Software & Computers

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Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 10, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 5 comments
Capture One Pro stands as the Raw converter and digital asset manager of choice among many pro photographers, notably those using Phase One backs. But this software also supports many, many other cameras, with profiles for over 250 models plus a wide range of lenses. Version 7 (V7) has some new features of note, so I checked it out to see if an upgrade from 6 is advisable, and if it might tempt users of Adobe Lightroom/ACR. For this test I ran Capture One Pro 7 on a 27” iMac under OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, with 8GB of RAM.
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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Mar 01, 2007 2 comments

If you think a notebook computer is a scaled-down compromise with a cramped keyboard and tiny screen, think again. Notebooks have become an indispensable tool for photographers. Choosing the right one is easy--there are a few core components that determine how well a computer will perform over the long haul. Here is what you need to know:

Size...

Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

Consistently achieving accurate color may be digital photography's most difficult skill to master. Shooting the same subject under different lighting conditions can cause unacceptable color variations which can be difficult and time consuming to correct later. Digital cameras have many more color balance options than film ever did, but when the ambient lighting changes from...

Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

It's clear that color management is a hot topic, and products that provide accurate results with a minimum amount of fuss or techno-jargon are in high demand. Two new products fit this need perfectly, plus there is one that handles the needs of the more advanced user.

Pantone, along with GretagMacbeth, has brought out the smallest display calibration device...

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Cris Daniels Posted: Sep 01, 2003 0 comments

One of the most beneficial and cost-effective procedures that anyone involved in digital imaging can perform is calibration and profiling of their computer display. Implementing a successful color management workflow begins with this task, and rewards the user with a high degree of accuracy...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

What happens when you go back to the drawing board and redesign a successful product? If you were to base your answer on some of the movie sequels that have come out, the results would not be good. Thankfully, Pantone ColorVision has avoided the Hollywood syndrome and come out with a real winner. The recently introduced new version of the popular Spyder hardware calibration system...

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Scott Eldridge Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

The surging popularity of monochromatic images in fine art and graphic design has led photographers and artists to devise their own Photoshop techniques to convert their color images to black and white. Unfortunately, the Photoshop function of Desaturate falls far short in giving the needed control of the monochromatic conversion process. Other Photoshop techniques like...

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Dan Havlik Posted: Aug 01, 2014 0 comments

There are lots of apps out there for converting your images into classic looking black-and-white shots but few with the pedigree of Macphun’s new Tonality program. Created, in part, by several former members of Nik Software, who were behind the popular Silver Efex Pro black-and-white app, Tonality aims to to take monochrome conversion one step further.

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John Brandon Posted: Jun 28, 2011 Published: May 01, 2011 2 comments
For years, anyone serious about photography has viewed Corel Paint Shop Pro (PSP) as the low cost alternative to Adobe Photoshop. Originally developed by a tiny company in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, Paint Shop has grown up into a full-featured photo workflow tool with a built-in photo organizer that includes tagging options and fast previewing, an advanced image editor, and handy integration with Flickr and Facebook.

For $70, PaintShop Photo Pro X3 Ultimate is a smart addition to a virtual photo toolbox. A few performance problems and some slightly questionable editing capabilities puts PSP in the uncomfortable position of still being in the tall shadow of Adobe. That said, if you want to skip the $700 purchase price, PSP is on the right track.

Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 07, 2014 Published: Jan 01, 2014 0 comments
It all began back in 1990 with a shareware program called Paint Shop. Debuting the same year as Adobe PhotoShop 1.0, comparison to that legendary product has been inescapable. Paint Shop, known as PaintShop Pro X6 Ultimate in its current incarnation, has always been associated with three characteristics: extreme affordability, sufficient power for most photo enthusiasts, and Windows-only compatibility. PaintShop Pro has continued to evolve and improve, and today offers many significant enhancements, including the ability to run smoothly on Macs using a Windows emulation program.
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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments

Corel's KPT Collection Quick Look
· MAC and Windows compatible
· $99.99 -- US

Further Information
COREL'S KPT COLLECTION

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

The idea of loading an image and pushing a button and seeing what happens may be anathema to some photographers, but for certain images where you might want an extra-special touch done easy it might just do the trick.

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David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

Image-editing applications that run on a Windows PC have been available since the early 1990s. In that decade and a half digital photography has grown and changed dramatically, requiring new and different kinds of image-editing support. One of the applications that has been around for most of that time is Paint Shop Pro, now under Corel's ownership. Over the years it has...

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David B. Brooks Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

As PCs evolved from the early to the mid-1990s and more and more had color monitors there was a flurry of interest among application programmers to develop and offer paint programs, mostly to provide computer users with a creative opportunity to make digital art. As color scanners became more available in the consumer market these paint applications were also used to input...

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Howard Millard Posted: Mar 01, 2010 0 comments

For portrait, wedding, landscape, and fine art photographers, Corel’s new Painter 11 excels when you want to emulate traditional art media from your images, including oil paint on canvas, pastels on textured art paper, woodcut, silkscreen, watercolor, and more.

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