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George Schaub Posted: Oct 05, 2005 0 comments

Willard (Bill) Clark, a photo industry icon and the former executive director
of Photoimaging Manufacturers & Distributors Association (PMDA), died on Sept.
24. He was 77 years old. Cause of death was cancer.



Mr. Clark was associated with the photo industry for more than 40 years primarily
in consumer and trade journalism, both as a writer and photographer, and more
recently with PMDA. He worked with the senior executives of virtually every firm
in the photo industry, serving as confidant and advisor to many and earning the
respect of all.



Mr. Clark came to New York as a photographer for United Press after working for
a small Ohio newspaper as a reporter and photographer. His equipment in those
days was a 4x5 Speed Graphic, standard issue for a news journalist at that time
but now seen only in photo museums and period movies. In 1954 he became associate
editor of U.S. Camera magazine and then founding editor of Camera 35 magazine.
"I was a staff of one," he once said. He subsequently was appointed
editor.



After a variety of other magazine publishing positions, Mr. Clark came back to
the photo industry in 1981 as editor and associate publisher of Photo Weekly Magazine,
which evolved into Photo Business Magazine. His final publishing stint was a short
one as editor of PTN.



Mr. Clark retired from his position as PMDA executive director earlier this year.



At the time of his retirement, some industry associates paid tribute to him. Stacie
Errera, chief marketing officer for Tamron USA, Inc., and current president of
PMDA, said, "Bill always acted as a professional and was liked by everyone.
Everything Bill did was in the best interest of the organization."



Dan Unger, Agfa's director of marketing and PMDA board member, said of Bill:
"He was an easy-going guy who did everything right."



Mr. Clark is succeeded by two sons, Paul, Ashland, OR, and Bruce, Hopewell, NJ,
both attorneys, and two granddaughters, Fiona, 3 ½ and Emmeline, 1. He
was pre-deceased by his wife, Olga.



Editor's Note: The notes on Bill's life were kindly
provided by Jerry Lansky. I knew Bill for almost twenty years and he was always
a class act, with a kind word and encouragement for all. His "How are you
doin', man!" greeting will always echo in my ears. Those fortunate
enough to have known and worked with him understand that he was a great contributor
to photography and the photo industry and a genuinely good soul. I will miss him
greatly.

--George Schaub ...

Filed under
Shutterbug Staff Posted: Oct 04, 2005 0 comments

Lexar Media, Inc. (Nasdaq: LEXR), has announced its LockTight CompactFlash security
system. It is described as an essential solution for digital photographers who
want to protect their stored digital images and information. Photographers working
in highly sensitive and vulnerable areas who require added security can leverage
the LockTight system for card level security to limit unauthorized access to
data and material stored on the card.

...

Lynne Eodice Posted: Oct 01, 2005 1 comments

Children are among the most appealing photo subjects, because of their seemingly limitless energy and cute expressions. Their playfulness and spontaneity is a joy to record. Some are bold and will clown around for your camera, but you can capture great images of a bashful child as well. Whether you're photographing your own children or those of a friend or relative, there...

Lynne Eodice Posted: Oct 01, 2005 1 comments

About Lynne...
Lynne Eodice is an accomplished writer/photographer and a popular contributor to Photographic magazine.

 

This event began in 1972 when a man named Sid Cutter helped organize a balloon festival to celebrate the 50th anniversary of a local radio station. About a dozen hot-air balloons were launched from a parking lot in an Albuquerque...

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

"I shall not today attempt further to define the kinds of material I understand to be embraced within that shorthand description; and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know it when I see it."--Justice Potter Stewart

When the company my wife works for got new computers, I decided to see how my website (

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2005 2 comments

There's an old photographer's joke that goes: "If God invented light, then the devil invented fluorescent light." How times do change. With digital capture, fluorescent light can be your friend and I don't mean those long tubes hanging in lighting fixtures from the ceiling. I'm talking about a new breed of portrait lighting tools designed...

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Painted Rainbow
When we first arrived, I was somewhat disappointed that the brilliant colors of Arizona's Painted Desert were muted under gray, rainy skies. Then, as my wife and I came around a bend in the road, a window opened in the clouds, allowing the sunlight to produce this fleeting glimpse of a pot of gold. The rainbow lasted only a few...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Studio lighting often carries with it the stigma of high cost and high demands (on electricity and learning curve), but that is not necessarily the case. Studio lighting is only as complicated as you make it. You can buy an inexpensive set of lights that will do all you need, with a short learning curve, without fear of shorting circuits around the house. Augment these lights with...

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Jay McCabe Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Erik Jacobs
Western Kentucky University
Bowling Green, Kentucky

Inspired Choice
Erik Jacobs didn't take a direct route to photography as a career. When he graduates in December from WKU with a degree in photojournalism, it will be his second diploma--he has a degree in exercise physiology and sports...

Steve Bedell Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

I'm not really fussy about my lights. By that, I mean I'm not enamored by a specific brand and I don't need them to measure light in hundredths of a stop. I also don't need them to cycle in half a second. If I were a fashion or commercial photographer, things might be different, but as a portrait guy, my needs are pretty simple.

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