Software & Computers

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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments

Corel's KPT Collection Quick Look
· MAC and Windows compatible
· $99.99 -- US

Further Information
COREL'S KPT COLLECTION

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

The idea of loading an image and pushing a button and seeing what happens may be anathema to some photographers, but for certain images where you might want an extra-special touch done easy it might just do the trick.

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David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

Image-editing applications that run on a Windows PC have been available since the early 1990s. In that decade and a half digital photography has grown and changed dramatically, requiring new and different kinds of image-editing support. One of the applications that has been around for most of that time is Paint Shop Pro, now under Corel's ownership. Over the years it has...

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David B. Brooks Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

As PCs evolved from the early to the mid-1990s and more and more had color monitors there was a flurry of interest among application programmers to develop and offer paint programs, mostly to provide computer users with a creative opportunity to make digital art. As color scanners became more available in the consumer market these paint applications were also used to input...

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Howard Millard Posted: Mar 01, 2010 0 comments

For portrait, wedding, landscape, and fine art photographers, Corel’s new Painter 11 excels when you want to emulate traditional art media from your images, including oil paint on canvas, pastels on textured art paper, woodcut, silkscreen, watercolor, and more.

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Howard Millard Posted: Sep 01, 2006 0 comments

Would you like to transform your photographs into striking works of art echoing oil paint on canvas, charcoal on textured art paper, woodcut, silkscreen, watercolor, pastel, pencil drawing, even mosaic tiles or scores of other natural art media? Whether for your own artistic expression or to broaden the services you offer to clients, creating naturalistic art directly from...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Aug 01, 2005 0 comments

Now that Corel's Painter has arrived at version number IX, it gives some indication that the application has been around for some time, over a dozen years in fact. Even though it is very well established in the computer art and illustration worlds it is not as well-known in digital photography. Part of the reason is that in the past it had an incredibly complex user...

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Howard Millard Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

Compatible with both Mac and Windows, Corel's new Painter X can transform your portrait, landscape, and still life photos into images that emulate oil paint on canvas, charcoal on textured art paper, woodcut, silkscreen, watercolor, pastel, pencil drawing, mosaic tile, and scores of other natural art media. You can start by enlisting Version X's enhanced automatic...

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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

In just about any discussion of photo editors for Windows, Corel’s PHOTO-PAINT is widely considered to be the high-end competition to Adobe’s Photoshop. Earlier this year, Corel released Version X4 (Version 14) of PHOTO-PAINT. This version ships with numerous new features. The most obvious change to PHOTO-PAINT is the addition of the Welcome Screen that displays when opening the...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

CPAC Imaging PRO, Version 3.0, is sold mainly as a retouching software for professionals with a sell line that says, "Outstanding results in just minutes." But it's much more than that. While Adobe's Photoshop is the de facto software for professional image-makers, that doesn't mean that there are not other applications that can perform some of...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

"Of course, there will always be those who look only at technique, who ask `how,' while others of a more curious nature will ask `why.' Personally, I have always preferred inspiration to information."--Man Ray

ACDSee Pro: Digital Coincidence?
On the same day Adobe Systems announced the public beta of...

Staff Posted: Sep 14, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 2 comments
There’s no question that do-it-yourself photo books have captured the imagination of photographers, from pros to those who simply want to create a remembrance of a journey or to gather family photos. While just about every imaging software and online picture service, from iPhoto to Shutterfly, offers quick and easy bookmaking, there are some companies dedicated to serving the higher-end market, generally pros but also including every photographer who wants a stylish, custom-designed book. Software to help design the book is a key ingredient, as are options for book materials and binding. And in the end, the quality of the images reproduced, and the facility of ordering and making images ready, is what makes the bookmaking process a creative, fun project that will result in a book that will be cherished for many years.
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Jon Canfield Posted: Sep 06, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 2 comments
One of the most common complaints about digital imaging is the lack of consistency when going from one device to another—most commonly screen to print. Dark prints are the typical complaint, but color shifts are also a contributor to choice language and lack of hair. Yes, we tweak the image until the sky is that perfect hue of blue, or the skin tones have just the right amount of warmth and vibrancy. When it’s all done, the image is posted online or printed and it looks nothing like what we expected. The image is too dark, skin tones are too red, any number of problems. Where did it go wrong?

In almost all cases, the culprit is an uncalibrated display. Back when CRT displays were the common screen type, color could be wildly different and it was usually pretty easy to detect when the display was at fault. With modern LCD displays that isn’t necessarily the case—color is often close to correct in hue, but luminance, or brightness, is where the problem usually lies.

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Jon Canfield Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

“The Spyder3Express is the latest incarnation of Datacolor’s monitor calibration hardware. It does one thing—calibrate your display—and does it well.”...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

According to the folks at Tribeca Imaging Laboratories (TIL), digital cameras (and I might add many types of film) "can't see purple." They go on to say, "The digital color model generates a limited spectrum. Any user can confirm this by simply pointing a camera at a deep blue or purple object and comparing the colors on the camera's LCD or computer...

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