Software & Computers

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John Brandon Posted: Mar 12, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 4 comments
Adobe Photoshop Elements 10 caters to the entry-level crowd, but is imbued with several professional-level tools. Even when a feature is not really intended for serious photographers, there is a goldmine of functionality that could save countless hours. The app is celebrating 10 years on the market. Adobe has slowly revised the workflow, and it’s getting much better.

In this version, you’ll first see a start-up screen with two buttons, one for organizing photos and one for editing. It makes more sense to click the button to organize images first, especially if you’re not even sure which images need editing.

When you do, one of the first prompts you’ll see asks how you normally import photos. That’s handy, because even the most experienced pro has to get photos off the camera somehow. You might typically load images onto a network drive, or prefer loading directly off the camera. (An option to scan images seems woefully dated these days.) Whatever option you choose, you can always go back and select a different import default. For now, it just means, when you start Elements 10, the app will automatically look for that specific source.

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David B. Brooks Posted: Dec 01, 2002 0 comments

Adobe Photoshop Elements 2.0

When Adobe Photoshop Elements was first released I was very favorable to what it would do for the digital darkroom user, and found very few weaknesses. Considering that the price of Elements Version...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Aug 09, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 2 comments

Mention digital image editing and it’s likely that the first word you’ll hear is Photoshop. It’s become a general term, like Xerox. For many, the full-blown version of Photoshop (currently at CS5) is either overkill, with features that you’ll never need or use, or just too expensive. Adobe realizes this and has produced a more streamlined version for years. This “entry-level” version of Photoshop, named Elements, is priced like a basic editing program, but filled with features you’d expect to pay quite a bit more for. The latest version, Elements 9 has added several new features that photographers have been requesting for years, making this release an even more attractive option, and further blurring the line between CS and Elements features.

What’s New
There are normally a couple of new features in each release that make upgrading an attractive option for current users, and in this regard Elements 9 adds some interesting items in the sharing area, and a major feature that has been requested for years. Let’s take a look at what is new in Version 9.

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David B. Brooks Posted: May 01, 2001 0 comments

It was just a matter of time before Adobe would fill the gap between PhotoDeluxe and the full version of Photoshop. The increasing rate of sales of digital cameras was the signal to Adobe that it was time for Adobe Photoshop Elements. The only surprise to me was the estimated street price of...

Dan Havlik Posted: Nov 19, 2014 0 comments

Adobe has just announced that final releases of Lightroom 5.7 and Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) 8.7 are now available. These updates offer several key features including a new tool to import files from Apple’s now defunct Aperture professional software, and from its current iPhoto consumer imaging software to Ligthroom.

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Oct 06, 2014 0 comments

Adobe has announced an update to Photoshop CC that adds new features including changes to the Creative Cloud service; improvements to some existing features; and various other refinements. Key among those additions are updates to 13 Photoshop CC desktop tools that link to a new family of integrated mobile apps; Touch support for Windows 8 and Surface Pro 3; the Creative Profile (that connects CC desktop tools); and nine new mobile apps.

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David B. Brooks Posted: Nov 01, 2005 0 comments

In their own language, Adobe claims that Creative Suite is the "powerhouse design environment that revolutionized print and web workflows for creative professionals worldwide." The words that define how Adobe relates their Creative Suite to users is "creative professionals." We can safely assume Adobe is primarily referring to all those who work...

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John Brandon Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

What if you could take a physical light box—like that ancient cabinet model you once used for viewing slides—and put it inside your computer?

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Joe Farace Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

Call It Photoshop 9 If You Must
OK, go on and say it: Stop the madness! You haven't even upgraded from Photoshop 7 or just started on CS and along comes Adobe's Photoshop CS2 a.k.a. Space Monkey. As before, there are CS2 versions of all of Adobe's other graphic applications including InDesign, Illustrator, and GoLive. This is also the last...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

Adobe's rationale for releasing a beta version of their next Photoshop CS3 to the public, at least those who are CS2 licensed users, is that they wanted to give support to Apple users with new Intel processor Macs. This would allow those users to have Photoshop running "native" instead of in emulation mode sooner than later. While this does lend support to...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

Now on Version 11, it’s hard to imagine that Photoshop can continue to make large changes. It seems that just about everything but the kitchen sink is already in the application, but once again Adobe has found ways to take a mature application and improve it. In this overview, I’ll give you a first look at the new features you’ll find in CS4.

First up, and a...

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John Brandon Posted: Sep 01, 2010 0 comments

If a computer is part of your photographic workflow, then you’re probably already using Adobe’s Photoshop. The program has become standard for serious pros, erstwhile amateurs, and even those who just want to add some flair to their Facebook profile.

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David B. Brooks Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

Is a new upgrade on software merely an excuse for a new revenue stream for companies? One could take that somewhat cynical view, but on the other hand I wonder if it is any different than any new model of a product that is made attractive by new and improved features. When we trade a still running car in for a new model we expect it will have better performance and new...

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

Product cycles being what they are, it seemed to me that it was about time for another iteration of Adobe's Photoshop Elements a.k.a Photoshop for the less well-heeled, and so here it is. In Version 3.0, Adobe gave up on trying to make Elements look like Photoshop and that was a big step forward. In this latest version they've built upon that improved interface to make...

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 01, 2006 0 comments

Each new version of Adobe's Photoshop Elements gets better than the previous one. That's the case with this inexpensive ($99) program that has evolved from Adobe's stepchild to a darn good imaging program for the money. The interface of the latest version for Microsoft Windows even contains hints of Adobe's as-yet-released Lightroom in its design...

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