ways. Objects that appear insignificant to the naked eye become multidimensional as they unfold in full splendor in the darkroom. In one macro photograph a tiny rock takes...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Apr 01, 2004 0 comments

"It is impossible for anyone to go out and photograph something and not have it reflect who they are. It's almost intangible. You can analyze and say it's the cropping or it's the lens, but the mystique remains."
--Daniel Morduchowicz

...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Oct 01, 2005 1 comments

Fifteen years ago Ann Johansson left Gothenburg, Sweden, and came to America. She was looking for "sunshine" but she may just have found the end of the rainbow. For seven years her real-life job was waitressing in Los Angeles. Her hobby was taking pictures.

"It took me a while to realize you could actually make a living here having a...

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Andrea Keister Posted: Feb 01, 2003 0 comments

The Recreations Of David B. Brooks

Each month in Shutterbug our own David B. Brooks reveals why he's an expert in the field...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Mar 01, 1999 0 comments

Aside from the intricacies of exposure and light metering, photo enthusiasts generally find depth of field the most difficult concept to master. That's understandable particularly since this is a hypothetical factor based on subjective judgment.

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Sep 01, 1999 0 comments

The idea is as old as composition itself: lead the viewer into the picture.

"If there's any hesitation on the part of the viewer, the picture fails," says nature photographer Tony Sweet. "Viewers should go right...

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