Features

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Mike Matzkin Posted: Aug 01, 1999 0 comments

The 50mm lens may be the best focal length in 35mm photography. A good 50mm lens is going to be sharper than practically any other focal length and it's going to be free of apparent distortion. It is also generally the fastest available lens with...

Filed under
Dave Howard Posted: Jul 01, 2000 0 comments

Growing up in the 1950s, I remember envying a friend who lived down the block, because his dad took their vacation pictures on slide film and projected them. I marveled at the 6' wide Kodachrome majesty of faraway places like Yellowstone...

Filed under
Rosalind Smith Posted: Feb 01, 2003 0 comments

Resonant Images

It is a spiritually rewarding experience to stand before the black and white photographs of David Fokos. The mood created by the large areas of rich blacks is haunting while the isolation of objects conjures...

Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Epson is really pushing the limits with desktop scanners, bringing near drum-scanner quality down to the sub-$800 price range. With two new scanners on display at PMA, Epson had the major news in this category. First up is the Perfection V700 PHOTO. With an estimated price of $549.99, the scanner uses Epson's Dual Lens optics. The Dual Lens System automatically selects...

Filed under
Steve Bedell Posted: Nov 01, 1999 0 comments

Pity the poor portrait and wedding photographer, and I include myself in that group. For years we've been reading about how digital imaging and the Internet are revolutionizing photography, and we've been sitting on the sidelines. Well...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 2004 0 comments

Lin Alder changed his mind. And his style, too.

"I came to photography initially as a black and white large format landscape photographer," Lin says. "Ansel Adams was my primary inspiration, as he was for a lot of...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 01, 2000 0 comments

The phrase "the art of observation" appears at Tony Sweet's web site (www.tonysweetphotography.com), but Sweet's photography depends on more than merely observing. "We all see the same things,"...

Filed under
Jay Abend Posted: Jul 01, 1999 0 comments

I have begun shooting digitally at home more and more, only because of the darned convenience of even a modest digital Ricoh camera. I have a moderately priced consumer megapixel camera that takes those matchbook sized wafer-thin Smart Media memory cards.

Filed under
Rosalind Smith Posted: Jan 01, 1998 0 comments

Peter McDonough is concerned
with perception; not the physiological aspects of perception, but rather
how the eye sees and converts its image, what people see and what they
don't see of a given subject. Quotingthe...

Filed under
Steve Anchell Posted: Jul 01, 2005 0 comments

It was a hot and thirsty afternoon. A light thundershower had left the parched earth thirsting for more. Four of the roughest, toughest photographers in the Wild West met on the empty street in front of 21st Amendment liquor store. A challenge had been made and they were here to accept. Rough and ready "Wild Bill" Ellzey, sporting a Nikon D70, was leaning against the...

Steve Bedell Posted: Dec 01, 2000 0 comments

This article is aimed mostly at professional photographers but if you don't count yourself among them, please continue reading anyway because I think you'll find some very useful information. Having said that, let's consider one of the most common yet...

Filed under
Mike Matzkin Posted: Aug 01, 2000 0 comments

This is about putting some of the fun, mystery, and control back into image making. Do you ever feel that something is interfering in the process of making a photograph? That somehow you are not in control of it? Some of that feeling has to do with...

Filed under
Staff Posted: Sep 20, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 0 comments
On December 12, 1925, the world’s first motel opened just north of Santa Barbara. At that time, the Milestone Mo-Tel in San Luis Obispo sat along the nascent two-lane highway, the “101,” and charged $1.25 a night for a bungalow with an attached garage. The era of automobiles as status symbol had begun; for it was only those with cruise-worthy cars that would stop at the Motel Inn on their way between LA and San Francisco.
Filed under
Staff Posted: Apr 12, 2013 Published: Mar 01, 2013 2 comments
Color in photography has had a checkered history. Although photographs in color had been desired since the medium’s invention in the nineteenth century, commercially viable color photographic processes were not available until the early twentieth century. By that time, monochromatic photography had become a common part of everyday life, so much so that black-and-white images seemed “real” despite their chromatic deficiencies. As color photographic technologies developed, discussions about the realism of black and white versus color emerged.
Filed under
Shutterbug Staff Posted: Sep 01, 2010 2 comments

In the 1930s, a small group of California photographers challenged the painterly, soft-focus Pictorialist style of the day. They argued that photography could only advance as an art if its practitioners exploited characteristics inherent to the camera’s mechanical nature. This small association of innovators created Group f/64, named after the camera aperture which produces great depth of...

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading