Software & Computers

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David B. Brooks Posted: Jun 10, 2011 Published: May 01, 2011 6 comments
A Shutterbug reader, Tracy Valleau, e-mailed me, suggesting that I take a look at the 24” widescreen Dell UltraSharp U2410 LCD display with 1920x1200 pixel resolution. What makes it suitable for digital photography and professional graphics is its wide color gamut of 96 percent of Adobe RGB and the fact that its white luminance is adjustable from 80.0 to 90.0 CD/m2, both of which provide a high reproduction screen image quality. Its 12-bit internal processing assures a smooth rendition of tones on screen. The screen is in a bezel and stand that is sturdy but light, with an excellent design that’s carefully manufactured. In all respects, this Dell U2410 is quite affordable at a list price of $599, while entirely competitive with more expensive brands favored for a color-managed digital photography workflow.
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Howard Millard Posted: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments

Are you ready to ramp up your photos with striking special effects? Web Euphoria (I love the name) offers more than 20 effects that you access from 19 plug-ins within Photoshop compatible programs such as Adobe Photoshop (Versions 2.5 through CS) and...

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Joe Farace Posted: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

These days, digital minilabs from Agfa and Fuji have made producing inexpensive, good looking prints directly from memory cards as easy as shooting film, but just as the person who wants to create more expressive film images needs the creative control...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

I'm going to take you on a trip to the not so long ago past, maybe about the year 2000 BD (Before Digital). Let's watch a photographer from Snap Studio go about his wedding order. First he shoots the job on two cameras, the "big" medium format camera for color and the little 35mm camera for his artsy black and white shots. He's careful to number his...

Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

"There is nothing worse than a brilliant image of a fuzzy concept." --Ansel Adams

It could be that the sainted Adams meant a fuzzy image of a brilliant concept, but we'll never know. This month's column looks at using imaging software to blur an image and was inspired by a letter from reader Carol Baker. As a movie buff you gotta know...

Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

"Crankshaft: I want to buy a camera. Photo clerk: Digital? Crankshaft: No I plan to operate it with my toes."
--"Crankshaft" comic strip

Steve Kennedy is a photographer, automobile expert, and author of Jaguar: The Classic Marque (

Joe Farace Posted: Jan 01, 2006 0 comments

This month's column contains practical and creative software from around the world, including something new from Greece's gift to the imaging world, Panos Efstathiadis. It's rare to see artists working together, but Efstathiadis' Stamp, that appears at the end of this column, is part of Frank Hatcher's WZ2K Cork Board Photoshop Action set. Some of...

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Susan Ruddick Bloom Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

Corel's Painter (now in Version X) started years ago as a black and white program called Sketcher, which came in a cigar box package. Over the years it was owned by a variety of companies and was even sold in a paint can. The program has matured and is unrivaled in its ability to mimic natural artistic mediums like pastel, oil paint, charcoal, watercolor, and more.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

How can you make the most use out of that limited quantity of memory cards when on the road, especially on a long trip? The answer: a portable drive. When connected to a host computer via USB 2.0, all these devices are recognized as an external drive--but not immediately in some cases: it may require activation of a USB function on the device. Adding to the utility of many of...

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George Schaub Posted: Sep 05, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 1 comments
The question is—does anybody really know what a given image would look like if they shot it on Kodachrome 25, or Fuji Acros, or some obscure color negative film that even in film’s heyday was little used or appreciated? Perhaps the more pertinent question is—how many people have made photographs using film? But film references are what a number of so-called film emulation software programs use for describing presets that can be applied to a digital image. Half academic and half nostalgic, the programs use film brand names to describe saturation, contrast, color nuance, and grain structure variations that are then applied to an image. Perhaps using film names is better than poetic fantasy terms, like “misty blue dawn,” but then again entirely subjective descriptors, rather than supposedly clinical ones used in these software programs, might be just as handy for today’s photography crowd. In any case, I recently tested one such program, DxO’s FilmPack 3.1, to see if it offered up creative variations that could be used as is or as foundation images when interpreting subjects and scenes.

Dan Havlik Posted: Oct 30, 2014 0 comments

DxO Labs has launched the latest version of its Raw convertor/editor/organizer: DxO OpticsPro 10. The follow-up to DxO Optics Pro 9, which we reviewed earlier this year, DxO OpticsPro 10 adds the new ClearView feature, that's designed to reduce atmospheric haze in images.

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Howard Millard Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

Whether you shoot raw or JPEG, whether you’re on the Windows or Mac platform, the latest edition of DxO Optics Pro, Version 5.3, offers sophisticated automated image enhancement and raw conversion.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 19, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 16 comments
DxO Optics Pro Version 7 is a Raw converter for Mac and Microsoft Windows with some nifty tricks up its sleeve. It offers its own brand of nondestructive image editing, with tonal, exposure, geometric, and optical corrections that make it stand apart from the crowd. As was true of Version 6.6, Optics Pro 7 supports the company’s new FilmPack 3 film emulator plug-in (see sidebar below). We will have a more complete review of the film emulator in a future issue.

Optics Pro Version 7 is a dramatic departure from earlier releases. The Select pane is gone, so you no longer have to deal with tedious Projects (unless you want to). Now you go straight to work after opening a folder. Double-click on an image and that takes you right to the nondestructive editing phase, in Customize. Beyond this point the Mac and Windows versions part ways in one key respect: the Windows version runs faster than the Mac version, which continues to be laborious.

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

For those of you who have Adobe's Photoshop installed on your computer, I'm sure that you know all about re-sizing pictures down and converting them to JPEG before attaching them to an e-mail.

This short tip is for everyone else.

Microsoft Windows XP has made the job very easy. All you need is to be using the Win-XP operating system and the...

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David B. Brooks Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

In the summer of 2007 I received news about a new version of SilverFast scanning software that included additional and improved features, most significantly for this report something dubbed Multi-Exposure. This is a strategy involving two scan passes: one with normal exposure and a second with amplified exposure applied just to the shadow regions of the film image; then these two...

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