Software & Computers

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David B. Brooks Posted: Sep 01, 2006 0 comments

A computer system is essential to digital photography image processing and editing. Its components are a central processing unit, input devices like a keyboard and mouse, and a display/monitor. Only one of the computer's components has a significant role affecting the quality of photo images created, edited, and processed, and that is the display. To use software like...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

Many new software products are breaking new ground for digital photographers. In case you might wonder what more anybody could do with digital imaging software, the recent crop shown at PMA 2006 answers that question with a combination of innovative, practical, and fun products from diverse sources.

Windows Software
VicMan's (

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David B. Brooks Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

Is a new upgrade on software merely an excuse for a new revenue stream for companies? One could take that somewhat cynical view, but on the other hand I wonder if it is any different than any new model of a product that is made attractive by new and improved features. When we trade a still running car in for a new model we expect it will have better performance and new...

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Darryl C. Nicholas Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

For those of you who have Adobe's Photoshop installed on your computer, I'm sure that you know all about re-sizing pictures down and converting them to JPEG before attaching them to an e-mail.

This short tip is for everyone else.

Microsoft Windows XP has made the job very easy. All you need is to be using the Win-XP operating system and the...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

CPAC Imaging PRO, Version 3.0, is sold mainly as a retouching software for professionals with a sell line that says, "Outstanding results in just minutes." But it's much more than that. While Adobe's Photoshop is the de facto software for professional image-makers, that doesn't mean that there are not other applications that can perform some of...

Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2006 0 comments

It's clear that color management is a hot topic, and products that provide accurate results with a minimum amount of fuss or techno-jargon are in high demand. Two new products fit this need perfectly, plus there is one that handles the needs of the more advanced user.

Pantone, along with GretagMacbeth, has brought out the smallest display calibration device...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

Today's high-resolution digital cameras eat up lots of memory. High-capacity memory cards cost as much as a portable hard drive, so why not use a portable storage device and transfer card memory to that drive? Portable hard drives are battery-driven and most employ a 2.5" disk drive, while a few use the more expensive 1.8" drive. As an alternative there are...

Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

If there's anything you can count on with digital products, it's faster speeds, higher capacities, and lower costs. Nowhere is this truer than with memory cards. There was plenty of news from a variety of vendors.

SanDisk doubled the capacity of several of their most popular cards, including the Extreme III line of cards to 8GB in CompactFlash, and 2GB...

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David B. Brooks Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

Not long ago the last of the 21/22" quality graphic CRT monitors disappeared from the marketplace and a new era of LCD displays came into play. For many doing digital photography editing it was a new and unfamiliar world. It became a particular challenge because many of the models were configured and targeted at a market that is distinctly different from digital photography...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

"Of course, there will always be those who look only at technique, who ask `how,' while others of a more curious nature will ask `why.' Personally, I have always preferred inspiration to information."--Man Ray

ACDSee Pro: Digital Coincidence?
On the same day Adobe Systems announced the public beta of...

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David B. Brooks Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

As PCs evolved from the early to the mid-1990s and more and more had color monitors there was a flurry of interest among application programmers to develop and offer paint programs, mostly to provide computer users with a creative opportunity to make digital art. As color scanners became more available in the consumer market these paint applications were also used to input...

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David B. Brooks Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

With so many digital SLR cameras sold in the last few years it was inevitable that programmers would put together solutions to serve all of the needs of photographers in a comprehensive application. That Apple would be out front with their slick and powerful Aperture application, I think, caught some off guard. But considering all the independent activity in conversion support...

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George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2006 0 comments

A couple of years back, when digital "filters" started appearing, a number of us sat around and joked that there would soon be a Van Gogh or a Monet filter for images, with push-button conversion of any image to look like Starry Night or the lily pond in the Gardens of Giverny. It turns out that some code writer must have been listening; we now have plug-in filters...

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Joe Farace Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
--Douglas Adams

Like a lot of photographers, I take some things for granted. When inserting a CompactFlash card into a camera and capturing lots of images, I assume that I'll be able to transfer...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

According to the folks at Tribeca Imaging Laboratories (TIL), digital cameras (and I might add many types of film) "can't see purple." They go on to say, "The digital color model generates a limited spectrum. Any user can confirm this by simply pointing a camera at a deep blue or purple object and comparing the colors on the camera's LCD or computer...

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