Test Reports
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Edited by Georg... Apr 23, 2012 1 comments
The new Canon G1 X quite an extraordinary camera. It has thecompact body of a high-end point and shoot camera with a large CMOS 18.7x14mm sensor delivering 14 MP. This sensor is larger than Micro Four Third sensors (17.3x13 mm) in Panasonic or Olympus CSC cameras.
Paper & Ink, Test Reports
George Schaub Apr 20, 2012 4 comments
What qualifies a digital inkjet printing paper as “fine art?” To begin, it should be able to reproduce a wide range of tonal values and colors that satisfy the photographer. It should be “archival”, meaning that there should be no contaminants or even optical brighteners that could affect the print stability long term. And perhaps most important is that it should have that “look,” sometimes described as emulating a well-made darkroom print.
Steve Bedell Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

When asked to do a report on the LiteShaper, I said, "Great." I'd seen the product mentioned in previous Shutterbug issues and it looked very interesting and unique. A box full of several LiteShaper panels and a couple of softboxes soon arrived on my doorstep. I worked with small- and medium-sized Chimera softboxes. After putting the boxes together and adding the...

Peter K. Burian Dec 01, 2005 1 comments

The majority of digital cameras feature 3x optical zoom lenses, with a focal length range around 38-114mm (35mm equivalent). That's fine for portraits, group shots, nearby buildings or landscapes, and so on. But those lenses are not long enough for frame-filling shots of distant subjects: the goalie at a junior soccer game, an eagle on a high branch, or a tiger roaring at...

Peter K. Burian Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

The most affordable 6-megapixel digital SLR at the time of this writing, the Nikon D50 sells for about $250 less than the new/improved D70s. In spite of that substantial difference, the entry-level model incorporates much of the same technology and many of the same capabilities. And as a bonus, it's a bit smaller and lighter, more likely to appeal to those switching from a...

David B. Brooks Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

Ever since color inkjet printers made for photographic printing were introduced a significant portion of the photo community has felt they were left out because color inkjets have not provided a good solution for black and white photography compared to color. Now, Epson has responded with their new Stylus Photo R2400 that is really three printers in one. First, it is an even...

George Schaub Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

Coming in at just over a 1/2" thick and weighing an unnoticeable 4 oz, the Casio EXILIM EX-S500 is a wonder of miniaturization, considering it has a 3x optical zoom and 5-megapixel sensor. This, the latest version of Casio's mini-digicams, also has what the company terms Anti Shake DSP (Digital Signal Processor) and a large 2.2" LCD screen for both taking and...

Lenses, Test Reports
Jack Neubart Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

The Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM (16-35mm equivalent in 35mm parlance) was designed to cover the APS-C format, specifically the EOS 20D and both EOS Digital Rebels (plus future APS-C models). Canon's EF-S lenses (S = Short Back Focus) are physically matched to these cameras. This design also results in a smaller and lighter lens (3.5" long and less than 14 oz).

Joe Farace Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

Product cycles being what they are, it seemed to me that it was about time for another iteration of Adobe's Photoshop Elements a.k.a Photoshop for the less well-heeled, and so here it is. In Version 3.0, Adobe gave up on trying to make Elements look like Photoshop and that was a big step forward. In this latest version they've built upon that improved interface to make...

Lenses, Test Reports
Joe Farace Nov 01, 2005 1 comments

Tamron's AF18-200mm F/3.5-6.3 lens is part of their digitally integrated (Di II) lens series that's designed for digital SLRs and is not recommended for use with cameras having image sensors larger than 24x16mm, or 35mm film cameras. The lens is available in Canon EF, Konica Minolta AF-D, Nikon AF-D, and Pentax AF mounts and is maximized for smaller-sized imaging...

David B. Brooks Nov 01, 2005 0 comments

I must admit I was surprised that just two years after I reviewed the Konica Minolta DiMAGE Scan Elite 5400 the company would come out with an improved and substantially modified new model. As I noted in my report then, the 5400 was well ahead of the game in performance and value. So, what motivated Konica Minolta to make such a major change so soon? It is probably due to a number...

Joe Farace Nov 01, 2005 0 comments

For some time my favorite pocket camera has been Konica Minolta's DiMAGE Xg; I never go anywhere without it being tucked into its matching leather case. One of the features of the Xg that I like best, besides its ability to make great photographs, is its compact size. Then along comes Konica Minolta's DiMAGE X60, which delivers higher resolution images, better macro...

George Schaub Nov 01, 2005 5 comments

Here at Shutterbug we have followed the long and sometimes tortuous road toward getting quality black and white prints digital style. Readers, and we, have suffered through the rigors of metamerism, bronzing, and the associated color shifting and frustrated attempts to match what's on the screen with what comes out of the printer. We have tried duotones, third-party inks...

David B. Brooks Nov 01, 2005 0 comments

In their own language, Adobe claims that Creative Suite is the "powerhouse design environment that revolutionized print and web workflows for creative professionals worldwide." The words that define how Adobe relates their Creative Suite to users is "creative professionals." We can safely assume Adobe is primarily referring to all those who work...

Steve Bedell Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

I'm not really fussy about my lights. By that, I mean I'm not enamored by a specific brand and I don't need them to measure light in hundredths of a stop. I also don't need them to cycle in half a second. If I were a fashion or commercial photographer, things might be different, but as a portrait guy, my needs are pretty simple.