Twilight Time

Our Picture This! assignment this month was Twilight Time, the moments when the light of the rising or setting sun creates a magical light that is the delight of all photographers. Readers sent in a preponderance of nature and scenic images and each shows the beauty that only natural (and directional) light can deliver.

Please read this: As this was the first online submission procedure for submitting images to Picture This! we anticipated some technical difficulties (sound familiar?). Here are some matters that came up and suggestions to solve them: 1) Uploads are best done at 4MB JPEG, highest quality. We received some images at too small a file size for us to guarantee good reproduction quality. 2) Please include your name (not user name) and technical notes in the description box. This includes camera, lens, exposure, etc.

Thanks and we are very pleased with the great response this method of submitting images has generated and encourage you to view and comment on your fellow readers’ work.

Banff National Park
Michael Schuerman captured this gorgeous light and scene near Mt. Rundle aside First Vermilion Lake in Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada. Exposure with a Nikon D800 and a 24mm f/1.4 lens with a B+W ND 3.0 10-stop neutral density filter was 90 seconds at f/16.
© Michael Schuerman

Sunset Toast
William Carson made this photo from one of the many docks on Tampa Bay. Exposure with a Nikon D90 and a Nikkor 10-24mm lens (at 10mm) was 1/160 sec at f/6.3.
© William Carson

Abandoned Under Twilight
Seth Riskin created this “light painted” image with a 30-second exposure at f/2.2 and ISO 1600. It was made with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II with a 35mm lens.
© Seth Riskin

Yellowstone
John Compton made this photo in the Porcelain Basin area at Yellowstone National Park. He worked with a Nikon D7100 and an 18-105mm lens and an exposure of f/5.6 at 1/125 sec at ISO 400. He wrote: “The steam from the hot springs was backlit by sky light while the color of the near pond comes from the reflection of the sunset and the clouds.”
© John Compton

Parsnips In Wind Storm
Frank LeBlanc made this evocative image near Bishop, California, with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II and an EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM lens. He mounted his rig onto a Really Right Stuff tripod and a BH-40 ball head. Exposure through a Singh-Ray three-stop ND filter at ISO 50 was f/22 at 6 seconds. He wrote: “My idea in using the ND filter and ISO 50 was to slow down the river as much as possible to catch a good blur while also capturing the reflections of the reeds and flowers. The Sierra can be seen way in the background, barely visible, with a pink glow above.”
© Frank LeBlanc

Ranch Scene, Florida
Lorenzo Cassina wrote: “Driving south on US 27 I witnessed this stunning sunset getting brighter with stronger orange tones. (I composed) through mossy pines and found a ranch with cattle pacing around, then grabbed my camera to capture this beautiful moment before the sun went to rest.” He photographed with a Nikon D80 and a Nikkor 18-200mm lens with an exposure of f/5.6 at 1/250 sec.
© Lorenzo Cassina

Crabbing At Day’s End
The golden glow of sunset and silhouette of the fisherman casting a net was caught by Steven Weiner with a Sony alpha 100 and a Tamron 18-200mm lens. Exposure was f/8 at 1/250 sec at ISO 200.
© Steven Weiner

Day’s End At A Resort
Bob Bader caught these vacationers enjoying the sunset at a resort near Negril, Jamaica. He worked with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II and an EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens. Exposure was 1/500 sec at f/5.6 at ISO 800. Mr. Bader told us he edited in Photoshop CS6 using a Nik HDR filter.
© Bob Bader

Cocoa Beach Sunrise
Dub Scroggin wrote: “There is another ‘golden hour’ just before the sun rises. This family was shooting the horizon where the sun was about to rise, so I included them in my shot of the clouds lit by the pending arrival of the sun.” He photographed with a Nikon D700 on a tripod using a Nikkor 24-120mm lens.
© Dub Scroggin

Bar Harbor Glow
Gerald Swede made this idyllic photo in Bar Harbor, Maine, right after sunset with a Nikon D80 and a Nikkor 16-85mm VR zoom lens on a tripod. Exposure was f/11 at 3 seconds.
© Gerald Swede

