Outdoor Tips

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Mike Stensvold Posted: Apr 01, 2004 0 comments
Spring is the season of rebirth and renewal—hence, the ritual of spring cleaning. It's also a season of contrasts: there's still snow in the high elevations, while the lower regions come into bloom; and there are hot summery spells and cold wintry spells interspersed with milder days. So in most areas, you can shoot "winter" shots and "summer" shots in thespring...
Mike Stensvold Posted: Apr 01, 2004 0 comments

 

 

Real-world tips for the "artistically challenged"

Great artists are probably born, not made. But there are a lot of things 'most anyone can do to make better photos. One biggie is thinking about composition when you shoot. Here are some easy ways to jump-start your creative eye.

Put It Where It Works

...

Lynne Eodice Posted: Apr 01, 2004 0 comments

You don't have to wait for good weather to photograph an intriguing sky. In its many moods, the sky can be a wonderful, ever-changing photographic subject. You can take pictures of puffy white clouds, dramatically colorful sunrises or sunsets, an ominous storm front moving in, and possibly a rainbow after the storm clears. Shoot...

Ron Leach Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

 

 

A Unique Photographic Perspective of Our Planet

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have collaborated on a joint initiative called the Landsat project, which has resulted in a collection of stunning images that provide a unique photographic perspective of our...

Lynne Eodice Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

All Photos by Cappy Jackson

 

A prize-winning photographer who's best known for her equestrian images, Cappy Jackson got an early start. At age 14 she became an assistant to an established pro, Peter Winants, who was the staff photographer for a magazine called Maryland...

Lynne Eodice Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

All Photos by Abe Ordover

 

Abe Ordover is a nature photographer who combines his camera work with Adobe Photoshop to create images that are uniquely his own; photographs that reveal to the viewer what Ordover felt when he shot the scene.
He's traveled worldwide to...

Lynne Eodice Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

 

 

 

One of the most challenging—and gratifying—subjects to photograph is wildlife. The primary obstacle is getting close enough to wild animals to take dramatic photos of them. Your best bet is a telephoto lens—a few point-and-shoot film cameras offer built-in zooms as long as 200mm at the telephoto end, and...

Text and photography by Mike Stensvold Posted: Jan 01, 2004 2 comments

There are lots of special-effects accessories on camera-store shelves, and they are well worth checking out if you're into special effects. But you don't need a lot of fancy accessories to create some interesting and unusual photographic effects. In fact, if you have a basic SLR (single-lens reflex) camera—film or digital—there are several special effects you can produce with no...

Ron Leach Posted: Jan 01, 2004 0 comments

For over 30 years Petersen's Photographic Magazine has been recognized as the leading instructional magazine for photo enthusiasts. Our goal has been to inspire readers with dramatic imagery, and to offer clear and simple instructional articles to help photographers improve their skills.

To further this mission, we have created the Photographic Faculty; a team of seven...

Lynne Eodice Posted: Jan 01, 2004 0 comments

 

 

 

As the subject of a photograph, texture speaks to our sense of touch. The way that things feel is very ingrained in our consciousness. Texture tells us about the nature of a subject, whether it's the rough surface of a straw hat, or the silky smoothness of satin. The light that reveals an object's texture also gives us a sense of...

The Editors Posted: Oct 01, 2003 0 comments

Ways to be bright when it gets dark.

Low-light photography can yield some amazingly striking and unusual images. But it also presents a problem. You need a fast enough shutter speed to prevent camera-shake-induced image blurring, and sometimes to "freeze" a moving subject. You often need to shoot at a small enough aperture to provide adequate depth of field. You want to use the...

The Editors Posted: Sep 01, 2003 1 comments

Some ways to help offset the cost of your favorite pastime

There are lots of way to make money in photography, including selling and trading photo gear, processing film and making prints for other photographers, scanning images (slides, negatives and prints) and putting them on CDs for others, retouching photos, copying and restoring old photos, collecting collectible photographs...

Lynne Eodice Posted: Aug 01, 2003 0 comments

All photos by David Schultz

 

According to nature photographer David Schultz, "Spring and Fall are my busy times for picture-taking." Aspen and maple trees adorned in fall colors are big sellers at West Light Images, Schultz' photo gallery located in Park City, Utah. People also enjoy decorating their walls with spring wildflowers, he observes.

...

The Editors Posted: Aug 01, 2003 1 comments

Sun & Games Fun with the sun...and more

1. Sun Stars
Your wide-angle lens at its smallest aperture can turn the sun into a star in your photos—fitting, since the sun actually is a star. The effect occurs because the tiny aperture diffracts the incoming light rays a lot. This diffraction causes the star effect. You can include the sun as a compositional. Photo by...

Lynne Eodice Posted: Jul 01, 2003 0 comments

All photos by Don Gale

 

Have you ever embarked on an exciting wilderness adventure that promised great photo opportunities, only to be disappointed with your images after you got home? Maybe the skies in your pictures weren't as blue as you remembered them, or the colors as vivid. Perhaps the grand vistas you experienced appeared a little washed-out in your...

Pages