35mm Cameras

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Tony Sweet Posted: Apr 01, 2003 0 comments

The Hasselbald Xpan

Miles Davis, the jazz great, would say, "When you see something that you can do, you know it right away." It follows that my love affair with the Hasselblad Xpan was love at first sight, or actually love at second sight. I was briefly introduced to...

Jason Schneider Posted: May 01, 2007 16 comments

Horseman is a name associated with high-quality, large format Japanese view and press cameras and lenses, but it's also noted for innovative designs. An excellent example is the Horseman 3D, the company's first 35mm stereo rangefinder camera. Basically it's a Hasselblad Xpan II that's been modified by installing a unit containing two 38mm f/2.8 Super...

Sandy Ritz and Dean Ritz Posted: Jan 01, 2006 30 comments

The history of the Kardon camera is a story of forgotten American genius. The Kardon camera, manufactured in several variations from 1945-'54 represents an important American contribution to the then-state-of-the-art "miniature" camera. And it represents Peter Kardon's patriotic effort to answer to the US military's need for a high-quality 35mm camera...

Roger W. Hicks Posted: Dec 01, 2004 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Roger W. Hicks, All Rights Reserved

 

The Leica MP is the greatest Leica for years--maybe decades. If you want a classic all-mechanical Leica, and you can afford a new one, this is the one to buy. That's all there is to it.

So much for the short review: how about a longer one? Well, it is best summed up in three words:...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Oct 01, 2000 0 comments

Exceptionally small, light, and very solid are the descriptive attributes of this compact camera. It is an example of German precise engineering and design. A throwback to the fully manual operating camera era. The film speed ISO has to be set...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Apr 01, 2006 1 comments

The Zeiss Ikon--hereafter ZI--has all the features you might hope for, plus optional autoexposure. At $1617, the body lists between Leica and Voigtländer. In features, it goes head-to-head with the Leica M7. Because we received the camera and no fewer than six lenses--15mm f/2.8, 21mm f/2.8, 25mm f/2.8, 28mm f/2.8, 35mm f/2, and 50mm f/2--we have split...

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W.L. Fadner Posted: May 01, 2002 0 comments

The MZ-S is Pentax's recently
introduced professional level camera with new styling and some excellent
new features. It is the replacement camera for the Pentax PZ-1P, although
that camera is still available.

Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2006 0 comments

If a picture is really brilliant, you don't have to worry about grain or sharpness or anything else: to quote Mike Gristwood, late of Ilford, "How much good would it do you to know the technical details of any one of Henri Cartier-Bresson's pictures?"

By the same token, if a picture is really bad, no amount of technical brilliance is going...

Jason Schneider Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

This month we begin a new column with renowned "camera collector" Jason Schneider. Jason will be out there scouring camera stores, Internet sites, and camera shows to bring you the best bargains in user collectibles, recent gems, and vintage gear.
--Editor

 

Is there a camera enthusiast on the planet who hasn't pored over the...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Feb 01, 2000 0 comments

Anyone who reads the ads in photo magazines even occasionally, will be well aware of the 35mm cameras designated as "professional." Just about every manufacturer offers at least one and generally prices it far above its "amateur" counterparts. These models hold a lot of...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2001 0 comments

Contax N1
Now the flagship of the Contax line, the N1 has a new, larger N-mount that's completely electronic and accepts only AF lenses. Most incorporate an ultrasonic focus motor for silent, high-speed operation. With an adapter, it...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Apr 01, 2007 5 comments

Pick up the new Bessa R3M (or R2M--only the viewfinders differ) and it takes you back in time. At a solid 430 gm (a fraction over 15 oz) it has the heft and overall feel of a high-quality camera from the 1950s or '60s. Appropriately, it is the best Bessa yet, produced to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the founding of Voigtländer, and is engraved...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

Just when you thought the R2 was the pinnacle of Voigtländer Bessa design, along came the R2A and R3A. They differ from the R2 in several ways, most notably the adoption of an electronic shutter allowing Aperture Priority automation; this is combined with a new meter. Other significant differences are a revised (and easier-to-use) rewind crank; the addition of a back lock...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Sep 01, 2006 0 comments

Is there still a demand for an entry-level film SLR camera? The folks at Voigtländer seem to think so, evidenced by their new VSL 43. It is very much an entry-level SLR, with a manually set (but completely battery-dependent) shutter from 1/2 sec to 1/2000 sec, flash sync at 1/60 sec, manual focusing, manual diaphragm, and manual film advance. There is a through-lens meter...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Dec 01, 2001 0 comments

Compact 35mm cameras have continued to monopolize the marketplace this past year with new product introductions exceeding new APS compacts by more than 2 to 1. The new models of 35mm products have ever-longer zoom ranges out to a whopping 170mm telephoto on several models with a broad 4.5x zoom...

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