Software & Computers
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Jack Neubart Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

How can you make the most use out of that limited quantity of memory cards when on the road, especially on a long trip? The answer: a portable drive. When connected to a host computer via USB 2.0, all these devices are recognized as an external drive--but not immediately in some cases: it may require activation of a USB function on the device. Adding to the utility of many of...

Software & Computers
George Schaub Sep 05, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 1 comments
The question is—does anybody really know what a given image would look like if they shot it on Kodachrome 25, or Fuji Acros, or some obscure color negative film that even in film’s heyday was little used or appreciated? Perhaps the more pertinent question is—how many people have made photographs using film? But film references are what a number of so-called film emulation software programs use for describing presets that can be applied to a digital image. Half academic and half nostalgic, the programs use film brand names to describe saturation, contrast, color nuance, and grain structure variations that are then applied to an image. Perhaps using film names is better than poetic fantasy terms, like “misty blue dawn,” but then again entirely subjective descriptors, rather than supposedly clinical ones used in these software programs, might be just as handy for today’s photography crowd. In any case, I recently tested one such program, DxO’s FilmPack 3.1, to see if it offered up creative variations that could be used as is or as foundation images when interpreting subjects and scenes.

Software & Computers
Howard Millard Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

Whether you shoot raw or JPEG, whether you’re on the Windows or Mac platform, the latest edition of DxO Optics Pro, Version 5.3, offers sophisticated automated image enhancement and raw conversion.

Software & Computers
Jack Neubart Jul 19, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 16 comments
DxO Optics Pro Version 7 is a Raw converter for Mac and Microsoft Windows with some nifty tricks up its sleeve. It offers its own brand of nondestructive image editing, with tonal, exposure, geometric, and optical corrections that make it stand apart from the crowd. As was true of Version 6.6, Optics Pro 7 supports the company’s new FilmPack 3 film emulator plug-in (see sidebar below). We will have a more complete review of the film emulator in a future issue.

Optics Pro Version 7 is a dramatic departure from earlier releases. The Select pane is gone, so you no longer have to deal with tedious Projects (unless you want to). Now you go straight to work after opening a folder. Double-click on an image and that takes you right to the nondestructive editing phase, in Customize. Beyond this point the Mac and Windows versions part ways in one key respect: the Windows version runs faster than the Mac version, which continues to be laborious.

Software & Computers
Darryl C. Nicholas Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

For those of you who have Adobe's Photoshop installed on your computer, I'm sure that you know all about re-sizing pictures down and converting them to JPEG before attaching them to an e-mail.

This short tip is for everyone else.

Microsoft Windows XP has made the job very easy. All you need is to be using the Win-XP operating system and the...

Software & Computers
David B. Brooks May 01, 2008 0 comments

In the summer of 2007 I received news about a new version of SilverFast scanning software that included additional and improved features, most significantly for this report something dubbed Multi-Exposure. This is a strategy involving two scan passes: one with normal exposure and a second with amplified exposure applied just to the shadow regions of the film image; then these two...

David B. Brooks Dec 01, 1999 0 comments

Yes, when you can't find that file, and you forget the file name, don't just get angry, and voice an expletive, put the latest computer acronym in your vocabulary. DAM stands for Digital Asset Management, and is one of the hottest software...

Software & Computers
Howard Millard May 01, 2004 0 comments

Where in the world is that wonderful shot you took last summer of Carolyn at the lake? And whatever happened to those great photos from the trip to Yellowstone that you want to e-mail to a friend? Whether your digital pictures are from a digital camera, scans from prints, negatives (or slides...

Howard Millard Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Does it seem that your hard drive is filling up with digital image files faster than the speed of light? Where in the world is that shot you took last summer of Steve water-skiing, and whatever happened to those great photos from the trip to Death Valley that you want to e-mail to a friend? Whether your digital pictures are from a digital camera, scans from prints, negatives, or...

Anthony L. Celeste Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

Just about every one of us has suffered through at least one data disaster, where we’ve lost a significant number of photos or other important files.

Software & Computers
Jack Neubart Mar 01, 2009 1 comments

I thought that transferring my files to an external drive was all that I needed to ensure the safety of my photo library—until that external drive crashed!

Cris Daniels Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

Using the current hardware and software technology available, digital imaging now provides a virtually unlimited palette of capabilities for photographers. Along with the various benefits that come with this control, there are also numerous variables that...

John Stewart Feb 01, 2002 0 comments

Many photographers in the market no longer carry heavy cases full of prints or transparencies to display their craft. Instead, many send out samples of their work on computer CDs. As the world becomes more wired and Internet...

Software & Computers
David B. Brooks Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

There is a substantial interest in black and white among photo enthusiasts, particularly if you include infrared. That's why Epson, Canon, and HP developed printers capable of reproducing good black and white prints. On the camera side of digital, however, there is only one quite high-end black and white possibility I currently know of--the MegaVision medium format...

Software & Computers
George Schaub Feb 24, 2014 Published: Jan 01, 2014 0 comments
I have always had mixed feelings about so-called “film simulation” software, programs that offer one-click presets that add effects and options for manipulating digital images. On one side, I am unsure why the designers use visual references to types of film for their preset IDs. It strikes me that an increasingly small proportion of folks relate to them. On the other side, I admire their offering programs that open up a raft of image expressions in easy to attain fashion. I will not revisit that discussion here, although the near concomitant release of two such programs, Alien Skin’s Exposure 5 and DxO’s FilmPack 4, makes it tempting to do so.