Software & Computers

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David B. Brooks Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

In the summer of 2007 I received news about a new version of SilverFast scanning software that included additional and improved features, most significantly for this report something dubbed Multi-Exposure. This is a strategy involving two scan passes: one with normal exposure and a second with amplified exposure applied just to the shadow regions of the film image; then these two...

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Jon Canfield Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

I've written about the advantages of graphic tablets before, and most recently reviewed the Wacom Bamboo line of inexpensive tablets in these pages (see April 2008 issue). Today, I'm headed in the opposite direction and taking a look at the Cintiq 12WX tablet, also by Wacom.

What makes the Cintiq line different from the entry-level Bamboo...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Most serious digital photographers know that using a graphic tablet is the best way by far when it comes to editing and making selections in Photoshop and other imaging applications. There is a learning curve when switching from a mouse to a pen, but after using one I don't know of any photographers who would go back to the old method. Along with the finer control you have...

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Rod Lawton Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

If your computer's hard disk fails, and you don't have any kind of backup, you will lose your entire digital photo collection for good. You might not enjoy thinking about it, but it's a fact that has to be faced. In my opinion you shouldn't put too much faith in recovery utilities and specialist data recovery companies. The success of these depends on the...

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Rod Lawton Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

It's a fact of photographic life that some of the most exciting lighting conditions are also the most challenging. Bright sunlight produces intense colors but also areas of very deep shadow, and with heavily backlit subjects the difference in brightness between the highlights and shadows may be so great that one or the other must be sacrificed. And yet, the conventional...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Mar 01, 2008 1 comments

Shooting JPEG images is similar to shooting color negative film and handing the roll to a photo lab for processing and printing. The results--overall--are generally good. But someone else is making decisions about sharpness, white balance, saturation, and other vital parameters that determine how the final image looks. In the case of digital cameras, a group of engineers...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

I've got to confess that when I received the software from Graphic Authority it took me a while to look at it. Why? Because I'm not the most technical guy. I use Photoshop daily but that doesn't mean I'm an expert. I pretty much just do the same thing all the time. If they had sent me one CD with a few things to look at, no problem. But what I received was...

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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

In this article, I'll be looking at some plug-in classics that have been around for a while, and at a couple of new programs as well. The new programs include a plug-ins package and a stand-alone application, originally created for motion picture-quality video that's also used to create impressive special effects in photos.

Corel's KPT...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

Image-editing applications that run on a Windows PC have been available since the early 1990s. In that decade and a half digital photography has grown and changed dramatically, requiring new and different kinds of image-editing support. One of the applications that has been around for most of that time is Paint Shop Pro, now under Corel's ownership. Over the years it has...

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Howard Millard Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

Are you shooting digital now, but sometimes long for the gritty look of pushed Tri-X, or the impressionistic color characteristics of a faded Polaroid? To add the organic look of specific film types to your photos, or transform them with a wide range of processing and darkroom effects, try one of the 300 presets available in the second generation of Alien Skin's...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

There is a substantial interest in black and white among photo enthusiasts, particularly if you include infrared. That's why Epson, Canon, and HP developed printers capable of reproducing good black and white prints. On the camera side of digital, however, there is only one quite high-end black and white possibility I currently know of--the MegaVision medium format...

Ben Willmore Posted: Feb 01, 2008 1 comments

Black & White
In previous versions of Photoshop, the most common method for converting a color image to black & white was to use the Channel Mixer. It was a clunky, counter-intuitive process that forced you to think like Photoshop instead of allowing your brain and eyes to naturally digest what was being done to your image. The new Black & White...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

Mac users can use Aperture to attain good foundation monochrome images from digital camera and scanned RGB files. Because Aperture treats the original raw file as sacrosanct, and works in Versions from what it dubs the Master, many options can be explored before exporting the file to image-manipulation software for further refinement. As with any conversion software, I suggest...

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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

There are literally thousands of plug-ins available for Adobe's Photoshop, from expensive applications created by major software vendors to freeware created by part-time graphic programmers. However, seldom does a plug-in have as close a relationship to Photoshop as Red Giant Software's Knoll Light Factory for Photoshop. The plug-in was created by Photoshop co-creator...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

How can you make the most use out of that limited quantity of memory cards when on the road, especially on a long trip? The answer: a portable drive. When connected to a host computer via USB 2.0, all these devices are recognized as an external drive--but not immediately in some cases: it may require activation of a USB function on the device. Adding to the utility of many of...

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