Outdoor/Travel

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Clint Farlinger Posted: May 01, 2004 0 comments

As I slipped and fell helplessly to the ground for the 102nd time that afternoon (give or take a fall or two), I decided not to get up again. Despite the fact we were still a good half-mile from the trail leading...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Aug 01, 2001 0 comments

I live on the East Coast, and I mean right on it. My studio is located about 8 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. People who live here love the beach, and of course the tourists who descend like swarming flies on a slain wildebeest every...

Maynard Switzer Posted: Aug 29, 2013 Published: Jul 01, 2013 1 comments
For almost a year I planned for the 22-day trip I took this past January to photograph among the indigenous people of Ethiopia. I did a lot of research so I’d know what to expect and how to deal with everything from the customs of the country to the weather and the traveling conditions. Also, I’d have a driver and a guide, and along the way I’d pick up local guides who’d know the ins and outs of specific villages, tribes, and dialects.
Maynard Switzer Posted: Aug 27, 2012 Published: Jul 01, 2012 2 comments
Often people will ask me, “How do you get that great color in your photos?” I appreciate the compliment, but it’s usually followed by, “You must do a lot of retouching.” Actually I don’t. I will do a little color enhancement, but how color looks in my images has to do partly with how I set certain camera controls, how I control or use lighting in the scene, and how I compose the photograph.
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Maynard Switzer Posted: Apr 30, 2013 Published: Mar 01, 2013 0 comments
Every traveler with a camera will welcome the words “smaller” and “lighter.” Because I travel and photograph for a living, I not only welcome them, I search for them. I want to see those adjectives accompanying nouns like camera, lens, laptop, and drive (the portable kind).
Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2005 0 comments

When hiking or traveling with my SLR system, whether 35mm or digital, I prefer hand holding the camera to shoot nature and scenic views. Yet the value of a tripod is not lost on me, especially when confronted with the relatively long exposures required to capture a gracefully cascading waterfall or the warm glow of a sunset, or when employing a long lens with wildlife (especially...

Maynard Switzer Posted: Mar 01, 2010 0 comments

One of the things I always try to do when I’m planning a trip is check out the events calendars of the cities and towns I’ll be visiting to see what sort of festivals might be taking place. Sometimes I’ll even rearrange my schedule to make sure I hit those places at the right time; that’s how important it is for me to take advantage of these photo opportunities. Images of...

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Maynard Switzer Posted: May 01, 2010 0 comments

This may surprise you, but I prefer to travel with single focal length lenses rather than zooms.

I have several reasons. First, my primes are usually one to two stops faster than zooms, which is important not so much because I shoot with my lenses wide-open but rather because the extra one or two stops of speed makes the image brighter in the viewfinder—which means...

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Maynard Switzer Posted: Jul 01, 2010 0 comments

Travel photographers call them fixers, and that’s what they do: they fix things to make sure the way is smooth so the photographer can do what he needs to do—get pictures that the average tourist can’t. And if you want those kinds of opportunities—in other words, if you’re really serious about your travel photography—there’s no substitute for a savvy...

Maynard Switzer Posted: Jan 01, 2010 0 comments

My route to travel photography was not direct, but looking back, I realize the direction was set fairly early.

While attending the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, I got a chance to spend a semester break photographing in Arkansas at the oldest bluegrass festival in the US. I never forgot how much I’d enjoyed photographing the festival and the local...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Here are a few things AJ Neste's learned about photographing surfers:
One, it's the singer, not the song. "The most important part of being successful at this," he says, "is knowing the surfer. It's not just showing up somewhere and taking photos of random surfers. You won't know their personal style."

...

Brad Perks Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Rainbows have inspired legends of luck and good fortune. The beautiful colors are created in a simple process. Capturing a rainbow with your camera takes a bit of that good luck.

Rainbows require two simple ingredients--sunlight and raindrops. They combine at just the right angle to colonize a beautiful picture. The colors are formed when...

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Jack Hollingsworth Posted: Feb 01, 2006 0 comments

Here's an e-mail I sent to a friend at the end of June last year:

"Hey, man, I just returned from Prague with some pretty cool pictures--all lifestyle shots of models. I went with no planning, no preproduction, no shot list, no schedule. And no earthly idea of what I'd come back with. It was three days of me, my camera, a local...

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Dave Frieder Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

When I started my Bridge Project back in 1993 I had no idea how I would really begin to climb and photograph the 15-20 New York City bridges that I would need to complete it. It all started when I saw some fantastic images that John Sexton and Ron Wisner took from the top of the Golden Gate Bridge. I said to myself, where are there huge and more bridges than anywhere in the...

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Art Rosch Posted: Aug 01, 2010 0 comments

My wife and I live in an alternate universe. It’s called “RV Land.” We inhabit a vibrant subculture in which people live full-time in various types of recreational vehicles. An RV is a little home on wheels, able to carry computers and camera gear along with a full life support system. It requires a diet of gasoline but the expense seems trivial as we pass hundreds of motels...

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