Digital Darkroom

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Aug 01, 2002 0 comments

When taking a picture of an
object, the exact background is no longer as important as it once was
because we can now change it so easily in Photoshop. For example, #1 is
a picture I recently took of a vase that I was preparing to offer...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

There are many different ways to make selections, each making life easier depending on the image and areas you want to define. Here's how I make selections that involve a lot of straight lines:

This picture, taken indoors looking out through large windows is a prime example of backlighting causing underexposure (#1). The fix for it is to select the well-lit outdoor...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Mar 01, 1999 0 comments

Remember the old days when retouching eyeglass glare meant sending the image out to a retouching artist or, if you did it yourself, spending about an hour or more with wet dyes carefully blending colors and carefully adding dye in thin layers to gradually...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Sep 01, 2003 0 comments

As some of you may already know, when you install Photoshop not all of the application is immediately loaded. There are many features and options that require further attention to become accessible. Photoshop "Styles" is one of those...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Jan 01, 2004 0 comments

When I read this press release headline, "Canon launches world's first film scanning capable, bus-powered 2400x4800dpi CIS scanner," I was intrigued. Then learning that the CanoScan LiDE 80 also features 48-bit color depth, only requires...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

I am frequently asked how to cut people out of one picture and paste them into another. All such work is preceded by first making a "selection" of the area that you want to cut out. Selections can be made many different ways. And, to some degree, the method you choose usually has to do with the nature of the material or people who you want to select.
With...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Mar 01, 2003 0 comments

In color photography there are six photographic colors (red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, and yellow) plus density and contrast. In order to look at a print and correctly identify what might be wrong with the color balance it is necessary...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: May 01, 2004 0 comments

Of all the new tools in Photoshop CS, the one that I have heard the least about is the Shadow/Highlight tool. And, yet, for photographers, it is an extremely useful tool. Think of it as an alternate method for the Curves tool, one that often gives people...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: May 01, 1999 0 comments

I've worked in a conventional,
wet darkroom almost all of my life. I can remember see-sawing black
and white film back and forth through open trays to develop it when
I was about 10 years old. I've beenthere...

Howard Millard Posted: Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

Mysterious, evocative, otherworldly--these are all terms that describe the powerful emotional and visual responses to black and white infrared (IR) photography. For landscapes, this approach yields striking, contrasty images where healthy green foliage, which strongly reflects IR radiation, appears to glow in snowy white tones, while blue skies and water darken dramatically.

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Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

In this article I'm going to show you how combining two software programs and one plug-in can make your life easier and your workflow faster. As a bonus (see sidebar), I'm going to show you a way to handle dodging and burning that is nondestructive to your files. First up, we've got a family portrait with 16 people to retouch. That sounds like an hour's...

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Uwe Steinmueller Posted: Aug 01, 2003 0 comments

The Raw Deal

The most common image format use these days with digital cameras is the JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) format. The obvious limitation of JPEG is that it is most often used for its excellent but lossy compression format...

Joe Farace Posted: Aug 01, 2000 0 comments

People have been fascinated with panoramic imagery ever since the beginning of photography, but my own fascination can be traced back to Bausch & Lomb's invention of CinemaScope lenses for the movies during the 1950s. The first CinemaScope movie, The...

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Tony Sweet Posted: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments

Warming Effect
The filter that I use the most, by far, is the warming filter. It is used primarily in overcast light or in shade to remove the inherent blue or cold light from such scenes. As a result, an amber or warm tonality is added to the scene.

Here is...

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