Software & Computers

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David B. Brooks Posted: May 10, 2012 Published: Apr 01, 2012 48 comments
I usually do not write reports on new computers, but the new 2011 Apple Mac mini (www.apple.com) is an exception. It is not because it has the fastest CPU, as that is not a major advantage for working with digital photographs. In fact, doing digital photographic editing does not involve much computation (“compute” is to calculate or reckon a figure or amount) and no calculation is needed to edit an image with Photoshop. When an image editor opens a digital photographic file, the entire image, every pixel, is put into RAM memory.
Edited by George Schaub Posted: Sep 18, 2012 Published: Aug 01, 2012 10 comments
Every year the Technical Image Press Association (TIPA), a worldwide association of photo and imaging magazine editors, meets to pick the Best of Class in a wide range of photo categories. As the sole US member of the association, Shutterbug joins editors from Europe, Asia, and Africa in the nominating, judging, and selection process. One of the most exciting aspects of photography today is the constant advancement of technology and design, and this year’s Top Products reflect that spirit and those accomplishments, including new categories of Video D-SLR and Mobile App. Editor George Schaub joins all fellow TIPA members in congratulating those selected to receive the prestigious TIPA award. (To learn more about TIPA, please visit the website at: www.tipa.com.)
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John Townley Posted: Jan 01, 2004 2 comments

What if you had to make an exciting movie but the one thing you wasn't able to do was actually film it? Dialog, music, OK--but no footage. None. That's something the likes of historical film director Ken Burns has had to do many times in...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments

3D-Album Commercial Suite Quick Look
· MAC and Windows compatible
· $299 -- US

Further Information
3D-ALBUM COMMERCIAL SUITE
http://www.3d-album.com...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2004 0 comments

One of the few problems with digital image capture is you tend to shoot more photographs than you otherwise might if you had to pay for all that film and processing. Oh sure, I know that nobody's giving away CompactFlash or SD/MMC cards, but as the cost per MB for media continues to drop, we tend to...

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Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Joe Farace, All Rights Reserved

One of the few problems with digital image capture is you tend to shoot more photographs than if you had to pay for processing them. (You really have to pay for all these extra images--there is no free digital lunch--but that's a topic for another story.) If you're gonna shoot lots of pictures...

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Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

ACDSee has always been a powerful image management tool for Microsoft Windows users, and the latest version is no exception, but sometimes you need a little more power. That's when you need to kick it up a notch and spend a few extra bucks for the PowerPack edition. ACDSee PowerPack costs...

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John Brandon Posted: Mar 01, 2010 0 comments

For the pro photographer, there are two possible scenarios in managing a photographic workflow. One is the scattershot method, the second approach features a clear organizational method.

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John Brandon Posted: Jul 05, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 11 comments
With each successive release of ACDSee Pro, the photo management suite adds ever-more-powerful features. In this review I hope to help you decide whether or not its features match up with your own workflow, meet your needs, or even improve on existing features to enhance your photographic creations.

In my own workflow, the new version, ACDSee Pro 5, smoothed over a few rough edges in the editing process and made my management chores a bit less time-consuming. The release is not so groundbreaking that it might make you consider abandoning Adobe Lightroom or Apple Aperture altogether, but there are some pro-level additions that are definitely worth considering. The program never crashed and operated quickly for just about any task on a standard desktop PC. Note I said PC—there is no Mac version available or considered at this point.

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David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

Instead of the usual numerical version increase for Photoshop, this latest edition is named Adobe Photoshop CS (Creative Suite). This identifies this version as part of a larger upgrade of most of Adobe's graphics applications, including--in...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 2001 0 comments

Probably the one computer product most closely associated with photography is Adobe's Photoshop. Adobe releases a major upgrade of Photoshop every so often that incorporates improvements the company's programmers have developed since...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Aug 01, 2003 0 comments

Adobe Photoshop Camera Raw Plug-In

Just a few years ago, when the digital camera was just beginning to catch on, image media storage capacity was very limited and expensive. To conserve this small capacity cameras were designed to...

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John Brandon Posted: Mar 12, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 4 comments
Adobe Photoshop Elements 10 caters to the entry-level crowd, but is imbued with several professional-level tools. Even when a feature is not really intended for serious photographers, there is a goldmine of functionality that could save countless hours. The app is celebrating 10 years on the market. Adobe has slowly revised the workflow, and it’s getting much better.

In this version, you’ll first see a start-up screen with two buttons, one for organizing photos and one for editing. It makes more sense to click the button to organize images first, especially if you’re not even sure which images need editing.

When you do, one of the first prompts you’ll see asks how you normally import photos. That’s handy, because even the most experienced pro has to get photos off the camera somehow. You might typically load images onto a network drive, or prefer loading directly off the camera. (An option to scan images seems woefully dated these days.) Whatever option you choose, you can always go back and select a different import default. For now, it just means, when you start Elements 10, the app will automatically look for that specific source.

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David B. Brooks Posted: Dec 01, 2002 0 comments

Adobe Photoshop Elements 2.0

When Adobe Photoshop Elements was first released I was very favorable to what it would do for the digital darkroom user, and found very few weaknesses. Considering that the price of Elements Version...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Aug 09, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 2 comments

Mention digital image editing and it’s likely that the first word you’ll hear is Photoshop. It’s become a general term, like Xerox. For many, the full-blown version of Photoshop (currently at CS5) is either overkill, with features that you’ll never need or use, or just too expensive. Adobe realizes this and has produced a more streamlined version for years. This “entry-level” version of Photoshop, named Elements, is priced like a basic editing program, but filled with features you’d expect to pay quite a bit more for. The latest version, Elements 9 has added several new features that photographers have been requesting for years, making this release an even more attractive option, and further blurring the line between CS and Elements features.

What’s New
There are normally a couple of new features in each release that make upgrading an attractive option for current users, and in this regard Elements 9 adds some interesting items in the sharing area, and a major feature that has been requested for years. Let’s take a look at what is new in Version 9.

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