Software & Computers

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David B. Brooks Posted: Dec 01, 2006 0 comments

With a digital camera, a computer, and a printer, all that remains to make photo prints is an application that will access and open your photo files and send the images to the printer. That's simple enough. But there are obviously other issues--what about color matching between screen and print? How do you get to the pictures you want printed? There are also questions...

David B. Brooks Posted: Dec 27, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments
LG Electronics is the first to offer a new pro-graphics LCD display with LED backlighting. It also has the wide Adobe RGB color width, and will adjust to the lower 80.0 CD/m2 white luminance to provide color-managed printing brightness. The new display is optimized for Microsoft Windows with WQHD 2560x1440 resolution and multitasking windows, “dependent on content, device, interface and/or graphics card,” according to LG. The 27” diagonal size has a base physical resolution of 1920x1080 pixel resolution that may be doubled by the software driver with some PC systems running Windows.
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Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

I’ve used LucisArt 2 for years to enhance detail and discover information in my image files; indeed, every pro I know has LucisArt and uses it to either sharpen detail or create amazing effects. But the basic LucisArt platform now seems crude compared to the latest, more sophisticated version. The older, basic version had several effects that you could choose from and a small window that...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments

Further Information
MAGIX PhotoStory 2004
http://www.magix.com

You can't turn around these days without bumping into a software...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

You read the headline right--that new, off-the-shelf computer you just bought is colorblind! Even though your computer sends RGB color information to its display so colors will appear on the screen, the computer does not know what colors its user is seeing. That seems like a contradiction, unless you realize that personal computing hardware and software grew like topsy...

Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 01, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 3 comments
The most recent speed gains have been in SD format cards, making us wonder about the larger CF card. But that concern has been to an extent dispelled by some of the recent developments in this very fast-changing field. One of the newest developments unveiled at the show was a card that sits between those two sizes, the XQD card. The first camera to accept the new memory card is the Nikon D4, although the D4 also features a CF slot.

XQD has a smaller form factor than CF, so they’re not interchangeable. Sony, the company that introduced the world’s first XQD card, notes that you can record up to 100 Raw image frames from continuous shooting mode using the card and obtain 125MB/sec read/write speed when using a PCIe port; new XQD card readers are available as well. The casing around the card is “robust,” with contact pins inside the casing itself, which Nikon says helps eliminate problems in the field.

Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

The big news is the availability of the new standard in Secure Digital (SD) memory—SDXC. SDXC is currently supported by only a small number of cameras, like the Panasonic GH1 (not surprising given that Panasonic is one of the main proponents of the new memory format). The cards look physically the same as SD and SDHC cards, but they have a new format that promises large data storage...

Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

If there's anything you can count on with digital products, it's faster speeds, higher capacities, and lower costs. Nowhere is this truer than with memory cards. There was plenty of news from a variety of vendors.

SanDisk doubled the capacity of several of their most popular cards, including the Extreme III line of cards to 8GB in CompactFlash, and 2GB...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

Someday an innovative manufacturer will market a memory card that changes color as it fills with images, then changes back again when it’s downloaded. Such a feature would make it easier to determine which cards are ready for formatting. That wouldn’t stop us from accidentally deleting a keeper now and again, but it might help us steer clear of total calamity. However, until...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 1999 0 comments

The early rumors were pitting microsoft's new, yet to be announced application against Photoshop. How wrong the pundits were. Microsoft's new PhotoDraw 2000 is a quite different approach to a graphics and photo application because Microsoft...

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John Brandon Posted: Jun 01, 2009 4 comments

Microsoft’s Expression Media 2, flexibility is the key feature—it lets you avoid a predetermined workflow where you follow the same path each time you manage photos.

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John Brandon Posted: May 01, 2009 0 comments

In photography, tracking the location of a shoot is almost as important as the shoot itself.

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David B. Brooks Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

Since it was first begun as project "Longhorn" in 2005, a lot of experts, gurus, and techno-pundits, as well as Microsoft official representatives, have written reams about Vista. But until its release in mid-February, no one in digital photography or color management has had a word to say publicly about how Windows Vista will impact digital photography with a PC...

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Howard Millard Posted: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

Say the words "color management" and some digital photographers and printers break into a sweat. Others swear that what they don't know can't hurt them. But most believe that taking control of color management is essential to a...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Mar 28, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 1 comments
Digital black and white has probably never been more popular than it is today. All of the major editing programs like Adobe’s Photoshop and Lightroom and Apple’s Aperture support black-and-white conversions natively, and at a much higher quality than just a few years ago. While all of these programs can do black and white you can take your monochrome imagery to the next level with plug-ins, specific task programs that use the architecture of the main program to get the work done. These plug-ins (which may be available as “stand-alones” as well) produce some amazing work, letting you emulate various film types, grain patterns, and more, usually working with “presets” (image looks) that can be modified with ease to customize every image. Combined with the improved output from recent inkjet printers, there has never been a better time to explore digital black and white than today.

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