Software & Computers

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Ibarionex R. Perello Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

As I walked the trade show floor at the recent PMA, it was interesting to see how much software was being offered to meet specific needs, rather than attempt to be the end-all and be-all. I discovered software that offers solutions not meant to replace Adobe's Photoshop, but rather help photographers improve their ability to achieve common and specific tasks.

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

Most of the software news for 2010 was featured in our March issue, but we have some quick updates to share.

Nik Software is best known for its Photoshop plug-ins. They have expanded beyond this with support for both Apple’s Aperture and Adobe’s Lightroom now in all of their products. One new addition worthy of mention is Viveza 2. If you’re not familiar with...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: May 01, 2009 0 comments

When you browse advertisements for notebook computers, you may be led to believe that the only differences between them are scientific-sounding technical specifications.

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Today's high-resolution digital cameras eat up lots of memory. High-capacity memory cards cost as much as a portable hard drive, so why not use a portable storage device and transfer card memory to that drive? Portable hard drives are battery-driven and most employ a 2.5" disk drive, while a few use the more expensive 1.8" drive. As an alternative there are...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Jan 13, 2012 Published: Dec 01, 2011 10 comments
Like most professional portrait photographers, I use Photoshop every day. Yet, because Adobe Photoshop is such a powerful program with so many tools available, it also comes with a significant learning curve. And when it comes to facial retouching, there are several tasks involved that do not always make Photoshop the best choice for everyone, especially those who want to do the job and move on.
Steve Bedell Posted: Dec 31, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 1 comments
This is the third edition of Portrait Professional I have reviewed so I’ll focus this review on three areas of investigation in Version 11: what can it do, how quickly can it do it, and what’s new. I should note that I am reviewing the Studio 64 version that can handle Raw files and utilize 64-bit versions of Windows 7 or Vista. The Standard version works with JPEG files or 24-bit TIFF files; the Studio version can also work with Raw files but is limited to 48-bit color. The program can be used with Windows XP and up and also Intel Mac OS X 10.5 or later. It acts as both a stand-alone product and as a Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Lightroom, and Aperture plug-in.
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Jon Canfield Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

As the price of wide format photo printers like the ones offered by Epson, Canon, and HP continues to come down, more and more digital photo enthusiasts are adding them to their digital darkrooms. For less than $400, you can now print photo quality 11x14" images (actually, up to 13x19), saving money and time without sending these prints out to a photo lab.

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Phillip Andrews Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

Taking, editing, and enhancing photos are just the first few steps in the imaging process. Many photographers spend lots of time in these phases and then let their carefully crafted pictures sit dormant on their hard drive. These quick tips are designed to help you put your photos on show, whether as prints or on the web. There are multiple ways to share your images, so carry on...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

Just as we view flare as non-image-forming light that detracts from a photograph, we can think of digital noise as non-image-forming picture elements (pixels) that detract from a digital image. We tend to look at digital noise as a nuisance, like bats in the attic. And we want to be rid of the problems as quickly and painlessly as possible while doing the least amount of damage.

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David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

A dozen or so years ago digital cameras were just becoming a reality, although still pricey and limited in utility. Some of these cameras offered output file format choices that usually included JPEG and sometimes TIFF, and rarely raw. You chose the TIFF option as an option to the lossey JPEG. When the raw option was first offered it was in the standard .RAW format that could be...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Mar 01, 2008 1 comments

Shooting JPEG images is similar to shooting color negative film and handing the roll to a photo lab for processing and printing. The results--overall--are generally good. But someone else is making decisions about sharpness, white balance, saturation, and other vital parameters that determine how the final image looks. In the case of digital cameras, a group of engineers...

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Philip Andrews Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

Remember the Polaroid? You push the button and the print is ejected and developed right before your eyes. But rather than settle for these "straight" prints, for many years professional image-makers used the unique features of this technology to create wonderfully textured images as well. The process involved transferring the image from the original to damp watercolor...

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Phillip Andrews Posted: May 01, 2008 1 comments

Remember the Polaroid? You push the button and the print is ejected and developed right before your eyes. But rather than settle for these "straight" prints, for many years professional image-makers used the unique features of this technology to create wonderfully textured images as well. The process involved transferring the image from the original to damp watercolor...

C.A. Boylan Posted: Jul 18, 2014 0 comments
Tamron recently added the SP 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD (A011 for Nikon mount) and the 16-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD macro (B016 for Canon and Nikon mount) to the lens profile for aberration correction offered for Adobe’s Photoshop CC, Camera Raw and Lightroom 5. The lens profile will be bundled with the Camera Raw 8.5 update and Lightroom 5.5. Customers who use these lenses will be able to utilize the software for easy correction of lens distortion, chromatic aberration and peripheral light fall-off based on design data.
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Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Sep 01, 2002 0 comments

Anytime Adobe releases a new version of Photoshop there are a host of opinions expressed about this universal graphics and photo image-editing and manipulation program. Since Photoshop affects so many personal and professional lives, we asked the opinion of seven acknowledged Photoshop experts on a...

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