Software & Computers

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Jack Neubart Posted: May 30, 2014 Published: May 01, 2014 0 comments
DxO Optics Pro is a Raw converter that keeps pace with the ever-growing, ever-changing world of digital photography. The newest version—DxO Optics Pro 9 (for Mac or Windows)—focuses on one of digital imaging’s most troubling artifacts: digital noise. Whether you’re shooting at high ISOs or bringing out blocked shadow detail in a seriously underexposed image or an HDR photo, digital noise (luminance and chrominance) can rear its ugly head. And now we can finally deliver a knockout punch to this culprit. But before you get in the ring, there are a few things you should know.
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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

There is a substantial interest in black and white among photo enthusiasts, particularly if you include infrared. That's why Epson, Canon, and HP developed printers capable of reproducing good black and white prints. On the camera side of digital, however, there is only one quite high-end black and white possibility I currently know of--the MegaVision medium format...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 24, 2014 Published: Jan 01, 2014 0 comments
I have always had mixed feelings about so-called “film simulation” software, programs that offer one-click presets that add effects and options for manipulating digital images. On one side, I am unsure why the designers use visual references to types of film for their preset IDs. It strikes me that an increasingly small proportion of folks relate to them. On the other side, I admire their offering programs that open up a raft of image expressions in easy to attain fashion. I will not revisit that discussion here, although the near concomitant release of two such programs, Alien Skin’s Exposure 5 and DxO’s FilmPack 4, makes it tempting to do so.
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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 01, 2003 0 comments

Photographers, as a group, are far from united in their view of the role Adobe Systems' Photoshop plays in the imaging process. Some believe that many of Photoshop's creative tools are designed for "photographers who don't know how to take pictures correctly" or...

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 01, 2004 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Joe Farace, All Rights Reserved

I never much liked any of Adobe Systems' previous versions of Photoshop Elements. Sure, the program had its place as an $99 alternative for digital imagers on a budget, however, the interface was confusing, trying too hard to be easy to use, and in the process making it more complicated than the...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Jul 01, 2002 0 comments

When I read the general description of what was new in Photoshop 7.0, my expectations were high that what I would experience would justify a full upgrade number from 6.0 to 7.0. After whining to the Photoshop team about poor retouching tools for the...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2004 0 comments

Once you use a pen and tablet for your digital darkroom work you rarely go back to mousing around. Aside from avoiding repetitive stress problems, working with a pen and tablet makes the work faster, smoother, and in all ways cooler. Wacom Technology Corporation, whose pens and tablets have been with us for years, seems to be on a constant...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Steve Bedell, All Rights Reserved

The rapidly changing world of professional photography has photographers scrambling to grasp all the new technology. Some photographers are film based, some use a mix of film and digital, and many (like me) are now 100 percent digital. But all photographers I talk to express the same concern--how can they increase...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

I have a bunch of prints on the walls and desktops of my studio, and I almost can't believe my eyes. For years I have been stubbornly teaching that image resolution (in pixel dimensions) and physical print size were in lock step, and even scoffed at a camera maker for claiming that their 5-megapixel digicam could produce 20x24 prints. Make a good 13x19 from anything less...

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George Schaub Posted: Jun 01, 2009 0 comments

When I first worked with and reviewed Genuine Fractals back in 2006, I posited that it made the megapixel race moot in the way it allowed even small files to be used for big enlargements.

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Jack Neubart Posted: May 01, 2009 0 comments

How many times have you traveled somewhere and taken a beautiful picture without quite knowing where you were at that instant later? That’s where “geotagging” (or “geocoding”) enters the picture.

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Howard Millard Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

Whether you’re starting with a portrait, landscape, or still life, it’s easy to use edge effects to give your images a distinctive look. The software we will be looking at goes from the “traditional” to the “edgy.” Most are plug-ins, but some also work as stand-alone programs, and one system is comprised of image files. Many offer literally thousands of...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

I've got to confess that when I received the software from Graphic Authority it took me a while to look at it. Why? Because I'm not the most technical guy. I use Photoshop daily but that doesn't mean I'm an expert. I pretty much just do the same thing all the time. If they had sent me one CD with a few things to look at, no problem. But what I received was...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 08, 2012 Published: Jul 01, 2012 1 comments
Attempting to make the HDR process more user-friendly, the newly updated HDR Expose and Photoshop-dedicated plug-in 32 Float, now both in Version 2, largely share the same features and enhancements. As I see it, the improvements center mainly on workflow—reason enough to upgrade, in my opinion, and reason enough to consider these as serious tools for HDR work. Both are available from Unified Color Technologies.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 19, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 10 comments
The merge to HDR process has for too long been a mystery wrapped inside an enigma. That cloak of mystery is one giant step closer to being removed thanks to HDR Express, from Unified Color Technologies (www.unifiedcolor.com). While this software greatly simplifies the process, successful HDR merges don’t just happen when you click a button. There is some planning involved.

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