LATEST ADDITIONS

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Monte Zucker Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

It used to be that you bought black and white film, exposed it, took it into the darkroom and spent days upon days selecting the right paper, developer, time, and temperature. Not anymore...at least, not for me! I'm shooting with my Canon EOS 10D and EOS-1Ds cameras and changing color...

Roger W. Hicks Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Maco is not a name that is particularly familiar to most zphotographers--and those who do know the name are inclined to say "great products, shame about the documentation." Examples of the shortcomings of the latter are easy to find. For example, the same film-developer...

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Ben Clay/Web Photo School Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Most studio photographers would agree that lighting and photographing highly reflective objects can be extremely challenging, particularly curved objects like this turtle that mirror everything in the room. Since your lights will show...

Frances E. Schultz Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Dateline 1940: "The fastest film in the world is the new Tri-X, with twice the speed of Super-XX." If you want the numbers, the British Journal of Photography Almanac for 1940 (actually written in 1939) reckoned it was 7000 H&D.

That's right. Tri-X was...

Roger W. Hicks Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

This article was very nearly called "9600," which is what you get if you multiply 24 by 400. Twenty-four films, that is, times ISO 400. There are at least this many, though half a dozen or so aren't available in the US. Even 18 films is however a pretty impressive number for a...

Robert E. Mayer Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Here is a quick tip list
on letters for the HELP! desk:

Please confine yourself to only one question per letter. Both postal
letters and e-mails are fine, although we prefer e-mail as the most
efficientfo...

George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Overexposure has always been the bane of photographers, be they the film or digital variety. If using negative film, moderate overexposure could be easily handled when printing. But overexpose a slide film and colors, details, and especially bright areas would become washed out, with subsequent...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

This website, Jack Neal offers this observation by the noted photographer Duane Michals: "I think photographs should be provocative and not tell you what you already know. It takes no great powers or magic to reproduce somebody's face in a...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Editor's Notes

As this issue is dedicated to digital photography I thought it would be a good time to share some thoughts on where we stand in the midst of this incredible change that has taken place in photography over the past 10 or so years. These days, it seems like if you support film...

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Joe Farace Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Last month, this column was about software; this month the focus is on hardware. I'm writing this on a Boeing 777 as it flies across the Pacific Ocean toward Japan and will complete it on the way back. In between I'll visit representatives of...

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