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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

If you've ever been walking down the street and a picture caught your
eye, but had no camera to capture the moment, then the small, shirt-pocket size
digicams might just be item you're seeking. A number of companies, including
Pentax, Casio and Minolta have already introduced such models, each with their
own unique feature sets. Now, Contax, a name renowned for exquisite cameras
and excellent lenses, has jumped into the fray with their own version, the U4R,
a 4-megapixel camera sporting a Carl Zeiss Vario-Tessar T* lens. Those familiar
with the amazing image clarity of this line of lenses will immediately recognize
the name; those unfamiliar with it can be assured that it is a legendary name
in optics. The camera has just under a 3x optical zoom lens, delivering the
equivalent of 38-115mm in 35mm format. There's also a digital zoom if
you need it, delivering over 400mm, but as with many digital zooms it's
really a crop into the frame, and will not deliver the quality of the prime


Lynne Eodice Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

When you view a smooth, shiny surface from the proper angle--such as glass, metal or water--you'll see a reflected image. These reflections provide you with a great opportunity to add interest to a photo by showing two different aspects of the environment at the same time. Since the reflected portion of the image is almost always distorted, it often lends a surreal...

Lynne Eodice Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Robert Farber is renowned for his painterly images. Throughout the years, he's carved a niche with his romantic, illustrative approach to photographing nudes, landscapes and a variety of other subjects that have been featured in books like By The Sea and Farber Nudes.


He's continued this tradition with a new book, entitled American Mood...

Lynne Eodice Posted: Feb 01, 2005 9 comments

SKPA (Special Kids Photography of America) is a non-profit organization that was born from Heidi Lewis' frustration in trying to get a professional portrait taken of her one-year-old son, Taylor, who has a connective tissue disorder.


Lewis is not alone. According to her mother, Karen Dórame, who co-founded SKPA with Lewis...

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Howard Millard Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Want to add a new dimension to your photography? Try shooting panoramic pictures--shoot a series of two or more frames and then combine them digitally. The wide sweep of the panoramic format captures attention, adds impact, and compels viewers to...

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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

"Digital imaging is not about pixels, it's about pictures..."--interview on

What makes us photographers? Is it an urge to capture that elusive "decisive moment," to freeze a point in time forever, or just to record history as it unfolds in front of our lenses? This month you'll take a journey with a few...

Omar Attum Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Omar Attum, All Rights Reserved

Wide angle lenses are my favorite types of lenses. They allow me to create striking 3D-like compositions, provide more depth of field, and fit more in the photograph, even in confined spaces. Although I regularly use a digital SLR, I often feel limited in using my Canon EOS 10D for landscape photographs because of the...

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

How many times a day do we walk past those things that usually do not draw our attention? Many times they are the ordinary, the simplistic, and the dime a dozen, that we let go unnoticed. Not so for the passionate photographer.

I am amazed how I can be so focused on those objects that everyone misses. Before I gained an interest in photography, I...

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Jay McCabe Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Andrew Nosé
Saratoga High School
Saratoga, California

Early Days

All Photos © 2004 Brent Nosé, All Rights Reserved

Andrew might be the youngest student we've ever featured in this column. The photos here were taken while he was a student at Hillbrook School in Los Gatos, California, a...

Howard Millard Posted: Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

Does it seem that your hard drive is filling up with digital image files faster than the speed of light? Where in the world is that shot you took last summer of Steve water-skiing, and whatever happened to those great photos from the trip to Death Valley that you want to e-mail to a friend? Whether your digital pictures are from a digital camera, scans from prints, negatives, or...