Siesta Beach
Photographer Larry Mulvehill wrote: ”I was walking on Siesta Beach in Sarasota, Florida, and came across this fellow looking into a tidal pool. (It was) just a grab shot and then he got up and walked away.” Mr. Mulvehill worked with a Nikon D90 and a Nikkor 20mm lens.
© Larry Mulvehill

Pier Sunrise
Mike Marston wrote us that this was among his first pictures with an ND filter—a great start. He shot with a Nikon D7100 and an AF-S Nikkor 80-200mm VR lens with a Hoya HMC NDx400 ND filter. Exposure was f/14 at 88 seconds and to keep things steady his rig was mounted atop a Manfrotto 055XPROB tripod with a Vanguard GH-100 ball head.
© Mike Marston

Picture This! – Our Next Assignment
The Power Of B&W

Our next Picture This! assignment is “The Power of Black and White.” While all images made with digital cameras are by their nature color (RGB), various conversion tactics allow for a dynamic rendition in the monochrome vein. And of course there’s monochrome mode on your camera and good old film. When uploading images be sure to include a brief description of the software and tactics used.

This photo was from a helicopter outside Las Vegas with a Panasonic DMC-TZ5 camera with an exposure of f/3.3 at 1/160 sec and converted in Photoshop CS6 with slight burn and dodge on the edges.
© George Schaub

How To Submit Online
1. Go to www.shutterbug.com and register. Scroll down the page and on the right side you will see a box for entering your username and your password. If you have already registered and/or submitted images for the Galleries you can skip this step. Respond to the activation e-mail. Registration is free. You will use your username and password whenever you visit or, with some systems, it will automatically load for you when you visit www.shutterbug.com.

2. Check the assignment and closing dates in the magazine. When the magazine is printed we will create an appropriate gallery for your images. The limit is two images per assignment.

3. Select and prepare your images. We only accept files at a maximum 5MB size, JPEG format. Save the JPEG at a quality level of 10 or higher. Note that file size in your image folder directory will determine upload size, not the “opened” file size, as JPEG compresses at 1:4 at higher quality ratings. If your images do not load it probably means you have exceeded the file size or have not used JPEG format.

4. Click on the Galleries tab on the homepage. In the Category section use the drop-down menu to select the Picture This! assignment. Note that images are simultaneously loaded into the assignment category as well as your own personal gallery. When the Picture This! assignment deadline date has lapsed the assignment gallery will be removed, but your images will still reside in your own gallery.

5. In the Description box add title, camera, lens, exposure information, and your full name. Also add any other comments or anecdotes you think relevant. We reserve the right to edit comments as needed.

6. Click the Save button at the bottom of the page. This uploads the image.

7. You retain copyright on the image.

8. We will choose the images after close of the due date.

9. Please feel free to comment on images submitted by other readers.

Scorecard
Deadline For Submission: March 15, 2014
Images will appear in our June 2014 issue

Our Next Topic: Silhouettes
Deadline For Submission:April 15, 2014
Publication Date: July 2014 issue

Please Note: By submitting you agree to give us the right to show the image(s) on the web and for publication. You give us publication rights in the magazine and on the website(s) of Source Interlink Media.

Please Note: If you submit images with an enhancement through software beyond contrast, exposure, and simple saturation adjustments please indicate the software and “filter” used to attain that effect.—Editor

Want to see images selected for past picture this! Assignments? Go to www.shutterbug.com and click on picture this! In the “more articles…” box on the homepage.

Please Note: If the photograph includes a minor or a recognizable individual or group you are guaranteeing that you have a signed model release form, and especially a parental or guardian release form for minors. You should keep a copy of that release in your files. Scan that release and keep it handy. If an image is chosen for publication, failure to provide a form when requested will eliminate the image from consideration. You can find release forms at http://asmp.org/tutorials/model-release-minor-child.html and other resources on the Internet. By uploading images you attest that the model release form is valid, that any depiction of a person is with their consent, that you have a model release form available on request, and that all images you submit have been made by you.

If you have any questions or problems e-mail us at editorial@shutterbug.com with Picture This! in the subject line.

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